Interview with Author – Daniel S. Fletcher

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About Daniel S. Fletcher:
Asia-based writer from Leeds, England; British novelist, journalist, professional copywriter and poet.

Moved to Spain at 22, and wrote first book in Ibiza, España, entitled “Jackboot Britain” – an alternate history novel & screenplay set in a Nazi-occupied United Kingdom.

Thereafter, left Spain in January 2012 and moved to Thailand, working as a freelance professional copywriter and journalist in Southeast Asia as well as a martial arts reporter for two years, before becoming a full-time author in 2014.

“Kings of the Jungle” followed “Jackboot Britain” in 2014 – further novels due for release include “The Acid Diaries”, “The Mescaline Diaries”, “Transcendence: Beyond the Glass Ceiling” and “The Last Lions of Asia”.

Fletch lives in Phuket & Ko Pha Ngan, Thailand – a move to Bali, Indonesia is imminent.

What inspires you to write?
The power of language; key truths of our human existence enunciated by the greats, and the emotive feeling such prose can inspire. We may be primates, but there is a collective need for solidarity and answers, observation and validation, as an incalculably tiny part of the cosmos that has become aware of itself. Language offers the means to meaning in our human lives.

Besides, I can’t do anything else.

Tell us about your writing process.
A bullet-point list for an outline, and away we go!

“Jackboot Britain” contains eight or so concurrent storylines, and so required a tad more planning and outlining. With any other book thus far (two published, four in progress) I just tend to have a “notes” page, with a vaguely defined plan, and then write the book. It feels natural and flows.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Aye, t’b’sure – we have many a fine conversation ‘cross the campfire!

I write my fictional characters with as much flow and momentum as I can, saving nitpicking for the editing process. In Jackboot Britain, the methodical approach was best served for the historical characters such as Reinhard Heydrich, Heinrich Himmler, Adolf Hitler et al. In these extreme cases, given the nature of their political lives, the carnage they unleashed and the incalculable suffering they caused, their every word has to be fine-tuned in order to best represent reality in the realm of fiction. Characters entirely of the author’s imagination, however – let it flow!

Don’t be caught out in public talking to your characters.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write!

Enjoy the ride.

Impatience! I have no advice for other authors, it would be entirely meaningless. Just write, enjoy your craft and if you do it well, the chances are your readership will correspond to the quality of your work. However long it takes, don’t flag or fail. Shine on, young jedi. ¡Namaste!

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The availability of information and the speed at which it can be distributed can only be a good thing – perhaps not for profit, but for content sharing and learning. The internet is Enemy to the fascistic, to the censor and to the institutional ruler. A golden age for information, after centuries of being stifled, choked and suppressed.

What genres do you write?: fiction; humanist libertarian fiction; science fiction & fantasy; alternate history

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Daniel S. Fletcher Home Page Link
Link To Daniel S. Fletcher Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Tom Canan

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About Tom Canan:
Tom Canan was born and grew up in the small town of Kimberly, Wisconsin. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire and the University of Minnesota Law School. He is a former small business owner and currently works as legal counsel for Olmsted County, Minnesota. He is married to Elizabeth and is the father of Katherine and Will Canan. Will was diagnosed with a brain tumor at the age of 6 in 2004. He bravely battled cancer for over 8 years before he left us much too soon in October of 2012 at the age of 14. Will was an amazing, kind, funny, earnest young man who loved dogs and baseball and inspired many people across the country and around the world with his grace under the most enormous pressure imaginable. I’m privileged to tell his story in “Where There’s Will, There’s A Way – Reflections on My Son Will and His Cancer Journey”.

What inspires you to write?
My son Will and his incredible battle with cancer is what inspired me to write. I want to share his story with as many people as I can in the hopes it will inspire others.

Tell us about your writing process.
I created outlines dating back to the time of Will’s diagnosis and reviewed the information posted on his Caring Bridge and Facebook pages for material.

What advice would you give other writers?
Find something important to write about that moves you deeply, choose your words carefully to try to convey your ideas as clearly as possible and in such a way to help readers visualize exactly what you are talking about, and don’t give up when people tell you it is impossible to write a book and get it published.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I worked with a local editor and got a print version of the book printed here in Rochester, MN; then worked on preparing an e-book version once the print copies were being sold.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
E-books are the future of the industry, though because they rely on batteries and lack the tactile feel some people appreciate in a print book, print books are never going to vanish completely.

