Interview with Author – Lenita Sheridan

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About Lenita Sheridan:
Lenita Sheridan was born in Seattle, Washington. She moved to Fairbanks, Alaska with her parents when she was three. The Alaskan woods were her playground while she was growing up, a source of inspiration and imagination.

In her twenties, she moved back to Washington state. She started Guardian of the Gauntlet in the middle of a snow storm when school was closed. She later entered graduate school at the University of Washington and finished the book for her master’s thesis. She graduated with a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing.

She now lives on Whidbey Island where she is a writer, caregiver, and substitute teacher. Her interests include singing, crafts, and walking her dog, a Japanese Spitz named Haley.

What inspires you to write?
I am inspired to write by different places I’ve lived such as the Goldstream Valley (outside of Fairbanks) where I lived when I was growing up in Alaska. I also lived in Northern Ireland and traveled all around the British Isles. I saw many castles. I now live on the island where I can walk to the beach any time I want.

Tell us about your writing process.
I began as a seat of the pants writer. When that didn’t work, I started outlining. My outlines are simple chapter summaries. I don’t create character sketches.

I like to write on paper before typing in to the computer because I write in drafts and the more drafts the better.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I encourage my characters, especially my main character, Camari. I tell her that nothing is impossible with the gauntlet, just like nothing is impossible with God.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you are going to self-publish, make sure you think about how the reader would view your blurb. Take a step outside yourself and be someone else if you can. You made need to make changes, not only to the blurb, but to the entire book.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I had sent my manuscript to many places. I had even had an agent take it at a writer’s conference and never return it. This helped me to make the decision to self-publish, plus it was at a turning point in my life, after a divorce.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think people will always want hard copy books, something they can hold (even though I love my Kindle).

What genres do you write?: fantasy, Christian, inspirational, middle grade, Y/A, science fiction, poetry

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lenita Sheridan Home Page Link
Link To Lenita Sheridan Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Tanja Russita

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About Tanja Russita:
Hi.
I’m Tanja. I live in Tromso, Norway.
Life here is simple, clear, fair and close to nature; somehow funny and challenging too! Hopefully, this is reflected in my books.
I draw, and describe my pictures in words if needed; this is what I call “writing”.
I mostly write in Russian; when I feel the need to do it in English, I ask my colleague Jim for help in proof-reading (this might be called “improve-reading” as well).
I have an adorable husband and two kids (reminder: update when necessary) who are, simultaneously, an endless source of inspiration and the black hole eating my time.
But what else would I need time for?

What inspires you to write?
My kids, of course! I like so much when my daughter reads my books from Kindle in the dark while I nurse her brother to sleep.
Now, when I became a published author and read more and more feedback from readers, other kids inspire me as well.

Tell us about your writing process.
Normally I think about the book for years, then sit down and draw/ write it really fast. And then I try to find time to edit it and clean up for years again.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Oops. No, I don’t talk to them. But I make faces when I draw them:)

What advice would you give other writers?
Earlier I thought that marketing is a boring and kind of unnecessary part of writer’s work, now I consider it exciting and very important.
Think of book writing as of pregnancy and birth. I think it is amazing and adore both, but then you have to bring your kid up, socialize him, etc. That’s book marketing in my metaphore.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Just went to Amazon and stay there. I believe there are better ways, but for now it is okay for me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I am optimistic. I like to think that more and more people will buy cheaply electronic books, not steal them – with the time that will marginalize piracy.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Children’s

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Tanja Russita Home Page Link
Link To Tanja Russita Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Irene Keller

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About Irene Keller:
My name is Irene Keller and I was born on the 28th of July 1997 which means I’ve just turned eighteen. Through my entire life I have been turned to books and languages rather than other things children played with and developed an early interest in writing around the age of seven. Usually writing poems about abstract things I was a part of this children poets club at the local library. I have a younger brother who I strive to inspire as much as I can and he presents one of the closest people to me. I attend the Stream of Philology in the local Grammar School and hopefully will major in English next year and go to The Faculty of Philosophy and get a degree in English Language and Literature. Hopefully by then I shall be an author already.

