Interview with Author – L.J.Simpson

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About L.J.Simpson:
L.J. Simpson was born in Wolverhampton, England in 1956. He worked primarily in the steel industry until 1990 when he embarked on a fairly radical change of direction, moving to Japan where he opened a small English language school. Married with two grown up children, work still takes up a great deal of his time. The remainder he divides up between taking long walks by the sea with his ever faithful border collie, building model tall ships and writing.

What inspires you to write?
I can’t remember a time when I never enjoyed writing. As a student my favourite assignments were always writing essays, whether it be in the English classroom, history, geography or whatever.
When I moved from my native England to Japan some twenty five years ago I became an avid letter writer. My, was the telephone expensive in those days.
I started writing fiction about four years ago – just as a hobby. Straight away I found that it gave me a buzz. It’s such a lot of fun to create characters and think about how the next scene will play out. For some reason I also enjoy playing around with sentences, changing the grammar, always searching for a better rhythm.
I don’t expect for a minute that I will ever make my fortune or become well known, but that really doesn’t matter. I write because it’s fun.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have a very general outline of how the story will pan out but as for the rest, the story seems to evolve with a life of it’s own.
I probably spend three times as much time thinking than writing. This is usually done during the long walks I take with my beautiful border collie through the woods and down by the sea. Once home I jot a few things down in a notebook and take it from there.
Once I start writing I find that one sentence leads to another, which in turn gives me another idea and I think, “What if this happens, or what if that happens…?” Then I take the dog out and begin the cycle all over again.
Healthy for the body, healthy for the mind. The dog’s happy too.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
All the time. I imagine I’m on an acting set and we try a few lines. Director keeps saying ‘CUT!’

What advice would you give other writers?
I’m not sure how much advice I can give to other writers as most of them probably have more experience than me. For someone who is just starting out I would say that I spent three and a half years writing my first book which at 253 pages isn’t even particularly long. I wrote at my own speed, didn’t set deadlines and always did my best to write as well as I possibly could.
Just stick at it and don’t give up.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I chose to self publish with Amazon KDP Select. The reasons being that it allows you to run promotions and also opens up your book to members of Kindle Unlimited who can borrow your book for a page by page reading fee.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Wish I knew. I still believe that a physical book is a thing of beauty and that every house should have a bookcase stocked with real books. However, I doubt if the march of the e book will be anything but relentless.

What genres do you write?: Sci fi, sci-fi adventure

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
L.J.Simpson Home Page Link
Link To L.J.Simpson Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Christopher Coates

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About Christopher Coates:
Christopher Coates grew up on Cape Cod Massachusetts, and moved to Michigan for college.
He currently lives in Kent City Michigan with his wife-Jerri, daughter-Nicole and son-Jared.
Christopher is a retired Firefighter/Paramedic who works full time in Information Systems for a major West Michigan company.
His goal is for the his first book, The Ark, to launch him into a successful writing career

What inspires you to write?
My father was a writer, who unsuccessfully fought to get published in the days before computers and online publishing

Tell us about your writing process.
I like to have a general idea, and wait to see what develops as I write. The final product is usually not what I expected when I started

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I wrote The Ark several years ago, and could net get traditional publishers to look at it. After several years of it sitting and going nowhere, I decided to self publish

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the entire industry will be transformed by technology. Traditional publishing will continue to shrink

What genres do you write?: Military, Comet, Apocalyspe, Future, End of World, Survival, Sci-Fi

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Christopher Coates Home Page Link
Link To Christopher Coates Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Ariella Moon

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About http://bookgoodies.com/?s=Ariella+Moon:
Ariella Moon draws upon her experiences as a shaman to create magical Young Adult fiction. Her series include The Two Realms Trilogy, a medieval fantasy adventure, and The Teen Wytche Saga, a series of sweet contemporary paranormal romances.
Ariella spent her childhood searching for a magical wardrobe that would transport her to Narnia. Extreme math anxiety and taller students that mistook her for a leaning post marred her youth. Despite these horrors, she graduated summa cum laude from the University of California at Davis. She lives a nearly normal life doting on her extraordinary daughter, two shamelessly spoiled dogs, and a media-shy dragon.