What do you use?: Professional Editor

What genres do you write?: Biography, Inspirational, Personal Growth, Faith

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Tom Canan Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

Interview with Author – Jackie Parry

About Jackie Parry:
Originally from the UK, Jackie is now an adopted Australian. She grew up with horses in the UK until her world was shattered with a heart-breaking bereavement. Disillusioned with life she ran away to Australia and met and married Noel. They decided to buy a boat and set sail. So within her first year living in a foreign land, she was getting used to a foreign husband, and a foreign life on board!

Mariah II took Jackie & Noel around the world. Pyewacket II (purchased in San Francisco) took them across the Pacific Ocean for a second time on a more southerly route. Adventures include The Great Loop in the USA plus Canada’s Great Lakes and the French Canals.

As a commercial skipper Jackie has worked internationally, and has been a Marine Rescue skipper. She has also taught commercial maritime. She co-wrote a pilot book (in America) and several hundred magazine articles worldwide. Cruisers’ AA (accumulated acumen) was Jackie (and Noel’s) first self-published book.

Currently Jackie is exploring the French canals on a Dutch barge with her Australian husband.

What inspires you to write?
The voices in my head! No, really. I have that many ‘things’ going on in my mind, to get them down on paper (or screen) is actually very cathartic for me and a bit of a relief.
I love writing, so if ‘those-things’ in my head make sense – why not share them?

Tell us about your writing process.
I am very seat-of-my-pants. There is no organisation in my life or in my writing. Somehow it all comes together in the end. I do keep copious notes though – even if they are messy.

However, that is for non-fiction. I plan to tackle fiction next year and I am super organised so far. I think you have to be, already I am building my characters and getting to know them. Last night I sat in bed and my husband, Noel, said to me, ‘what are you writing?’ I replied, ‘I’ve just thought of a way to murder someone and get away with it’! I don’t think Noel slept well that night!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I am starting to! I am attempting fiction next year and already I know some of my characters very well, they are fun to chat to (well, the nice ones are!).

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep going. It is a hard, long progress. A marathon. But just keep putting one step in front of the other and keep going. Whether it is a few hundred words per week, or researching and reading, or blogging, do something/anything each day to bring you closer to your goal. Every little step matters and every little step takes you that bit closer to the final product.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I was about to sign a contract with a publisher for my first book, Cruisers’ AA. Then, they pulled out. They had just purchased three other companies and had no time for new projects. I was last in, so first out. While disappointing at the time, it actually did me a great favour. I had to figure it all out myself. Now I have complete control over my books and I have learned so much. Best of all I CAN do it!

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It is the same as that person who said, ‘It will be a paperless society.” If you write a good book there will be readers, so it is great that people like me can self publish. There are enough ‘readers’ in the world to justify ebooks, self-publishing and books shops.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Non-fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Jackie Parry Home Page Link
Link To Jackie Parry Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Joyce Scarbrough

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About Joyce Scarbrough:
JOYCE SCARBROUGH is a Southern woman weary of seeing herself and her peers portrayed in books and movies as either post-antebellum debutantes or barefoot hillbillies á la Daisy Duke, so all her heroines are smart, unpretentious women who refuse to be anyone but themselves. Joyce has three published novels as well as several short stories available as Kindle downloads. She writes both adult and YA fiction and is active in her regional chapter of SCBWI. Joyce has lived all her life in beautiful LA (lower Alabama), she’s the mother of three gifted children and a blind Pomeranian named Tilly, and she’s been married for 31 years to the love of her life—a superhero who disguises himself during the day as a high school math teacher and coach.

What inspires you to write?
I write stories that entertain me and hope others will enjoy them as well. I’ve been making up stories to entertain myself since I was four years old. Sometimes I couldn’t wait until bedtime so I could lie in the dark and envision the stories in my head. It wasn’t until many years later when I began plotting my first novel that I realized I’d been plotting books all my life. The only difference is that now I write them down. This is why I don’t understand it when writers say they get sick of their own book by the time it’s published and don’t want to read it again. I never get tired of reading my own books because I wrote them to entertain myself in the first place.

