Interview with Author – Sarah Jo Smith

About Sarah Jo Smith:
I’m the author of contemporary women’s novels The Other Side of Heartache, a semi-finalist in The Kindle Book Review 2013 Best Indie Book Awards for Literary Fiction, and my newest release, Entangled Loyalties (2016). A lifelong reader, I’ve had a book in my hands since my grandmother Rosie taught me to read at the age of five. Victorian literature was a favorite genre of study and I’m a big fan of North American writers such as Willa Cather, Edith Wharton, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, and Anne Tyler. Two novels that have influenced me greatly are The Bluest Eye and East of Eden.
My novels delve into the female journey and the healing power of family. I write stories where women characters face unexpected challenges and, through their struggles, emerge stronger and with a better understanding of themselves. I believe women will never stop reading books when they can relate to characters and gain insight into their own lives. I hope my novels are those kinds of books.
I was born in Los Angeles and raised in a high desert town in southern California. A former English teacher, I hold a bachelor’s degree in English from California Lutheran University, a single subject teaching credential in English, and a master’s degree in education from Santa Clara University. I have stories in Chicken Soup for the Soul books for the Adopted Soul, My Resolution, Teens Talk High School, and Say Goodbye to Stress.
As the mother of three adults, I live in picturesque Bend, Oregon with my husband, Gregg, of 35 years. When I’m not reading or writing, hiking or snowshoeing in the Cascade Mountains, you’ll find me on the pickleball courts.

What inspires you to write?
Toni Morrison said, “If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” My novels, THE OTHER SIDE OF HEARTACHE and ENTANGLED LOYALTIES are results of that advice.

Tell us about your writing process.
I wrote a brief outline for both novels. I knew how I wanted the stories to begin and how I thought they would end, but each time the endings surprised me. The characters changed during the writing process, grew in unexpected ways, and when they didn’t react or conform as I expected, the ending had to be different than the outline. One exciting part about being a writer is there’s a point in the story, usually early on, when the characters you’ve created develop a separate personality and they no longer think, act, or speak through the author’s voice, and they demand to be heard. When the writer doesn’t listen, the story doesn’t work.
I make sketches of all my characters and include a picture of what I perceive them to look like, which I keep in the novel’s computer file. During the writing process, I often look at the pictures and review my notes to make sure the characters are staying true to their personalities.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Not only do I listen to my characters, during a long writing day I find myself immersed deeply in their lives to the point that I think as they do; I become them, experience their emotions, their struggles. Finally, when I leave my desk, turn off the light, and close my office door, it takes me several minutes to return to the real world; to become me again.
I interact with my characters by trying to figure out what they would do or say in a scene. When I keep erasing a dialog, deleting their reaction to something, I have to stop, take a walk, and think of something else. This is when I figure out the reason I’m not able to write the scene is because I’m forcing a character to react a certain way, and she/he is resisting me because that’s not what she/he would do. It’s what I want her/him to do. When I step aside and really listen to my character, I’m able to write a believable passage, staying true to her or his personality.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write your story. Then rewrite, rewrite, and rewrite. When you’re not writing, read, read, read.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After receiving many rejections from literary agencies while seeking representation and, although coming close on a few occasions to being accepted, the answers were still no. I checked out Kindle self-publishing and decided to give this method a try. I became a KDP Select author and I’m pleased with my book sales and the reviews I’ve gained for both novels.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
While people may always enjoy the feel of a paperback or a hardback book in their hands, and I don’t think that will ever change, reading on mobile devices is on the rise. For example, a Kindle is easy to read, to carry, and you can download as many books as you like, all bundled into one small device.</p>
<p>Indie authors have a great deal of power in the industry today because of the many choices they have on how to publish. New and better ways to market their books in order to reach their target audiences are being created as a result.