What inspires you to write?
It’s very hard to explain this matter because inspiration comes when you least expect it. Something as absorbing, which meddles with your mind in still, scientifically unexplained, ways, is definitely a thing you find difficulty explaining. There is a poet Laza Kostić wrote ‘Tween Wakefulness and the Dream trying to explain and I think that poem really put inspiration into perspective for me. So without many words of mine I shall rely on this poet to explain:
Oh, heart of mine, alone standing,
Who has called you to my home?
you tireless dreaming-knitter,
knitting from a quite thin fiber
‘tween wakefulness and the dream.

Oh, heart of mine, heart demented,
with this knitting, what do you mean?
Like the knitting of the old maids,
what the day knits, the night unbraids,
‘tween wakefulness and the dream.

Oh, heart of mine, heart resentful,
may ‘bolt take you from this realm,
why not let me while still living,
discern yourself in the knitting
‘tween wakefulness and the dream!

Translated by Slobodan Cekic

Tell us about your writing process.
Well, another tough one, if I am very inspired I can write sitting on a rock in 50 degrees Celsius wearing a winter coat and if I am not inspired no bed is comfortable enough and no silence is silent enough.
Joking…my writing process usually takes part in the morning and I do it at my desk because I find difficulty writing in bed or anywhere where I’m not sitting in a chair.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Well I have a conversation or two…or, you know, ten with each of them during the day as well as reenacting their conversations in my head…or actually, just in case.

What advice would you give other writers?
I would say – Write whatever makes you feel like you’re doing the right thing and somebody out there will like it.
And a quote I’ve seen somewhere on the internet ”A year from now you will wish you had started now.”

How did you decide how to publish your books?
It was all a big joke until me and my boyfriend sat down and realized that that big joke was exactly what we should do.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Well I don’t think books will ever go out of style, there is something about them that is eternal.

What do you use?: Co-writer

What genres do you write?: science fiction, fiction, juvenile fiction, teen fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Irene Keller Home Page Link
Link To Irene Keller Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Sharon Struth

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About Sharon Struth:
Sharon Struth is an award-winning author who believes it’s never too late for a second chance in love or life. When she’s not writing, she and her husband happily sip their way through the scenic towns of the Connecticut Wine Trail. Sharon writes from the small town of Bethel, Connecticut, the friendliest place she’s ever lived.

What inspires you to write?
Writing is a second career for me. I took an adult education writing class on a whim. Suddenly saw what I’d been missing my entire life, and forcing me to admit that a story-teller has always lived inside me. Now that I’ve given myself permission to do this, everything I see spurs my creative juices.

Tell us about your writing process.
Before I start a book, I write out detailed character profiles. These include appearance, quirks, education, jobs, family, parents backgrounds. Then I think about what their goals are for the story, why they are motivated to achieve that goal and what will get in the way of achieving that goal. I loosely plot the story, at least the start of it, but it usually takes on a life of it’s own at the keyboard. So I sort consider myself somewhere in between a person who writes by the seat of my pants and outliner.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I truly listen to my characters. Sometimes I’m typing–with a very clear direction–and the POV character just goes in this totally different place. I’m dumbfounded when this happens, but usually let it ride for a while. Do I talk to them, though? Not really, but I do talk to my dog.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you love writing, then keep at and do everything possible to learn the craft. Learn to accept criticism, because if you can’t, you will never get better. This is probably the hardest thing to understand, but getting feedback is important. Get test readers, find critique groups. You don’t have to listen to every bit of advice, but you do need to listen if you keep hearing the same thing over and over. And really, don’t ask your family…they may not be honest. Just remember, you may be in a rush to get your name on a book, but don’t you want there to be quality behind what others will read?

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I am happy to say I was committed to two things in my writing career. First, before having a novel published, I wrote non-fiction essays and vowed never to give away my work for free. Every non-fiction piece I have published, I have received proudly received a paycheck. And second, I always knew that I wanted to start with traditional publishing. It mattered to me that professionals in the field believed strongly enough in my work to accept it. Plus, over the years of working with publishers, I’ve learned a great deal about the book business.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think we will see the balance of eBooks and print books settle in a place where they both exist comfortably.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: contemporary, women’s fiction, romance, suspense.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Sharon Struth Home Page Link
Link To Sharon Struth Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Barbara J. Rebbeck