What inspires you to write?
My daughter was the original inspiration for my writing. When she was a preteen, it was difficult to find age appropriate books that matched her advanced reading and comprehension skills. So I started writing The Teen Wytche Saga, novels that combine contemporary sweet romances and magic with difficult subject matters ⎯ death of a parent, sibling rivalry, teen depression, and more ⎯ in a manner suitable for ages 12 and up. Now, with my daughter grown, I have launched The Two Realms Trilogy, a magical medieval Young Adult fantasy that begins with The Beltane Escape.

Tell us about your writing process.
I do a lot of plotting and character development in my head before my fingers tap the keyboard. My writing follows a three-act structure and the hero’s journey. I used to map out every chapter on sticky notes adhered to a black trifold display. Now, once I have a rough idea of the plot, I’ll create a word document containing a paragraph or two of what needs to be accomplished in each act. I usually rewrite the first chapter several times as more information reveals itself. The rest of the book is written in near-finished draft and requires very little editing.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters deliver messages to me through my muse ⎯ usually while I’m in the shower, driving the car, or just about to fall asleep. If I’m blocked, then I go into shaman mode (my other career). I’ll meditate or do a character interview to discover what I need to change or include.

What advice would you give other writers?
Join writers’ organizations like SCBWI, Romance Writers of America, and Sisters in Crime and enter their writing contests. Attend writing conferences. Hone your craft and never give up!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
The tremendous success of many hybrid authors in my Romance Writers of America chapter influenced me to pursue a combination of traditional and self-publishing. Clean Reads (Astraea Press), a small niche press, publishes my Teen Wytche Saga. Small presses are a great way for authors to get their foot inside the publishing door. But they are not without risks, as authors for Ellora’s Cave and Samhain have discovered. To balance that risk and gain higher royalties and creative control, I created Star Tribe Publishing to publish The Two Realms Trilogy.

I would advise new authors to explore all options. Most traditional publishers offer good advances and print royalties. But their digital royalties often lag behind small presses and self-publishing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think book publishing will continue to evolve. Self-publishing is on the rise. Transmedia, where an author creates new content like a movie and/or video game related to her books (Disney has a genius for this) will be the next wave. Book publishing will never die. Books are too important!

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Young Adult, Fantasy, Young Adult Contemporary Romance, Young Adult Historical Romance, Paranormal & Fantasy

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
http://bookgoodies.com/?s=Ariella+Moon Home Page Link
Link To http://bookgoodies.com/?s=Ariella+Moon Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Barnes and Noble

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Pinterest
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Cameron Hart

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About Cameron Hart:
Cameron Sky Hart was born in Los Angeles, California, grew up in the French-Dutch Antilles, on a little island called St. Martinique, until she immigrated to Brighton, England, and returned to the States at sixteen.

Growing Up Caffarelli-DeSonto was her debut novel inspired by the bullying she faced coming back to the States from East Sussex. She first fell in love with writing books in a series when she began to read The Tillerman stories by Cynthia Voigt and Sweet Valley High by Francine Pascal.

She also writes about egomaniac angels, sexy rock stars, human shifters, and unconventional superheroes.

What inspires you to write?
The first teacher I had when I first came to the States. When I was young I was extremely shy and kept my head buried in books, though I didn’t know how to read.
While she was tutoring me I’d make up these stories and tell them to her. I figure creating my own stories would get me out of reading other people’s. Reading and writing was hard for me I didn’t get to learn how when I was younger due my rough early years.
She started me out writing my own nursery rhymes followed by short poems. She entered one of my poems into the local publication.
I was so excited I tried harder to get over my disability and wrote in a journal every day after that.

Tell us about your writing process.
Like everyone, I get my best ideas in the shower. Story after story rains down on me along with conditioner I always get in my eyes. I remember this one agent told me I suffered from world building. It was funny because the email before that said I used too much dialogue. I thought I was brilliant when I decided to make an outline. I’d never used one before I just freestyled. Outlines worked they kept me on task and I stuck to them. My bohemian self was caged and I didn’t feel a connection when I read over everything. Outlines went out and chaos returned.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I often question my sanity. My characters like to show up in my dreams and act as if I don’t exist. Hello, creator.
I used to try to talk with them but they’d disappear and the rest of the dream would end up with me having to take a test.
Most people fear showing up in the nuddy pants, public speaking, I fear test. I especially hate multiple choice. I’m already nervous and they want to add multiple questions.
Now I do the logical thing and sit at the dream Starbucks and watch them.