Tell us about your writing process.
I always start with the characters. After I have a clear picture of my protagonist and the other main characters in my head and also in my Blue Spiral Notebook, I ask myself the “what ifs?” What if this happened to them? What if somebody was trying to do this to them? What if they had to do this and couldn’t get out of it? Etcetera, etcetera. Then I write a narrative overview of all the major plot points, making sure I have a strong beginning, middle and ending. This ensures that I don’t get halfway through a book and stop because I don’t know how to end it.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Oh, yes. My characters often decide they don’t want to do what I had planned for them. Sometimes the bad guys steal my heart and become not-so-bad guys. Sometimes my heroine doesn’t end up with the guy I thought she’d pick. And sometimes someone just has to die no matter how hard I try to save them. When these things happen, I go back and adjust the overview to match the new plot developments.

What advice would you give other writers?
Read, read, read. Keep writing and never give up. Read some more. Write the stories that come from your heart and make you laugh and cry, and don’t worry about market trends or what’s hot right now. Buy more books and read some more. Find someone who loves the same kind of books as you (and that you know will be honest with you) and ask them to be your First Reader. Write every day, even if it’s only one sentence. Just make sure it’s a great sentence!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I first started out, I wanted the validation and credibility that my books had gone through the scrutiny of a submission process and been accepted. Now that I’ve published four books with small publishers and have a modest following of readers, and since I’ve worked as an editor myself, I’ve decided that I may self-publish my future books. I wouldn’t mind if one of them attracts the attention of an agent who wants to sell it to a big publisher, but I’ll keep publishing regardless.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Digital books are here to stay, but I don’t think real book lovers will ever give up printed books altogether. I love my Kindle, but I still want copies of my favorite books to go on my bookshelves. I’m happy that self-publishing is available for everyone, and I’m grateful that more and more well-known authors are bringing credibility to it, but I wish there were a way to filter out the books by people who don’t take writing seriously and think it’s just a way to make an easy buck. I’m happy there are sites like this one to help readers wade through the garbage and find good books worth their time and money.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: YA, women’s fiction, paranormal fiction.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Joyce Scarbrough Home Page Link
Link To Joyce Scarbrough Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Eric Kent Edstrom

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About Eric Kent Edstrom:
Hi! I’m the author of the YA science fiction series The Undermountain Saga and The Scion Chronicles.

My main influences:

Star Wars – In particular, The Empire Strikes Back. I know I’m not alone in my love for this great story. It’s influenced my writing tremendously.
The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan (and Brandon Sanderson) – I started reading this series when I was 19 or 20 years old, right when the first book came out in paperback. I love how the Two Rivers characters interact with each other. My favorite character is Rand (sorry, but I’m conventional that way)
Die Hard – Yes, the movie with Bruce Willis fighting terrorist thieves in an office building. I’ve watched it dozens of times. I even outlined the whole movie beat by beat to understand how it ticks. Let me just say that no scene is wasted. It is an utterly amazing screenplay.
Pride and Prejudice – I’m a hopeless romantic at heart. That said, I know the BBC miniseries better than the actual book.
Harry Potter – Why did I relate to the story of the boy under the stairs who is really a wizard? Maybe it was wish fulfillment. Maybe it’s because one can’t help but root for the orphan boy who finds a family amongst the only people who could possibly understand him. Hermione is obviously my favorite character, though.
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson. This series left an indelible impression on me, and taught me the concept of the anti-hero.
Aliens – The second movie in the series. The one directed by James Cameron.
The Shannara Books by Terry Brooks – I read the first three during high school. I recently discovered I was pronouncing Shannara wrong, which made me feel like a moron. I have not read anything past Wishsong . . . yet.
The Belgariad by David Eddings – I adored these books when I was a kid, devouring them whole like eating a chocolate chip cookie in one bite. I have not revisited them since, fearful that they wouldn’t live up to my memory of them.
The Lord of the Rings – I struggle through the books occasionally, but I love them. I love the movies but I was severely disappointed by how they depicted the battle between Eowyn and the Nazgul.
The Matrix – Truly a brilliant movie that never gets old for me. It causes me to question reality on a regular basis.