What genres do you write?: Women’s literary fiction

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Sarah Jo Smith Home Page Link
Link To Sarah Jo Smith Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Carl McKever

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About Carl McKever:
Carl McKever was born and raised in Fort Lauderdale, Florida by two lovely parents. Being the middle child, with one younger brother and one older sister, and the firstborn son, he was named after his father. McKever was raised as a Pentecostal under Church of God headquartered in Cleveland, Tennessee. A few months before graduating from high school, Carl discover an unique calling and gift upon his life; the gift of writing. Since 2007, he has written seven books of poetry, short stories, articles, and blogs. His writings have been published in many periodicals, newspapers, and magazines from colleges and universities. His knack and passion for writing is contagious and rubs off on his close friends and family.

What inspires you to write?
Many things have inspired me to write. My main inspiration comes from God. Outside of Him, comes my family, close friends, and personal experiences. I decided to name my books “Poetic Expressions” because the writings display my expressions as a writer. Just like many writers, I’m inspired to write to self-heal and help others. I want my experiences to be applied to another’s life and used to help them through their current situation(s) in life.

Tell us about your writing process.
Preparation to writing involves preparing my mind. Our brain is capable of receiving a billion thoughts in a day. It takes practice to learn how to cultivate the thoughts a writer wants to use in their writing process. Personally, I like to play soft jazz or classic music prior to writing. I give myself a head massage and I close my eyes. I take myself to another world. I think of a word, place, or scene and begin brainstorming. As I brainstorming, I write down what comes across my mind. The things I miss are recorded. Keep a recorder close! Recite phrases and thoughts which come to your mind and record them so you can come back to them later.

Once I compiled enough data, I follow an outlining process to put all of my scenes together.

What advice would you give other writers?
Never stop writing! Before publishing a book, ask for experiences from other authors and understand the writing journey requires a sacrifice of time, health, and money. A successful author is not one who wakes up one day and says, “I’m going to write a book”. Perfecting and editing your writing takes time and don’t take negative criticism so personal. Even the best of books have grammatical errors or lack of word flow. Believe in yourself and know what you want out of writing. Analyze your passion and assess the risks/costs before moving forward.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self-published my books and did not take time to learn the publishing process. I regret this daily. As an Indie author, I encourage you to do an electronic version of your book first (e-book) and see how sales go. If sales are low, revise your manuscript until enough people buy your book. Then, go into Print-On-Demand. If you chose to work with a press or agent, clearly define (in black and white) what you want and expect in your agreement or contract.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
As technology increases, the demand for electronic books increase. I think, each author and reader, needs to stay knowledgeable about the societal issues of publishing a book and the marketing tactics to get people to buy books.

What genres do you write?: Poetry, Short Story, Free Verse, Freelance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Carl McKever Home Page Link
Link To Carl McKever Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Theresa Shaver

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About Theresa Shaver:
Theresa Shaver lives in South Central Alberta Canada.
As an avid reader, I used to dream about writing and sharing my own stories with the world. Publishing was a far off and intimidating goal until Amazon opened the gates! I love that I get real feed back from my fans on my books instead of some guy behind a desk who studies market trends. I write to share my dreams with the world and now I can. My first series is a Young Adult Post-apocalypse story. I love writing about the growth of characters faced with such huge challenges and plan to continue future stories in wrecked worlds. It’s a new do it yourself world in so many industries so never stop believing in your dreams and do it yourself!

What inspires you to write?
As an avid reader I would gobble up books so fast that I would be waiting FOREVER for the next in the series. And waiting, and waiting, and waiting! I had to do something with all that waiting so I started making up my own stories in my head and then I started writing them down and VOILA! a book is born.
I love writing about wrecked worlds where people are forced to dig deep to survive.