What advice would you give other writers?
I’ve said this in two other interviews and I’ll say it until I’m old. Write. It doesn’t matter or little or how much simply write something daily. Put it away then go back to it with fresh eyes. Some work is worth a bin toss others are worth exploring.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I originally wanted to go with the traditional publishing house. No, it wasn’t that I was sick of rejection. There was plenty, sure, but that wasn’t it. There’s no place for my stories in traditional publishing. Antonio Caffarelli-DeSonto, from my debut novel, Growing Up Caffarelli-DeSonto story doesn’t end when he finishes secondary school. I’ve taken him from an eighth grader to a adult (new adult).
There all these characters and this whole world that’s centred around him. Being an Indie writer allows me to show Toni’s journey and introduced new characters from his universe. It’s almost like watching a long running telly series.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that both traditional and online publishing will merge. A lot of publishing houses are opening up a separate online-only format for reading and submitting manuscripts. It’s the only thing that makes sense. The excitement, feel, and smell, of a new book can’t be replaced, but neither can a tablet, laptop, mobile. These electrics that were told to disconnect from some time are a part of us. Who hasn’t gone to the loo with their mobile?

What genres do you write?: Fantasy, YA, NA (New Adult), Paranormal, Contemporary Romance,

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To Cameron Hart Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Maggie C. Brynnon

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About Maggie C. Brynnon:
I am a free spirit who loves animals, traveling and just hanging out with my family, friends and pets. I also love to read (I read everything I can get my hands on, fiction-wise, LOL), always have and probably always will, and I am now just starting to pen some of my stories to paper – well, digital paper at least, LOL.

Romances about interesting people in unusual situations are the genre I enjoy writing the most for now… but who knows where I’ll go next. 🙂 And if you want to join me online feel free to come on by and drop me a line on my Facebook page 🙂

What inspires you to write?
People, animals and the interaction between species inspires me everyday. Just watching people gives me all sorts of ideas and story inspirations.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have general ideas about what will be the general arc of the story and then I just start writing. Of course, I change things throughout the process, add things here, take them away there… until I am happy with the final product. And if I feel I can go further with the story then I plan and write the next installment. I am not a super-duper-planner-type writer by any means.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I have conversations in my mind between my characters that I listen to behind the scenes, LOL.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you have a story in you, then share it. Don’t stifle your creativity! Don’t worry about things like grammar, spelling, etc. – just write it.

Then you can always go back and clean it up later – heck, that’s what editors and spell check are for, right? And just think how proud you and your family will be once you are all done. And who knows where it may lead you!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I am a voracious reader – always have been – and have always imagined different stories and characters in different locales. So, finally one day about a year or so ago I came up with some ideas for this interracial couple- I envisioned the soldier first (and his dog of course) and then the heroine and then it just went from there.

Then I just started writing… and here we are 4 books later in that Hero series (I’m working on the 5th) and one other series I just started called Hometown Hero. I chose to publish digitally because it is easy and I can.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I believe that even with the explosion of new books via digital means that traditional books will flourish as well. There is just nothing like holding a real, hard copy book in your hands – the feeling of the pages in your hands, the smell… I think they will both continue to do well.

What genres do you write?: Romance, BWWM, Military romance, Interracial romance, multicultural romance

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Maggie C. Brynnon Home Page Link
Link To Maggie C. Brynnon Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Elizabeth Wills

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About Elizabeth Wills:
Elizabeth Wills was born in Maryland. She married her high school sweetheart and they are now raising two spunky boys. When she’s not writing, she’s working her part time job in radiology, chasing her two busy children and tending to her home. Elizabeth has a passion for reading and enjoys a good love triangle.

What inspires you to write?
This is a tough question to answer because it depends on my mood. I do like a quiet house, which means I either wake up early or stay up late, since I am the mother of two very busy boys. I don’t have a playlist for my books, but I do turn on Pandora and choose a station that is fitting for what I am writing. I like the random selection of songs to guide the story.

Tell us about your writing process.
I love to let my characters tell their own story. I know who they are, and the overall premise of the story, but the details usually don’t come to me until I’m typing them. I start at the beginning and write as if I were reading a story from page one until the end. I just have to step back and let my characters talk to me.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I always listen to them. It’s their story to tell, not mine.