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About Barbara J. Rebbeck:
I’ve been a writing teacher for many years, helping students of all ages write and publish and win awards. When I retired, I decided to give myself those same opportunities so I wrote my first YA novel, NOLA Gals. Now I’m back in classes working with kids as a visiting writer. It is very rewarding and often moving to see how much kids love my book and all its characters, especially old George, the skinny poodle. Besides writing, I love to read, of course, I also love to travel to London, England where my dad was born. I love to visit historic old castles and stately homes and see as many plays as possible while there. I was lucky enough to see Highclere Castle where the series DOWNTON ABBEY is filmed on my last trip. I have a huge collection of British royalty mugs, plates and dolls. I just bought a mug for little Princess Charlotte’s birth. I live by myself with my cat, Gracie. And yes, she is named after Grace from my book, NOLA GALS..

What inspires you to write?
I was first inspired to write by a great English teacher I had in 7th, 8th and 9th grade, Mrs. Hartwig. We had to write a composition every week and she would read the best ones to the class. I was always proud when she read mine aloud. As an adult, I was inspired to write my book, NOLA GALS after watching all the coverage of the destruction by Hurricane Katrina ten years ago. I wanted to write a book I could take into classes so young kids would learn about this disastrous storm and also read about the racial prejudice that still exists in our country while they also learned some new writing techniques.

Tell us about your writing process.
I listen to my characters. The first one from NOLA GALS who began talking to me, usually when I was trying to fall asleep, was Mimmi. I could see and hear her jabbering away as stubborn as a mule. I’m not an outliner. I may jot down notes as I go. My first steps are research. I did weeks of reading and watching documentaries before and during the writing of my book. And sometimes I would think I was done with a chapter and something new would pop up. For instance, I was watching a PBS series on old houses, and they featured an old house in New Orleans so back I went to the very first chapter to add details about the old house the girls lived in. It’s a circular process of on-going researching, writing and revising with the characters always leading the way.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
As I said before, I listen to my characters. I’ve given up on outlines because invariably, the characters take off in a different direction. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is a very important book for my two main characters, Grace and Essence. But it wasn’t at first, not until Grace met the evacuees from Hurricane Katrina at the Astrodome in Houston. Then she let me know the novel would guide them through their struggles.

What advice would you give other writers?
Writers must be readers. Research the genre you hope to write and read, read, read. I keep up with all the hot new YA novels. I’m all over the internet now on a lot of social sites. I stay in touch with teens in classrooms and online. You should be able to name your favorite writers in your genres. Then write, write, write. Keeping a journal is a big help, too. Jot down ideas, weird people you meet, odd places, etc. You never know what you can use in your writing. Join a writers’ group if you’re ready to share your work and get some constructive criticism. It’s always good to have objective eyes on your work, not just your mom who will love everything you write. There are also great workshops you can go to. Check them out online and join some of the online writing support groups.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
It was a very tough battle to get NOLA GALS in print. I sent out query letters (I hate them!) and got lots of rejections. Many agents or publishers told me my book concept was “not on their list” whatever that means. After a few years of rejection, a friend of mine had luck publishing with a small press. She urged me to continue my search for an agent, but I was so frustrated by that time I decided to investigate small presses. I assumed that would be an easy route, Not so fast. More rejections followed until I finally landed a spot for my book with a small press. I was pleased that they saw in my book what I loved, and the experience has been a good one. With a small press, their resources are limited so you have to do a lot of promotion on your own. I’m becoming an expert at all the resources available online for authors to help get the word out about a new book. You do not receive an advance to help with expenses from a small press, but you do get royalties. Two big thrills are opening the first box of your own book you get in the and then later looking at that first royalty check. Beware of the scams out there. The website Preditors and Editors does a good job of warning authors about possible scams.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I sometimes fear for the future for writers. True there are many roads available for writers from self-publishing to the big New York publishers, but the frustrations are many and you have to be tough. When you get that first one-star review, you have to pick yourself up and read the good ones again. When the big book stores refuse to carry your small press novel, you have to seek out the independent bookstores who will. When the big city newspapers, turn you down, go to the small local papers. Be tough and you can survive. I am buoyed by working in classrooms with young students who love to read and write. When a 6th grader asks for your autograph with tears in her eyes and whispers that she’s never met a real author before, you have to have hope for a future for readers and writers.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: YA fiction, essay, poetry, memoir

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Barbara J. Rebbeck Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Lindsey Stuffel

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About Lindsey Stuffel:
I’m a small town girl, and an introvert with a big imagination. I learned early-on that writing was the perfect outlet for my situation. Once I wrote my first book, I never looked back. I’m now preparing to release my 4th novel, with a 5th already in the works. Someday, I’d like to establish my own imprint and help other writers like me with the publishing process.