Tell us about your writing process.
SEAT OF MY PANTS!
I don’t outline at all. I cascade write and don’t ever go back and reread or edit until it’s done. Then it hurts to clean up all the mistakes but that’s my style. I have a story to tell and stopping to go and fix commas or mistakes pulls me from the flow of the story so it can all wait!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I go soooo deep sometimes. I have one character that flows so naturally for me that when she’s mad I end up pounding the words on my keyboard. I once had a chapter that I bawled all the way through as I wrote it because it hurt so much.
Another time I was so deep in the story that my hands flew off the keyboard in shock when one of my main characters died. I had no plans for that to happen but the story was telling it’s self and then I pouted for an hour but decided it had to be that way.
If you truly feel the story, you will FEEL it and it will just flow!

What advice would you give other writers?
WRITE,WRITE,WRITE!!!
Just keep telling your story. Marketing and promotion is a must but it can’t be your main focus. If you want to sell more book, then write more books!
Be objective when you get bad reviews…and you will. Take what they say and use it to be a better writer and then toss the negativity out the window.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Amanda Hocking. She was my inspiration to self publish. I read an article about this girl who wrote a bunch of books and kept getting rejected by the big NY publishers. She finally said screw it and self-published. Over a million sales later, guess who came knocking at her door asking to publish her?
I had these stories in my head but was too scared of the rejection game to ever move forward with them. Her story made me think, “What do I have to lose?”
Now I’m sooo thankful I never tried for NY. I get paid way more than they would pay me and I control EVERYTHING from the price of the book to how many a year I want to publish. Best decision I have ever made!

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it is evolving so fast. A few years ago writers and readers where at the mercy and control of the big NY 5 but self publishing kicked those gates down and opened up a huge world for both. I think that more and more authors will self publish and with all the amazing author services out there for cover design and editing it will just get bigger and bigger as NY gets a smaller potion of the market.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: YA-teen, Science Fiction, Survival, Action Adventure

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Theresa Shaver Home Page Link
Link To Theresa Shaver Page On Amazon

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Jay Harris

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About Jay Harris:
Jay Harris is the author of the top ranked novel, Locked Up, a Shawshank Redemption meets The Matrix story that redefines what it means to be human.

He’s a husband and a father here upon this earth and that’s his primary focus. Off the earth, in places he can’t mention, he’s many other things, one of which is a super powered muscle man.

Jay lives a modest life with his beautiful wife and daughter. He loves basketball, working out, and spending time with family. He has a creative mind and uses writing to put his awesomeness on paper.

Science fiction and fantasy is Jay’s primary love, but anything with a good, positive vibe can pull in his attention. He likes books with an uplifting and encouraging concept, even if it’s hinted in a sub-plot.

His main reason for writing is to inspire his daughter to love books. He talks about plot points and character development with her to help her be a part of the process. He simply wants to help her love reading and writing.

What inspires you to write?
My daughter is what inspires me to write. She’s a little tornado in my life that I love with my entire soul. Her education is something I value, and there’s nothing more important than reading. I write to hopefully inspire her to do the same one day. I talk with her about the books as I go and listen to her ideas. Watching the wheels turn as we push the limits of her crazy imagination is my biggest reward.

Tell us about your writing process.
My process for writing is a rigorous array of not sleeping and talking too much about the plot with friends. Thoughts keep flowing into my mind. I spend a good chunk of time outlining certain plot points, but the overall formation of sub-plots and such is something I let happen naturally. If I’m really deep into a manuscript you’ll often see me waking up to email myself because I had a thought I don’t want to forget.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I learn to love my characters as the process goes on. Their differences are important to me, as I don’t want every character to feel the same. Also, I value realistic details and reality based interaction. Not everyone’s body is perfect, and not every relationship is flowers and chocolates. Some characters need to have flaws or the reader won’t relate.