What advice would you give other writers?
To stay true to themselves, and write what their heart calls them to. If you receive a bad review, use it to better your craft. If the negative kills your spirit, go to your all time favorite authors books and read their negative reviews. We all get them, and that’s okay. It should not kill drive to write.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I started by sharing my books with friends and their excited triggered something in me to share my stories with as many people as possible.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I try to live for today.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Contemporary Romance, Contemporary Women’s Fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Elizabeth Wills Home Page Link
Link To Elizabeth Wills Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Alex Hansen

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About Alex Hansen:
Alex Hansen is a part-time writer from Pennsylvania who specializes in interpretive rewrites of elementary school science textbooks.

Just kidding. But he has written about demons, dystopias and drive-thrus, so maybe nothing is off-limits. Inspired by a broad range of authors including Stephen Crane, Oscar Wilde, Dean Koontz and K. A. Applegate, he strives to craft interesting and relatable tales that have a little bit of heart and plenty of comedy.

What inspires you to write?
There’s just so much stuff out there that’s fascinating, from the intricacies of time travel paradoxes to the complexities of what makes a person tick. Writing, for me, is a way to explore anything and everything that strikes my fancy. Also, it’s a way to make me giggle to myself while I’m working on something particularly weird.

Tell us about your writing process.
It usually starts with an idea that comes to me during a sleepless night or a hot shower. Then it progresses to the planning stage, which involves jotting down a lot of notes to myself during work and culminates in combining all those notes into a semi-coherent typed form. Then I’ll write a couple of chapters, abandon the project for a few months because it’s horrendous, and then stumble across it on my hard drive a while later after I’ve forgotten how much I hate it. The rest of the process goes pretty smoothly after that.

I guess I’d say I plan about half of my plot points and ten percent of my most important dialogue ahead of time and for the rest of it I’m flying blind and seeing what happens.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I tend to act as my characters instead of interact with them. I occasionally test out chunks of dialogue aloud—sometimes it’s entire conversations. It helps me figure out what the most natural phrasing is and where to punctuate or italicize. But I realize that this looks crazy, so if I’m in public and you see my lips moving, it’s because I’m doing my best to hide my craziness.

What advice would you give other writers?
Steer into the skid.

If there’s a common thread to your stories or a common criticism against them, don’t force yourself to change what kind of writer you are. Double down on whatever it is and make it your own. Maybe if you polish what some people dislike about your writing, it can become the special ingredient that sets you apart from the boring masses.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’m kind of a wimp. I allow myself to become discouraged very easily when things are difficult. After sending out exactly one query letter and receiving exactly one rejection, I realized that I’d probably be able to talk myself out of ever doing that again.

Rather than sit there being discouraged, I opted for the easier route of self-publishing. I’m by no means successful, but I have four novels out now, and that’s something to be proud of. And I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have done nearly that much writing if I’d stuck to sending out query letters.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Man, I don’t know.

As much respect as I have for tons of traditionally published authors, I’ve started to read a lot of indie books lately, and we have a lot to offer. It’ll be interesting to see how it all plays out, though.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: humor, science fiction, new adult, literary fiction, fantasy, paranormal

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Alex Hansen Home Page Link
Link To Alex Hansen Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Aaron Morgan


About Aaron Morgan:
Aaron Morgan is the author of the book “Downfall”, his first published novel. Since a young age, Aaron has always enjoyed writing, and found it quite calming and fascinating. Finally, while completing his schooling at his local college, he has found the time to publish one of his stories. Born and raised in Florida, Aaron enjoys many things, from just a casual walk through the park, to volunteering. Aaron resides in Florida, along with his family, happily working diligently on his next installment in the “Downfall” series.
He is currently hoping to establish a long line of books, to thrill readers everywhere and readers of all ages.

What inspires you to write?
For me, I love to write. Ever since I was a little kid, I have always enjoyed it. Sometimes I would write horror short stories, while others it would be about a super-hero named after me. But I always enjoyed it, and I loved to learn new words and increase my vocabulary. Nevertheless, towards the end of my high school education, I was just thinking about what I could do with my wriitng, and it popped into my head to try and become an author! Yes, it is much harder to write a book then it seemed, but once I got started, I was on a roll. I do admit that at times, I felt dejected and as if the book would never end. But I had my family, my friends, and the world to inspire me. I had the dream to continue on, and to become an author. So i continued wriitng. And eventually, one day, it got published.