So what do all those influences influence me to write? Well, I took on a YA science fiction series called The Undermountain Saga. It’s full of adventure, epic struggles, a bit of romance, and exotic locations.

What inspires you to write?
Reading is what inspired me the most.

Tell us about your writing process.
I outline the first 50% of each novel, then start. I do my first drafts very fast by dictating them.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I chose self-publishing because I wanted to control every aspect of the process. I have never written a query letter or submitted a novel manuscript to any agents or editors.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’s amazing. The best time to be a writer ever!

What do you use?: Dictated and got transcribed, Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: science fiction/fantasy for all ages, but targeted at young adults.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Eric Kent Edstrom Home Page Link
Link To Eric Kent Edstrom Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Michelle Weidenbenner

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About Michelle Weidenbenner:
AWARD-WINNING and AMAZON BESTSELLING AUTHOR.

GOLD Medal WINNER in the 2014 READERS’ FAVORITE International Awards.

Bronze Medal Winner in Dan Poytner’s Global eBook Awards.

Winner of the Kindle Book Promotion Awards

Michelle is a fulltime employee of God’s kingdom, writing and encouraging writers every day. She’s often a sucker for emotional stories, her sensitive side fueling the passion for her character’s plights, often giving her the ability to show readers the “other” side of the story.

She grew up in the burbs of Detroit with five brothers. No sisters. Each time her mom brought the boy bundle home from the hospital Michelle cried, certain her mom liked boys better than girls. But when her brothers pitched in with the cooking, cleaning, and babysitting–without drama, Michelle discovered having brothers wasn’t so bad. They even taught her how to take direct criticism without flinching, which might come in handy with book reviews.

Michelle is living her dream–writing every day and thanking God for the stories He puts in her path. When Michelle isn’t writing she’s winning ugly on the tennis court. She’s known as “Queen of the Rim Shots.” No joke. It’s ugly.

CACHE a PREDATOR is currently hidden in geocaching sites throughout the US. If you’d like to see where there might be a novel hidden in your area, please log in to geocaching.com and search for trackables at IN SCRIBE–that’s Michelle.

What inspires you to write?
Every day battles and stories of ordinary people who persevere, who sacrifice and love despite adversity.

Tell us about your writing process.
I outline but keep it loose enough so I don’t smash my creativity. Every hero needs a goal and a reason to want to reach that goal. Obstacles get in the way of that goal and cause conflict. Sometimes other people get in the way. Sometimes it’s internal. Most of the time there’s an internal and external battle within the character. I love it when my hero learns something along the way too. I like to know what my character’s fears and dreams are before I start. I know their backstory, but I don’t always write it down. My friend, Janelle, taught me how to find pictures of my characters so I can remember what they look like. Lol. That’s what Pinterest boards are good for.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Not as much as I’d like to. I’m hoping that that improves a little. I can be shy.

What advice would you give other writers?
Butt. In. Chair. Give yourself permission to write garbage, but don’t ever publish your first draft. Be willing to split yourself open to criticism. If we quit learning… we’re done.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I waited a long time to find an agent. I found one. Then I had to wait to find a publisher. I got tired of waiting because I have so many stories to tell, so in July, 2013 I published my first book. I’ve published two since then and will publish the fourth next month. I love having control over when I publish my books. I’m a huge entrepreneur so the business aspect of marketing my books hasn’t felt daunting. It’s been a lot of creative fun. I only wish there was two or three of me. (My husband does too. Ha!)

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The paradigm is shifting so quickly. I think we’ll see more product-planting in self-published books. But eventually I think we’ll see more interactive books. Even for adults–with pictures of our characters and the settings in the stories.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: I’m a RANDOM GIRL who writes in random genres.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Michelle Weidenbenner Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Terri Reed

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About Terri Reed:
Award winning multi-published author Terri Reed discovered the wonderful world of fiction at an early age and declared she would one day write a book. Now she is fulfilling that dream writing full-time. Her romance and romantic suspense novels have appeared on Publisher’s Weekly top 25, Nielsen’s Bookscan top 100 and featured in USA Today, Christian Fiction Magazine and Romantic Times Magazine. Her books have finaled in Romance Writers of America’s RITA contest, National Reader’s Choice Award contest and two times in American Christian Fiction Writers The Carol Award contest. She resides in the Pacific Northwest with her college-sweetheart husband, two wonderful children, and an array of critters. When not writing, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, gardening and playing tennis.