What advice would you give other writers?
You can’t please everyone, so don’t try. Write what you love, and let everything else happen as it will. You can be the biggest, juiciest peach on the tree, but that means very little to someone that doesn’t like peaches. Just write what you want.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Self-publishing has both positive and negative aspects. I like the idea of writing on my own schedule and formulating my manuscript as I see fit. Nonetheless, I’d love to have the assistance of a publishing company to help me grow and cast a wider net for readers. I believe working with a publishing company can hold a value in overall growth and marketing ability.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The future of book publishing is dependent upon the readers. If the market for self-published authors continues to grow then publishing companies will have to adapt. Quality controls will always have to be in place when it comes to private publishing. That’s the value in having an agent work to help you grow, but that doesn’t mean an author can’t work independently.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Science Fiction or Fantasy primarily

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Jay Harris Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Norman Turrell

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About Norman Turrell:
I was a passionate reader of science-fiction from an early age. I grew up in the 1970’s, an inspirational time for scientific endeavour. Being mathematical by nature, I had an appetite for computing and completed a degree in the 80’s, going on later to receive an Masters degree in artificial intelligence. I spent a lot of time on my career in software, but in the last four years I have turned to writing creative fiction. Being very practical, I run two writers critique groups which provide invaluable insight into the craft and help me with my efforts. My first book ‘Alice in Virtuality’ was published 2012 and ‘Points of Possibility’ followed in 2016. I write continuously.

What inspires you to write?
Reading and watching great fiction inspires me to create stories of my own. I want to tell stories to entertain, to make people think and imagine.

Tell us about your writing process.
There are three types of writer: the plotter, the ‘pantser’, and a hybrid of the two. The plotter methodically plans. The ‘pantser’ works by the seat of their pants, creating on the fly. I always thought I would be a plotter, having a logical mind. I do to some extent, but not hugely. I guess writing for me is a creative experience that is best done outside my structured approach.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters talk to me in the sense most have very clear personalities and ‘tell’ me whether they fit or don’t fit the actions I am describing them taking. In a way, they stamp their feet and say ‘I’m not doing that’. Quite right they are too.

What advice would you give other writers?
To write, just write. Pour your thoughts, feelings and imagination onto the page continuously. Read everything you can on the techniques of the craft. Join writers groups; you can not work in isolation.

But you probably also want to publish, to be successful in that way. I’m afraid that is very difficult. Persevere, because if its what you want, you must.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My first book was self-published as an experiment in investigating how the process works. My second book was free so I wasn’t interested in trying to get a publisher. My third, a longer novel, will be submitted to publishers as I have found self-publishing to be incredibly difficult to undertake alone. I still expect to have to use the skills I’ve attained with that book also.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think there will be an increase in collaborations of authors, all pursuing self-publishing and who will help each other with marketing. Traditional publishing will remain, but will put more and more pressure on the author to market themselves online and live. The ease of being able distribute will make the market very competitive and only the most dedicated will succeed.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Science-fiction, fantasy, strange

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Norman Turrell Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – L.L. Akers

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About L.L. Akers:
L.L. Akers is originally from the Midwest where she grew up climbing trees, haystacks, and barn lofts–escaping into other worlds with a good book. She now lives in the South, the silly wife of a serious man, and mom of two very gifted and fetching offspring, a chubby beagle that looks astonishingly like a mini-cow, a deranged terrier as well as a herd of tiny but boastful lizards, and dozens of obnoxiously loud serenading frogs.
After a career in human resources, she now pursues life as a writer. She loves dragonflies, staring at word art, and slinging ink. She also enjoys 4-wheelin’, marksmanship shooting, canning fruits and veggies, and studying potential survival situations. Eyes wide open…

What inspires you to write?
I am a survivor. I wanted to use my voice to give other victims hope, via fiction. All my stories have happily ever afters. I’ve written about domestic abuse, sexual abuse, sexual harassment and DID (Disassociative Identity Disorder). I’m also writing a new series about survivors of a country-wide crisis.
I’m inspired by every-day people overcoming huge challenges and finding their own happily ever afters.