What inspires you to write?
My inspiration usually comes from small things. It could be a look somebody gives me from which I end up building an entire scene. Occasionally that scene blossoms into an entire story. Inspiration is everywhere if you know where to look. I once wrote an entire chapter because I stepped on a crunchy leaf.

Tell us about your writing process.
Once I get an idea in my head I open a word document and start typing. I name my characters and describe their traits and physical appearances. Typically a plot will begin to form while I’m doing that, and I write an extremely rough outline. Then, I start with chapter 1 and let my characters and the story take me where they want to go. Once my rough draft is done, I do one re-write while formatting the book interior, and then two more read-throughs before I’m satisfied the story is finished. I’ve learned over the years my outlines are completely useless because I never stick to them, but they’re still part of my process.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters tell me where they’re going. In my head, they’re real people. I love them, and I miss them when they’re gone. I feel sad when one of them dies, I feel guilt when innocent people are hurt as a result of their actions.

What advice would you give other writers?
Don’t worry about the opinions of others. You will anyway, but if you can let the criticism roll off your back, you’ll be a stronger writer.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I sent my first novel out to a few publishers and agents with no nibbles. My extreme impatience led me to CreateSpace, and I’ve been using them for my self-publishing needs ever since.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think self-publishing is gaining ground, but the traditional houses aren’t going anywhere. I’m excited to see what the world of self-publishing has in store in the next 5-10 years.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Literary Fiction, Women’s Fiction, Middle Grade Fiction

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lindsey Stuffel Home Page Link
Link To Lindsey Stuffel Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – B. L. Pride

About B. L. Pride:
B. L. Pride is a team of two best friends from Maribor, Slovenia. They’ve got a lot in common, but their love for books, stories, and new worlds they explore and inhabit constantly has brought them even closer together. The venture that started with Barbara’s decision she would stop fighting her wish to write hit a whole new dimension when Lea read what her best friend had written. The decision was not an easy one, but it was made eventually – and L. started to translate their first work, now titled Addiction (Book One, Beyond Life Series). There have been a whole bunch of ups and downs ever since, but they didn’t quit. Now they have just published the first book of a new series, Addiction is getting re-edited, and Insanity (Book Two, Beyond Life Series) is waiting to be published alongside Addiction.
The answers in this interview are B’s :)

What inspires you to write?
My writing is a combination of various elements, and I feel that there is so much of everything that can be used as a source of inspiration. I pick up tiny bits and pieces from all around – cooking, playing with my kids, driving to work, talking to people … But those are just moments, sometimes seemingly insignificant details. For me, one of the most important layers of a novel is the emotional world of the characters. I love it when a book feels so real I shiver or hold my breath, I love it when I get mad at a character despite knowing I’d do the exact same idiocy … And I love to write about it. I think most of the emotional states, situations, and reactions in my books have been inspired by music – there are moments in my books that are very detailed transcripts of what a song makes me feel. So … yes, I guess I could say that music is my most important source of inspiration.

Tell us about your writing process.
The writing process … It starts before the actual writing. When the idea is moulded to the point where I know it will work, I start writing. Since my novels have a strong fantasy twist in its core, I always have to figure out that first. I let everything else evolve during the actual writing, but the fantasy twist has to be thoroughly thought out.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I never talk to my characters. I watch them perform. Really. There are movies in my head.