What inspires you to write?
Life inspires me. I love to people watch. As a kid I would make up stories about the people around me. I also find news and real life events are great fodder for my imagination. Playing What-if is always a good prompt.

Tell us about your writing process.
I plot heavily before I write and I do it long hand. The same with character development. I use several different forms from various writing guru’s and fill them in long hand. There’s something about the act of writing by hand that stimulates my brain. Then I’m a bit of a pantser/plotter during the actually writing. I consider my very detailed synopsis as a road map. I have a beginning, events that build upon one another through out the middle as we journey toward the final destination. As I write I allow myself and my characters to take side trips or alternate routes, as long as I can still find my way to the end point. Letting my creative mind take over has taken some of my books in interesting and surprising places that I hadn’t planned on at the beginning. It keeps it fun for me and hopefully for the reader.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I do talk to my characters, asking what they are doing, why they are doing such and such and what are they feeling. They talk back to me, then I give them voice on the page. Its a very symbiotic relationship.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you want to make this a career, then you must be persistent and persevere despite the obstacles that will undoubtedly come your way. Very wise and wonderful author, Muriel Jensen, once told me that crisis of confidence is the enemy of every writer and attacks without warning. She said you must be strong enough to push through the crisis of confidence. I am constantly battling my own crisis of confidence.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I write for Harlequin and now for Tule Publishing Group. I knew I wanted to write for Harlequin when I started down the road of writing with the intent to publish. My creative writing college professor told me I should be writing for Harlequin. Of course when I was twenty, I had no idea how to make that happen and certainly didn’t think I had what it took to write. But that thought never left me, so when I decided to pursue a writing career, I targeted Harlequin. It took my ten years to have my first full length book published by Harlequin Love Inspired. Now eleven years later I’m still writing for them and enjoy doing so.This past year I was asked if to write for Tule Publishing Group. I had a wonderful time delving into the world of Montana Born books set in the fictional town of Marietta. Of course, writing about cowboy is always a joy.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think more hybrid authors will emerge and that readers will find every type of book they could possibly want to read.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Inspirational Romantic Suspense, sweet contemporary romances

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Terri Reed Home Page Link
Link To Terri Reed Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Carac Allison

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About Carac Allison:
Carac started playing with PET and Tandy computers when he was a young teen. He learned to write on a Commodore 64 but he was never much of a programmer. It was the connections the computers made possible that interested him: the connections between people alone in the dark listening to the strange music of modems, the pirated games they shared and the bulletin boards they chatted on before the internet.

At York University Carac studied English Literature. He read modernist and contemporary novelists but his main interest was always the detective genre. He wrote about the works of Raymond Chandler, H.P. Lovecraft and William Gibson.

Carac’s role within Academia is focused on IT Security. As a member of Western’s Information Group on Security, the Risk Assessment team and an investigator in student hacking cases, he has seen the good, the bad and the ugly of the digital frontier.

Carac now lives in London Canada with his wife Beth and their children.

What inspires you to write?
The urge to cast light on dark ideas.

Tell us about your writing process.
My writing process involves lots of preliminary notes, constantly revised outlines and many, many drafts.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I listen to my characters. They tell me what they’re thinking and where they want to go.

What advice would you give other writers?
I really wouldn’t offer any advice. It’s taken me so long to figure out how to write a great novel that no sane writer would want to emulate me.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My publisher closed their crime imprint right before they paid me my advance.
My agent helped me get the novel out faster and at a lower price for readers.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The future is the dime store past. Readers want to buy more books and they want to carry their books around with them.
Reasonable prices and eReaders are what make this possible.
Traditional publishers need to get with the f***ing program. And established authors need to drop their prices.
Is it that simple? . . . Yeah I really think it is.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Thriller, crime, hardboiled, noir, pulp.