Tell us about your writing process.
I started out as a pantser. I wrote Let Me Go (Book 1) in six weeks. That was my debut novel and it’d been bubbling to get out. It took a bit longer to pants Book 2. Then I became an outliner. That process is much smoother, but it takes awhile to plant the corn and let it grow. I define my characters and then they come to me at night (usually keeping me awake) and play out their stories in my head, until my ‘corn’ is grown and the full story is fleshed out. Then I start getting it down in writing.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I do! As I said above, my characters like to show me their stories. I don’t talk to them, but I DO listen.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write every day. If you feel burn-out, don’t just stop. Switch to a new story until you’ve pushed through. Stopping for one or a few days can cause a looooong break; one that is very hard to start from again.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I like to have control over my covers and my stories…as well as my marketing plan. I couldn’t give all that up for a trad published deal.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think eventually, the majority will be self-published.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Women’s Fiction, Romantic Suspense, Erotic Romance, Post Apoc/SciFi

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
L.L. Akers Home Page Link
Link To L.L. Akers Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Debbie Cassidy

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About Debbie Cassidy:
Debbie Cassidy is a 39 year old multi-tasking ninja who lives in England, Bedfordshire, with her three kids and very supportive husband. Coffee and chocolate biscuits are her writing fuels of choice, and she is still working on getting that perfect tower of solitude built in her back garden. Debbie has been writing for eight years under the pen name Amos Cassidy with her best friend, Richard Amos, but Forest of Demons is her first solo venture, and the first book in a four book high fantasy saga.

What inspires you to write?
I get my inspiration from all over the place, the ideas just pop into my head. They come to me in dreams, and when I’m not writing I’m thinking about writing. Forest of Demons was inspired by my dad, but I have written several books under the pen name Amos Cassidy which were inspired by dreams I had, or stray thoughts that just popped into my head.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m a pantser. I tend to spend a week or so with the idea swimming inside my head. I make notes, jot down my thoughts ,and then when I get that click in my mind telling me that I’m ready, then I start to write.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes! All the time! If my characters aren’t speaking to me, taking over, or pushing the boundaries by going off and doing the unexpected then I know the story is faltering. I sometimes find myself lecturing them and other times I spend ages trying to figure out why they just went and did whatever they did, which usually opens up a whole new plot line!

What advice would you give other writers?
Read tons of books, watch tons of movies and write every day. Practice will make you a better author. If you can attend the odd workshop then do so, read books on writing and learn. Writing is a craft that you can hone but you won’t find your voice if you don’t put in the hours. Not every manuscript will be a master piece. Every writer has one, two, or even three manuscripts that will never see the light of day, but that doesn’t make those manuscripts a waste of time, because while writing these manuscripts the authors were learning.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My co-authored books, under the pen name Amos Cassidy, are self published, and I’ve enjoyed learning all about indie publishing. The control you have over your book, pricing, marketing etc…is addictive. For Forest of Demons, my first solo venture, I wanted to try something different, and when I heard about Kindle Scout and Kindle Press I just knew I had to give it a shot. I’m still an indie author, but I also have a publisher which makes me a hybrid author I guess.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I don’t think books will ever go out of fashion, but traditional publishing is becoming more and more unattractive to authors due to the low royalties on offer. I’ve heard of authors turning down traditional contracts in order to become indie authors – more control, higher royalties.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: High Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Post-Apocalyptic

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Debbie Cassidy Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Jan Levine

About Jan Levine:
I am an IT director and digital media manager with a missions organization, where I have served for six years. I also have had a desire to write because I discovered through putting words on paper an absolute freedom to express my heart. After completing a Master of Divinity degree in Messianic Jewish Studies, as well as completed several biblical counseling courses, I published my first book, “Scarred, A Journey of Restoration.” Published July 16th, 2016, I hope and pray that my story touches the lives of those who read it.