What advice would you give other writers?
If anything, I need advice myself. :) But the good old cliche that should never be a cliche, the one about never giving up, seems to be extremely useful in the life of an author. Write. Work. Edit. Proofread. Edit. Rewrite. Etc. But never give up, if this is what you want to do. If it’s not something you enjoy immensely, it’s too much hard work to bother.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I was forced to do it. Lea, who is the other half of B. L. Pride team, made me do it. As you can read in the author’s bio, B. L. Pride is a team of two people. I never thought about publishing anything. I wrote the first series in Slovene, and when L. read it, she started convincing me to do something with it. I think I gave a pretty good struggle, but she managed to convince me when she suggested she would translate it in English. I mean, her kids were one and five years old at the time, and we all know that a woman is pretty busy in a situation like that. The fact that she was actually willing to take on such a huge responsibility (not to mention hard work) convinced me that she believed it the story.
Things have changed considerably since then. I started writing my new series in English, and L. is still translating the series.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I have to admit that my understanding of book publishing is pretty poor as it is. Living in Slovenia and being a paperback addict, I spend way too much money in my favorite bookstore, and until I was told about amazon, kindle, and all the other wonders of modern era, I had no particular interest in these ‘wonders of the modern era’. So believe me, I am the last person to predict anything about it. However, I think that indie authors will rule the world eventually, of course. :)

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: dark romance, paranormal romance, mystery

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
B. L. Pride Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – M Thomas Apple

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About M Thomas Apple:
Originally from Troy, New York, M. Thomas Apple spent part of his childhood in a tiny hamlet in the Helderbergs and his teenage years in a slightly larger village in the Adirondacks of Upstate New York. He played high school baseball for four years and was a decent base-stealer, adequate outfielder, and terrible batter. Occasionally he dreams about the sole (running) homerun he hit on a 3-0 count, and the subsequent beaning that followed during the next at-bat.

He studied languages and literature as an undergraduate student at Bard College and later creative writing at the University of Notre Dame du Lac, where he wrote a controversial, award-winning weekly column for the student-run daily newspaper, The Observer, while composing the initial draft of what would become Approaching Twi-Night. A non-fiction collection of essays (Taking Leave: An American on Paternity Leave in Japan) is due to be released in September, 2015 (Perceptia Press), a collection of his short fiction and poetry (Notes from the Nineties) is due to be published in early 2016.
After further studies at Temple University, he now teaches global issues and English as a second language at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan. He lives in a house co-designed with his wife and partially decorated by his two daughters, nestled in the foothills of the mountains and surrounded by lots and lots of Japanese cedar and cicada.

What inspires you to write?
In general, I’m inspired by life around me. That sounds corny, and perhaps a bit obvious. But whenever I’m on the train to work, I imagine what it would be like to live in the towns the train travels through, what it would be like to be a certain person I see reading a newspaper or listening to music, what kind of background would be behind conversations I happen to overhear. Sometimes I’m inspired by political events. Sometimes I’m inspired by scientific discoveries. Or something I saw in a history documentary. It all depends on the world around me, and how much I can jot down before the memory fades.

Tell us about your writing process.
Originally I simply wrote whatever came into my mind. That seemed to work OK for a while. But as I began to be interested in more complicated plot and character development, I realized that it took a whole lot of extra editing to smooth out differences and contradictions that emerged along the way. Lately, I’ve shifted to a more outline-synposis-character bio approach. I first write out ideas in Word, and then once I’ve got something worked out, I switch it all over to Scrivener. If I happen to run into a writer’s impasse moment, I tend to print things out and scribble all over for a while until some new idea presents itself. Even when outlining and etc, though, I’m not afraid to let my characters take over the action and blow the outline to smithereens.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I certainly do listen to my characters! It does take some writing before they speak. At one point in Approaching Twi-Night, as I was drafting one specific scene in a bar, one of the character suddenly got so bored he decided to leave! I had typed it all out before I was even aware that the character had “spoken” to me as much as to the other characters.

What advice would you give other writers?
More than anything, when somebody tells you “write what you know,” my advice is to totally ignore them. Write what you *want* to know. Do research. Read lots of background material. Go to physical locations and take photos. Draw pictures. Type like mad and then delete most (or all) of it. Have a plan, but don’t hesitate to go off into unexplored territory. Creativity should flow unrestricted. You can always go back later and edit!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Basically, I gave up trying to publish with established publishers, because my book was not easy to fit into a specific genre. It’s literary, but it’s about baseball. In the end, I was inspired by a former college classmate who had successfully self-published over a dozen SF and fantasy novels. It seemed “easy” (it’s not!), so I decided to give it a try.