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Carac Allison Home Page Link
Link To Carac Allison Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads

Interview with Author – Dr. Laura Maciuika

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About Dr. Laura Maciuika:
Dr. Laura Maciuika is a first generation Lithuanian-American, which led her to discover moving between worlds at an early age. A psychologist by training, Dr. Maciuika has also studied and integrated into her work eastern wisdom traditions, energy psychology, neuroscience and transformational human development. She prefers simple solutions that help people quickly, and wrote her book Conscious Calm: Keys to Freedom from Stress and Worry to help people learn about the inner workings of stress and worry, and how to unhook from those patterns for good. Dr. Maciuika works as a psychologist and consultant in northern California, where she transplanted in the early 2000’s from the East coast.

What inspires you to write?
I had been hearing “you should write a book!” for a while, but had not taken that very seriously. There’s so much out there already, I wasn’t sure at first that I wanted to add to the din. But at one point I came to a musical metaphor – there are only so many musical notes, and yet people are still creating their own music that speaks to some people very directly. I decided that if I brought my own way of understanding the inner workings of the mind and body to serve people finding lasting stress relief in our overly busy world, that would at least speak to some people who could benefit from it. So I committed to getting Conscious Calm written and out there, and added a free Try This Action Steps guide to support people in really doing the simple steps outlined in the book, not just leaving it as another book of “shelf help.”

Tell us about your writing process.
For this book, I was definitely an outliner, and a distiller and reviser. I knew the information I was trying to distill was very broad, and yet I wanted a readable book in simple language, without a lot of jargon or technical explanations. And yet I wanted those people who were interested in more of the background to have references. So I kept paring down what I was explaining and teaching into the simplest form I could muster, and added footnotes for people who want to follow the citations. There were giant white sheets of paper across my home office walls, stacks of revised outlines and different ways to order the topics – that part took almost longer than the writing, given the breadth of the topic I was trying to simplify.

What advice would you give other writers?
Be faithful to your writing time. Set a time to write, every day if you can, and just show up, just do it. Doesn’t matter if what you wrote that day is something you throw out in a day or two – if you show up for the writing, the Muse will show up too. There’s some kind of cosmic law, I’m sure.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Since I’m an impatient type when it comes to getting work out there, and since I’ve been learning more about marketing in this process too, I decided to found an independent self-publishing company. That way, I’m able to control how long the book is out there, where and how it’s marketed, and not have it go out of print in a year or two if a publisher’s version of sales targets is not reached in time. For new authors – I’d say get clear on what you’re looking for. If part of your motivation is to be published by an established publishing house, spend time learning how to craft a killer book proposal, and make sure you spend at least as much time building a platform as you do writing. If you decide to self-publish, start the marketing piece and the promotional platform well before you put the book out there. Or get the help of a book shepherd or another professional who can support you in getting your good work out into the world.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that independent publishing is going to become more the norm than the exception, and that multi-media platforms will also become more popular and widespread. Writing a book is no longer just about a physical book, and as much as I may have mixed feelings about that, I think if we embrace that fact, there are so many ways to reach more people with our work.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Psychology, Self Help

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Dr. Laura Maciuika Home Page Link
Link To Dr. Laura Maciuika Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Michael de Ridder

About Michael de Ridder:
I live in Australia. I’m actually undertaking an IT driven PhD in medical data visualisation, but I enjoy reading and writing on the side.

What inspires you to write?
I get inspired to write by a number of things. Animals are a big inspiration, as are things I see and hear in day-to-day life.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’ve got quite a simple writing process. When I first conceive an idea, I let it float around in my head a bit. Once the idea seems to have enough meat, I write out a brief bullet-point outline. From there, I just go straight into the deep end, developing characters and nuance as I go.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I definitely talk to them. I also find things that represent them, and sometimes take on their persona.