What inspires you to write?
I have a lot that wants to come out, and paper gives me a comfortable place to release those things.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am a seat of my pants type of writer. However, when I have played around with my favorite genre “Fantasy,” I have sketched out various characters so that they would come to life.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you enjoy writing, just write! We live in an era where our publication dreams can come true. There are plenty of forums where you can learn everything you need to proceed. Although, I have learned through my very limited experience (only have published one book), don’t believe everything you read. You should call the source to discover the details. I would also recommend, take your time with each choice you make along your process. There is always more than one way to achieve your goal, so be fully informed before moving forward.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I believe this will be unique for each person. For me, I found self-publishing fun because it taught me to value what publication companies go through. I am sure if a publication company liked my work, and wanted to publish me. They would have taught me everything I needed to know. For someone like myself that enjoys hands on learning, though, self-publication is perfect.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I wish I had something to share here, but I am such a new kid on the block that any answer would be made up without any substantial experience to guide my opinion.

What do you use?: Ghostwriter

What genres do you write?: Autobiography, Christian Life

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Jan Levine Home Page Link
Link To Jan Levine Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Lillian Corrigan

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About Lillian Corrigan:
I’m a survivor. I’ve lived through joy as well as tragedy, and writing has been a part of each major event. Only now a published author, I’ve written from a young age, using journaling as a means to cope, learn, and grow from hardship. Writing enabled me to find clarity and understanding when life threw me a curve. Knowing it’s value, I hope to use writing to inspire other people to gain new perspective, better understanding, and more confidence, especially during difficult times.

Growing up in an average suburb, I was quiet and studious. I performed well in school. After winning a class contest allotting a free-pass on a future homework assignment, I saved it as memento, validating my nerd status. As a kid in the summer months, I led my less-interested sisters in games of school, aspiring to become a teacher. A natural math-head, I thrived on those complex problems most kids hated. But to bring my writing skills up to the level I wanted, I took extra English courses in both high school and college. My first love of literature was born after reading “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” in middle school.

At the age of three, I strapped on my first pair of ice skates, and found out about pools via mandatory swim lessons when I was just four. Yet I grew to love the water. Other hobbies included gymnastics, calligraphy, bicycling, puzzles and crafting many self-imagined creations through trial and error. Despite a few disasters, some concoctions came out well. I continue to enjoy the latter three activities, involving calamities as well as successes. Cooking, spending a warm day on the lake, and playing with my dogs are other favored pastimes, not to mention savoring a fresh hot pizza or a cool, heaping bowl of ice cream. I enjoy facilitating retreats and conducting supportive workshops on a wide variety of topics from using software that can make tasks more efficient, to finding strength and goodness in the face of adversity.

Escaping into new worlds, I find reading both exciting and relaxing. Storytelling, especially by the older generation, fascinates me. I also adore old architecture. Visiting antiquated buildings with original stonework, carved wood, and blurry glass, leaves me wide-eyed and fascinated.

My aspirations include a second master’s degree and much more writing: another book, editorials, and self-help articles, as well as offering editing, coaching and formatting services to other authors wishing to self-publish.

What inspires you to write?
Life events inspire me to write. Celebrating one of my greatest heroes inspired this novel. Knowing I can assist others and offer fresh, clear, and better perspectives is also a large part of why I write.

Tell us about your writing process.
Using an unconventional process, I start by spitting everything out. I then use an easel with a large chart to enter facts, ages, places, names, and where key elements appear throughout various chapters. Finally, I edit and massage until the words evolve from regurgitated narrative into a vivid, enticing story.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I believe I both spoke to the characters and listened to them. It was like watching a young child grow. I knew them in their youth, but together we learned about them as mature individuals, ready to star in the role for which they were meant.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write often; carry a notebook and never miss an opportunity to capture a creative thought while it’s fresh. Talk to other writers, bounce ideas off them. Ask friends how a difficult passage sounds. Don’t be shy about getting input or flat out asking for help when you need it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to self-publish my book as a brand new author and after reading about the differences between both platforms. I wouldn’t say it’s an easier road. It may be more achievable, because more is up to you (verses an agent). However, it takes an investment of almost as much time as the writing itself to learn about the self-publishing options, rules, and best practices.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the industry will continue to grow with many more people venturing out to finish that work they’ve always dreamed of writing. Most people I know have said they wanted to write a book. As the opportunities become more available, I see more of them following through. I’m not sure if that’s a great thing or not. Can’t wait to see!