Tell us about your writing process.
First off, I start with a small story outline. I write what I think the storyline should be like, and the overall character analysis. I make a few character, the storyline, and the environment in which the story will take place. I then begin writing my first draft, including the storyling and characters I created in the beginning. Most of the time, however, I come up with new ideas, so I alter the storyline a bit to fit my new plans. And, I admit it usually turns out quite nicely. Eventually, I finish the book, and then I go into my editing/re-writing phase. I read the book, front cover to back cover, and search for every single grammatical error and typing error that can be found. I find most of them, but sometimes I don’t, and I face the fact that no one is perfect. After finishing my second draft, I read it once more, and then further hand it off to a friend or some family to proof-read and give out any indications as to what can be done to make it better. After obtaining the book once more and making final changes, I send it to my publisher and get it published!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
It depends on the time of day, if people are in the room, etc. In general, if I am writing and I am alone in a room, I think to myself certain scenarios that I could be in and how the characters would respond. I believe it further helps me not only connect to my characters, and to further their personalities, but to allow the readers to connect and become one with the characters as well.

What advice would you give other writers?
I would give some major advice: Do not rush things. Take them one step at a time, and work hard, but slowly, on your book or novel. Make sure it is a great book, not only to yourself, but friends, family, and the world as well. Get some opinion’s on it, and before trying to market or promote your book, at least know it’s worth it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After writing for quite some time, and researching my options, I decided to become a self-published author. I felt as if I would have a feeling of higher achievement if I edited, and made the cover, and proff-read it all myself. Of course, there are negatives to self-publishing, as there is negatives and positives to everything, but if I had to do it again (which i will multiple times in the future), I will choose self-publishing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I believe that in the future, either near or far, there will be many writer’s to come, each with new ideas, and new stories. Each with new worlds, and new characters. And with each of these, comes the change in publishing. Hopefully, there will be many changes ijn the future, that not only open the door’s to publishing for many writers, but that can allow the readers of the world to be astounded as well.

What genres do you write?: Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Adventure, Horror, Crime, Mystery, Thriller, Young-Adult

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link to Author Page on other site

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Chance McGuire

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About Chance McGuire:
Chance McGuire—a 16 year old author, who’s working on his dream—was born and raised in Kansas, where he still resides in his hometown. When not writing, he can usually be found reading a book or spending quality time with his friends. The world of words has been a part of his life ever since he can remember.

What inspires you to write?
My friends and family inspire me to write, along with my creative mindset, which helps bring it all together.

Tell us about your writing process.
I usually just start writing the first chapter, jump right in to the story, and then come back later for editing and adding in more detail or events.

What advice would you give other writers?
“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to go with the self publishing method, because I wanted to try making it on my own and think I can with the help of my friends.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think book publishing will always be around, but it will drastically change within the next fifty years.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Paranormal, Coming of Age, Science Fiction, Action, Thriller

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Chance McGuire Home Page Link
Link To Chance McGuire Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Raye Wagner

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About Raye Wagner:
Raye Wagner has been influenced by stories her entire life. With seven siblings, she learned to escape chaos through the pages of fantasy. Later, she pursued a career in nursing inspired by a fictional character (Kitty Fremont, Exodus by Leon Uris). After finishing a popular mythology book where the Sphinx was portrayed as a game show hostess, Raye decided the majestic creature deserved a better fate. The plot for Curse of the Sphinx dropped into her head, and she began to write.
Raye lives with her husband and three children in Middle Tennessee. She enjoys baking, Tae Kwon Do, trips to the beach, and time with her family.