I can’t advise authors to go for the traditional press route or to self-publish, because I’m still new at this myself. I would say, though, that both methods have benefits. Self-publishing is an awful lot of work, but it’s hard to get published otherwise. My only advice would be to keep as many options open as possible.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
“The death of print books has been greatly exaggerated.” (as some famous writer might have said, but didn’t). People have been saying for years now that ebooks were going to dominate the market and that print books would disappear. I don’t see that happening. Fiction, especially general fiction (i.e., non-genre), is still sold mostly in print form, in physical bookstores. It does seem, however, that online retailers such as Amazon will continue to force smaller independent bookstores out of business. I certainly hope that that will not come to pass; I support independent bookstores, even though it means that (due to my living in Japan) I have a harder time getting books I want. It would be dangerous if we had to rely on a handful of monopolistic companies for our reading material.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: General fiction, literary fiction, science fiction, non-fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
M Thomas Apple Home Page Link
Link To M Thomas Apple Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Mr. Mandingo

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About Mr. Mandingo:
Mr. Mandingo is an author that is here to bring you the ancient African Kemetic secrets that will allow men to enhance their lives. Sometimes men overlook the fact they can always enhance their quality of life. Most men just accept certain things about their life, that if they took the time to change, it would make their life better. Mr. Mandingo felt it necessary to bring out unknown and secret teachings that originate from the Motherland Africa, the cradle of humanity and bring them to the public, in order to help men all over the world.

What inspires you to write?
I like to bring out information that has been hidden from the public.Being able able to find information that is lost or purposely undisclosed is what I like to research and write about.

Tell us about your writing process.
I just start writing. There is o special process other I write out an outline with chapter headings and then I go and fill those individual chapters with the most relevant information I can find.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to publish my books because they are not traditional type of books. I want my books to be different than others. I want my readers to come away from my books saying I didn’t know that.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the future is bright for book publishing books it is so much easier now than it was not too long ago.

What genres do you write?: Ancient History, Black History, Men’s Health, Dating, Sex

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Mr. Mandingo Home Page Link
Link To Mr. Mandingo Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
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All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Tory C Anderson

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About Tory C Anderson:
Although an avid reader all of his life, Tory Anderson didn’t discover the magic of writing
until he was in college. By the time he graduated with a master’s degree in English he had plans
of doing nothing but writing for a living. However, his own story had surprises in store. The need
to support a wife and eight children distracted him from writing for many years. All the stories
he read, and still reads, to his children inspired him to pick up the pen once more. He lives in Levan, Utah, with his
wife and children.

What inspires you to write?
The power of books continually amazes me. Superheroes are often created when some radioactive substance mutates them. Books are the radioactive substance in my life. They have changed me into a better, more powerful being. I want to be that kind of power in the lives of others. I can’t imagine a greater high than what comes after writing a beautiful scene.

Tell us about your writing process.
My stories gestate inside me like a baby until they are ready to burst out like Alien. If I could outline on paper I would because it seems that would make writing easier. Unfortunately, to attempt to outline on paper stops my creative process. I find that I have to busy myself with other things when I need to figure something out and let the crystals form in the dark. Eventually I sit down, let the sunlight in and see what I have. The sunlight through the crystals is a beautiful thing. This sounds very random, but something difficult to explain is guiding the process.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I’ve never talked to my characters themselves, but I talk to my beta readers about them as if they are living friends or acquaintances of mine.

What advice would you give other writers?
All writers want as large as audience as they can get. This is natural and right. Even so, your most important audience is yourself. I believe this is a deep truth. If your writing does not share your heartbeat it doesn’t live. Write the book that you want to read even if you think a publisher won’t take it. Even if you try to write for the publisher they may not take the book and then you are left with nothing to be proud of.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
There is a certain prestige to being able to drop the name of a traditional publisher. Like most unpublished authors I believed that being picked up by a traditional publisher meant automatic success. I’ve learned that is far from true. A miniscule number of authors are accepted by traditional publishers, and an even smaller number see success after that. Traditional publishers publish what they think will sell despite the quality of the literature. I’m an educated reader. I know what I like. I write books influenced by those books. I bring in educated beta readers and skilled editors (traditional publishers can’t corner that area) to ensure the quality of the final product. I study book covers on the market that excite me and hire a designer to help me meet that standard. With all the online guides, formatting a book to the industry standard is not difficult. Rather than knock myself out against the walls of publishing house (or an agent) I independently publish and let my books see the light of day. I have a small, but growing audience. If I was playing the traditional publisher’s game the odds tell me that I would have no audience and little hope. Check out Hugh Howey’s story. That kind of success won’t happen often, but it’s far more likely than with the traditional publisher game.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Traditional publishers won’t go away, and that is a good thing. But the advent of independent publishing has stood the industry on its head. That is a fantastic thing. Talent that would never see the light of day is accessible to the world. Independent publishing has made the world freer and more beautiful. The hope that independent publishing gives to writers will encourage future literary giants that otherwise would have suffocated.