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Spiritual and personal inspiration and growth

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lillian Corrigan Home Page Link
Link To Lillian Corrigan Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Darlene Torday

About Darlene Torday:
My first books “Bad Moon Rising” and “H2O” were written with the same co-authors.
I was born in Youngstown, OH and have been a lifelong resident of the state. I graduated from Boardman High School and have attended classes at both YSU and the county adult vocational school. I am currently working on a new book tentatively titled “Secrets.” I’ve had my stores published in magazine and the anthologies “Let Us Not Forget”, and “Recipes, Reflections and Recollections, Life in the Atchafalaya Basin”. I belong to a local writers group.

What inspires you to write?
I like to take an idea from life and expand it into a story that the reader is not sure if fact or fiction.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m more of a pants writer but this time the new book written with one of my previous co-author has been more planning. We did not outline and actually began writing the book out of order. It’s been a challenge that has been fun and a learning experience for both of us.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Sometimes the characters tell me what to do and if I don’t they bug me until I write it their way. Other times it’s my idea from beginning to end.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write about everything. It doesn’t matter if it’s only about something that happened recently, you saw it on television, or it’s as simple as watching a child playing. The more you write the better you will become. Also don’t forget reading is important. If you don’t read you will have a harder time writing.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Amazon has opened a whole new world for writers and you don’t need to pay to have your work published. This does not mean you should not edit and make your writing the best it can be.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I love that books are available in more than print, although print books are the ones I read most of the time.

What do you use?: Co-writer, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: historical fiction, women’s fiction, mysteries, romance, children stories, poetry

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Reneau Peurifoy

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About Reneau Peurifoy:
Reneau Peurifoy is a traditionally published author who is now an independent publisher. His first book, “Anxiety, Phobias & Panic,” published by Hachette, has sold over 200,000 copies and is in multiple languages. Peurifoy’s work has been embraced by many self-help groups and clinics addressing anxiety-related problems who have selected his books from among a host of others on the market as the basis for their programs. The Anxiety Disorders Association of America (ADAA), the nation’s primary organization for anxiety-related problems, has invited Peurifoy to speak at eleven national conferences.

Peurifoy has a wide range of experience in front of groups and has appeared extensively on dozens of television and radio programs. Peurifoy’s warmth and comfortable manner generate a strong rapport with audiences. Because he believes so strongly in the material he has developed over his years as a therapist, teacher, and workshop leader, his excitement over sharing it is genuinely contagious.

Peurifoy was in private practice for twenty years as a marriage and family therapist specializing in anxiety disorders. He retired from private practice in 2000 to teach at a local College in Sacramento, California. He has attended Fuller Theological Seminary and after retiring from teaching in 2015, he received a ministerial credential from the Church of God headquartered in Anderson, Indiana. He now is spending his time writing, speaking, and seeing people with anxiety-related problems as a pastoral counselor. He has also developed a YouTube channel that features videos on practical life skills.

What inspires you to write?
I enjoy teaching and helping others. There are few things more satisfying than seeing someone grasp something that was difficult or overcome a difficulty they had been struggling with. This is the goal of my writing: to provide quality material that others find useful.

Tell us about your writing process.
I usually start by making an outline of the topics I want to cover. I then sit at the computer and just write. Next, I print out what I’ve written and use scissors, tape and a pen to edit. I take my handiwork back to the computer and edit the file. I often throw out what I’ve written and start over. I also like to send first drafts to beta readers to get feedback. I go through this entire process two or three times before I’m ready to send my work to an editor.

What advice would you give other writers?
Develop a thick skin. Be willing to share your writing with lots of people and do not take their comments personally. If several are saying similar things, it means you need to rewrite. If it’s only one or two and you like what you’ve written, it’s probably fine as it is.