What advice would you give other writers?
Find what’s natural. Don’t try to force yourself to write with the ‘correct’ style. Some people plan a lot, others write sequentially, others do a snippet here or there. Think about your personality and transform it into your writing.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
It’s not hard to do anymore with all the web services around facilitating e-publishing. My thought process was simply that if I’ve spent all this time writing a story, I want people to be able to read it.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the future is bright. There’s more democratisation as people have avenues to get into the market without big name publishers standing in the way telling them they need to be famous or jump through hoops. Of course, they professional publishing process serves a purpose, but we will find a balance.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Fiction, noir, adventure, sci-fi

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To Michael de Ridder Page On Amazon

Interview with Author – Jaime Lorie Goza

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About Jaime Lorie Goza:
I am a wife and mother, first and a full time writer, second. I have always loved to tell stories and when I started having children, I found that I was pretty good at making up stories to tell them as I put them in bed. I started college, a little bit later than most. I waited for all of my children to get in school, before I began to further my education. I am now very proud to say that I hold a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. I found that I really loved to research and actually liked to write the essays that there were so many of.
I began to write, because I was sitting for many hours each day, in the middle of nowhere, as I was working in the oil field industry and watched over crews. There was so much down time, that I found myself playing on my computer and one day I thought to myself that I wanted to write a short story and see how that went. I turned the short story into three full sized books and have not stopped writing since then. I have stopped doing that job and now work as a writer and have an office at my house.

What inspires you to write?
Reading other books, watching movies and even listening to music can inspire me to write.

Tell us about your writing process.
I often begin with an outline, but my most recent writing endeavors have been more of a flying by the seat of my pants creations. I am loving writing screenplays and have found that using Final Draft 9 makes it easier than ever to get one from idea to finished product, quickly.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I have written as though I am the main character. In those stories I listen to what my inner voice tells me. My latest stories are written in the narrative voice. I run dialogues through my head and then type them out. I run them through the Ginger program to see how they sound when spoken out loud, before I decide if they stay as is or have to be changed.

What advice would you give other writers?
Just do it, if you have a story that haunts you, write it. There is no need to wait.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I thought about traditional publishers and researched them. I found that there were many stories about how inundated the majority of publishing houses were with new author’s books. I decided to self-publish with Createspace and am happy with my decision.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that it is full of change and I am hopeful that the changes will make it easier for new authors to get their books read, that is the goal that we all have, after all.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Romance, Fantasy, Drama, Horror

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Jaime Lorie Goza Home Page Link
Link To Jaime Lorie Goza Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Awesome Gang

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Interview with Author – Ska St. Julian

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About Ska St. Julian:
I was an early reader in a household of avid readers, so writing came with the territory. I was always making up stories, creating strange places and people with wonderful talents and powers. My non-author life pales in comparison, and a lot of that revolves around reading and writing as well. I was an absent-minded professor, and now I’m an absent-minded freelancer. Basic bookworm existence.

What inspires you to write?
Everything. Anything. I’m one of these people who says, “Oh God, that should be a story!” on a regular basis. Some area of my brain is writing at all times. What inspired me specifically to write The Basket was the insomnia in my family. It was a way to make sense of sleep.

Tell us about your writing process.
The Basket of Seeds was an oral history before it was written. I added to the story each day, and it just grew in different directions. Friends would call and ask what was doing in the forest today, or in the dream screen today, and I’d tell them. There’s a whole other Basket of Seeds that isn’t in the book. In 2012 I sent an e-mail from Mommi Sparklie telling my friends to watch for lost baby floateens during Hurricane Sandy. It’s a seat-of-the-pants story at heart, but I ended up making a calendar-year outline to make sense of the whole thing. The characters more or less created themselves, and I plotted a graph of who turns up in each chapter to give the story an easy pace.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Both. Seriously, it’s a dialogue.

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep writing. Keep polishing and editing. Don’t worry what others think–get your work to where you’re proud of it and it represents you. Then take a break from it and see it through fresh eyes in a week or two.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I spoke to someone who had a kids’ book out a few years ago, and she said that the publisher would put me together with an illustrator. Now, I drew the floateens, my own little extraterrestrials, so there was no way I was allowing some stranger assigned to me to mess with my concept. I had to have control, find my own artist, and work closely with that artist, including assisting in drawing the floateens. Enter Eugenia Cameron, and we entered the world of self-publishing together.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Just like Andy Warhol said, everybody will have fifteen minutes of fame. I’m all for it!

What do you use?: Dictated and got transcribed

What genres do you write?: fantasy

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Ska St. Julian Home Page Link
Link To Ska St. Julian Page On Amazon

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