What do you use?: Professional Editor

What genres do you write?: general fiction, juvenile fiction, young adult fiction,

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Tory C Anderson Home Page Link
Link To Tory C Anderson Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Raven Oak

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About Raven Oak:
Raven Oak is the author of the bestselling fantasy novel Amaskan’s Blood, the bestselling science fiction novella Class-M Exile, and the upcoming space opera The Eldest Silence. She spent most of her K-12 education doodling stories and 500-page monstrosities that are forever locked away in a filing cabinet.

When she’s not writing, she’s getting her game on with tab-letop and console games, indulging in cartography, or staring at the ocean. She lives in Seattle, WA with her husband, and their three kitties who enjoy lounging across the keyboard when writing deadlines approach.

Raven is currently at work on Amaskan’s War and The Eldest Traitor.

What inspires you to write?
Everything from the man with scuffed dress shoes standing at the corner to the hungry kitten in a box.

Tell us about your writing process.
When I first started writing full time, I spent about 6 hours a day writing, which resulted in two novels finished in a span of 3 months. It was grueling and by the end of it, I was drained. Now, I break up my time and try to balance it all a bit more.
I spent my writing time doing five things: writing, editing/revising, critiquing, researching, and networking/promoting.
The first two of that list make up about 85% of my time, and I put in 7-8 hours a day into the ‘job.’
Monday through Friday, I spent my mornings writing and my afternoons editing/revising. I check my email and do whatever networking and promoting is needed after I have spent at least 7 hours on the writing and editing portions. Social networking can be a great place to promote your material, which is important, but it can also suck you into wasting time. On the weekends, I put in 3-4 hours total on critiquing novels and short stories from the members of my local critique group. I also try to write at least 15 minutes on Saturday and Sunday. And that’s my week.
I even write on Christmas day.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to my characters so much as talk to myself. I think out loud. I question the wall. I interrogate my brain until I get what I need.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write. Every. Day.
Butt in chair is how you do it. No excuses.
We all have busy lives–family, possibly another job, whatever. Demands on our time don’t go away with a publishing contract. If you aren’t willing to write when and where you can, you’ll struggle to get the results you want.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I like the flexibility the small press and self-publishing can provide that a large publisher does not. Large publishers don’t necessarily guarantee a large advance or a blockbuster book. I think good writing and exposure does more than a large publisher can or will.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the big 5 have shot themselves in the foot. They’re drowning in a sea of options by their own devices. I suspect that smaller publishing houses will re-emerge as the better way to be published. Self-publishing options will also grow, giving authors more say in what happens with their creations.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Fantasy & Science Fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Raven Oak Home Page Link
Link To Raven Oak Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Michael Rossi

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About Michael Rossi:
Michael Rossi’s new memoir, Off The Reservation: Stories I Almost Took to the Grave and Probably Should Have, is his debut book. Equal parts moving and shocking, these stranger than fiction stories are an honest account of an incredible life–not an incredibly good life, but an extremely unlikely one, and at times an utterly disastrous existence. Michael is the father of two wonderful children, and currently lives in St. Louis, Missouri with his girlfriend and her animals.

What inspires you to write?
I have always been a writer obsessed with true stories. It took some courage, but I was finally able to honestly tell my story of insanity in a way people could understand. I am continually inspired by how good it feels to do so.

Tell us about your writing process.
I like to outline my chapters first, and then focus on them one at a time. I re-write several times as I go.

What advice would you give other writers?
Make sure you write everyday. Spend the money required on an editor and cover artist. Have plenty of beta-readers, and be ready to listen to feedback.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Self publishing my book was a no-brainer!

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the democratization of books, started by Amazon, will continue. I believe everyone will eventually read mostly ebooks.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Memoir

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Michael Rossi Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.