You cannot grow and improve in a bubble, you need to test your material in the real world. Be open to positive criticism. It’s also a good idea to interact with people who are positive and who have been successful at what you want to do.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self-published my first book. After selling 50,000 copies, Warner Books (now Hachette) picked it up. That opened the door for my next two books. I now would like more control over the process so I’m returning to self-publishing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
As in many other areas, technology is allowing individuals to take control of processes that were once only available to large companies. I think this opens up lots of opportunities and will result in more creativity.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Self-Help, Psychology, Christian,

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Reneau Peurifoy Home Page Link
Link To Reneau Peurifoy Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Geoff Small

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About Geoff Small:
Of all the cities I’ve ever visited in the UK or on the continent of Europe, it’s only when I walk the streets of Glasgow that I truly feel as if I’m on the set of a film noir movie; its looming sandstone tenements with stoops leading up to Spanish-tiled closes; the sharp-cornered grid plan of its city centre like a mini New York straddling cascading hills that could be in San Francisco, bisected from east to west by vanishing point alleyways. To me, this city and its unique atmosphere are like a moreish hard boiled sweet that I just can’t stop sucking. And that’s why, even though I come from the Midlands of England, I just had to set my novels here, desperately trying all the time to recreate and transmit the feeling I get from this amazing spectacle of a town to my readers. In the same way that I am infatuated with the city of Glasgow, I have now become addicted to a character I have created who walks the streets there. When I first began writing DCI Pat Curzon – AKA the Dirty Rouge – it was intended as a bit of fun, the outcome a novella called the Dirty Rouge that would serve as a one-off homage to Glasgow and the noir genre – or so I thought. But here I am, releasing Whisky Leaks, book 3 in The Dirty Rouge detective series, following on from A Long Walk In The Snow, a full-length novel. It’s a cliche, but I feel as if I haven’t chosen DCI Curzon so much as Curzon has chosen me. I think we’re probably attached forever now, with me destined to follow him around the evocative streets of Scotland’s largest town until the end of time.

What inspires you to write?
I must confess that, although I have read many many books in my time, the things that most inspire me to write are when I watch a good film or a documentary about artists, whether they be writers, painters, musicians etcetera. Another thing that really get’s my creative juices flowing is when I travel to new places, ideally walking the streets of a strange city, just me and my streams of consciousness like a flaneur. Although films, documentaries, travel and walking inspire me to create, it is only reading and the ideas that are found in books that can bring any substance to that inspiration.

Tell us about your writing process.
I think thinking is the biggest part of the writing process. Theoretically, somebody could write a first draft of a novel in the length of time it takes them to type one. So, for an office secretary it would probably take a couple of hours. But it could have taken a decade just sitting around and thinking about the things that actually go into her novel. So, first part of the process is invisible. It’ s the bit sat watching TV, reading papers, books, going on walks. Then, I take a pen and a few A4 pads and I just write and write and let everything just spew out in longhand. Once I’ve finished this part – the most enjoyable part in my opinion – then I type the whole thing up as is on the computer, before reading and re-reading it about a thousand times, editing and amending as I go.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t listen or talk to my characters so much as float above them, in my case following Pat Curzon around the Glasgow of my mind. He’s in my mind up to no good all the time, I’m just his biographer.

What advice would you give other writers?
I don’t believe I’m in a position to give advice to to other writers because I’ve so much to learn myself. But what I can say about my own experience is that the more I write the better I become and so that in itself is a reward for sticking at it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’m fortunate enough to live in an era where you know that you WILL have your work published, thanks to e-books, kindle. Publishing on kindle format wasn’t a choice, it was the only option really. I’m happy to say that Whisky Leaks will be available in paperback soon, with the other books in the Dirty Rouge series soon to follow.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think books will carry on being published in hard copy as they always have been. As somebody whose self-published through e-books, though, I worry that the current formats might become obsolete and that we’ll all be expected to republish through some new medium in future. I have no evidence that this will actually happen, but I’m just a worrier and we all know that things move really, really fast now don’t they.

What genres do you write?: Crime

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To geoff small Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.