What inspires you to write?
I’ve had inspiration strike for so many different reasons. My debut novel was inspired after reading a very popular author’s take on the Greek mythological monster, the Sphinx. I hated how she was portrayed, and with sudden clarity, her story unfolded. Interestingly enough, the Sphinx from Thebes is not the main character in my series, although there is a prequel novel (still unpublished) that has her story.
I wrote a short story based on an uprising in a small town in Mexico (will be published in an anthology in June 2016) titled, Narcos.
I have several more ideas in my head, but I need more time to write.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have three children, a part-time job as a nurse practitioner, and I *try* to exercise regularly. I write when I can. I’m hoping when the last one starts school I’ll get into a better routine.
I like to know where the destination is, but how I get there isn’t always how I’d planned. I’ve never plotted scene by scene, but I do outline now. I totally pantsed my first novel, and the clean up/editing was a disaster.
I did better with plotting a general idea with book 2, and more so with book 3. So far, I’m liking that process much better.
I don’t do character sketches, but I definitely take time to get to know them. I’ll spend several hours “chatting” with them in my head so they become the characters they were meant to be. There are times when I write, that I’ll have to stop and explore why one did something, but it becomes clear once we talk it through. lol

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Whoops, I think I answered this above. I do talk and listen to my characters. A lot. And then I will take notes on what they say.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write. There are difficult times when the words won’t flow. Times when you hate sitting at the computer. Times when your story feels flat, and times when it really is. Just keep writing.
The longer I write, the more I realize there is no destination. There is only the journey.
Enjoy the journey.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I read two fabulous authors that were indie published. Their books were every bit as good as a “traditionally” published book. Then I went to an indie conference and saw how well indies could do. I’ve since become friends with both those authors that inspired me on the path.
Best thing about this journey is how supportive indies are.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It will change. Again and again. There will be times you will be so frustrated (by whatever path you choose) with your limitations that you’ll wonder why you’re doing this whole writing thing… And it will change again.
If you have a story to tell, then tell it.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Young Adult

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Raye Wagner Home Page Link
Link To Raye Wagner Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Ned Campbell

nedcampbell
About Ned Campbell:
Ned Campbell’s strong personal philosophy combines a deep understanding of natural human history with an advanced personal interest in natural remedies, food cures, and overall good health. He helps provide and distribute information on the Paleo diet as the best way to prevent degenerative disease.

What inspires you to write?
Having a strong passion for fitness and health, Campbell is also an experienced outdoorsman, and participates in amateur foot orienteering events, in his rugged home state of Colorado. He is an experienced backpacker, and served as a guide in the Rockies.
At home in his Colorado residence, Campbell prepares healthy Paleo dishes for his two sons and their beagle, Rosy.

Tell us about your writing process.
Ned Campbell’s strong personal philosophy combines a deep understanding of natural human history with an advanced personal interest in natural remedies, food cures,
and overall good health.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Campbell’s true passion to bring physical wellbeing to everyone began with his father’s Parkinson’s diagnosis in 2002.
The family tragedy caused by this degenerative disease pushed Campbell to research the natural cure and prevention of Parkinson’s and other degenerative conditions,
and share his studies with the world. Today, Campbell helps provide and distribute information on the Paleo diet as the best way to prevent degenerative disease.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that this is the best time to be an indie author.
The publishing industry is going through dramatic changes, what with readers having access to an unprecedented array of options. E-readers have gotten so much better since the first Kindles came out. Now customers have instant access to millions of titles. I truly believe that there is a more vibrant market for literary material than ever before,

What do you use?: Ghostwriter

What genres do you write?: Paleo Diet, Juicing Recipes

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Ned Campbell Home Page Link
Link To Ned Campbell Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Melissa Brock

Melissa-150x150
About Melissa Brock:
Melissa lives in Sydney, Australia, she has 3 children aged 8 years and under. Married to her childhood sweet heart for 18 years. Previously worked in the sales and marketing industry and now is a stay at home mum looking after her beautiful children.

What inspires you to write?
My children give me my inspiration to write. I have always wanted to write children’s books, but it wasn’t until I actually had children and was reading books to them that I realised I couldn’t find the types of books I wanted for them and so I started to write my own that I could read to them.

Tell us about your writing process.
Most of my ideas come to me in a dream and then I just have to put pen to paper and write it all down. Most of the dreams have come about from stories I made up with my children during the day, but the really come to life in my dreams.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
definitely have to be a good listener, my characters let me know which way they want a story to go.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you have a dream of writing, just do it. Don’t let it slip away, and once you start make sure you finish it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I knew how hard it is to publish a book which is why I think a lot of people don’t do it. I found out how to self publish and this was the key to making my dreams reality.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I hope that more opportunities arise for people to self publish, there are so many undiscovered authors with fabulous ideas out there.

What do you use?: Ghostwriter, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: childrens books

What formats are your books in?: eBook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.