Interview with Author – Kitty Kendall

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About Kitty Kendall:
Kitty Kendall is a bucket list achieving, junk jewelry collecting, hopeless romantic who loves great wine and a good adrenaline rush from time to time. She also collect classy shoes and expensive perfume. But her greatest thrill in life is writing romance and the steamier the better. Bring It On!

She writes under two pen names and has won numerous awards, including Romantic Book of The Year 2014, and several of her books are Amazon bestsellers.

What inspires you to write?
The story. Once I get an idea for a story in my head it won’t leave me alone. I dream about it. I think about it constantly. It’s like I’m possessed and the only way to rid it from my brain is to write about it. One story I wrote was in my brain for 22 years, so when I finally sat down to write it, it took just 3 months.

With The Rise of Memphis Monthly Chronicles, I wanted to read a book where the woman was nervous about sex, ie not a sexual diva. I couldn’t find what I wanted and I always found erotica so serious. So I created a wonderful character – Jane Nichols who becomes her own naughty twin, Memphis, in order to find sexual gratification that’d been eluding her for years. I also wanted to show that sex could be fun and that it wasn’t always perfect, consequently the stories are as hilarious as they are steamy – exactly how I like to write.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have a huge cork board where I pin up a rough scene map of where the story is going using index cards. I color code them for each characters point of view. I also have a scrap book for every story I’ve written. Each one is full of character ideas, story ideas, pictures I’ve found and drawings I’ve done, treasure maps, related articles and anything that I think will relate to the story. I also make a mock front and back cover for the scrap book, complete with fake reviews from New York Times and Oprah. Haha. I love looking back over the scrap books and seeing where some of my ideas sprung from. Maybe they’ll be worth money one day.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Oh absolutely. My poor husband thinks I’m nuts because I talk to him about my characters as if they are real people. When I’m writing dialogue I read it out aloud in my characters voice which can get a little weird when they have an accent. I’m always dreaming about them too. In fact I often solve their problems while I’m sleeping.

What advice would you give other writers?
Turn off the television. If you need to watch television, watch a movie and analyze it until you work out what works and what doesn’t. Keep an eye out for the pivotal points and really study the dialogue as this will help you improve your voice. By the way, I do most of my movie watching in my home gym, that way I get to exercise and study at the same time.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My first six books are all traditionally published and whilst I have done very well with substantial awards and Amazon bestseller rankings, my earnings have been very poor. I’m very grateful to the two publishers who gave me a shot, however, I’ve now taken a leap of faith to travel the self published road. My Rise Of Memphis series is my first voyage into self publishing and so far, I love the control I have over everything from the cover, editing, blurb, marketing strategies and pricing. It has cost me a lot of money to get to this point. My only hope is my readers love my stories as much as I do.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Writing a book is about transporting a reader into another world. Fortunately for authors, people will always be looking for that kind of escape. Ebooks allow readers to have this escape at a very low cost. So I believe eBooks will continue to dominate the future of our publishing industry. It’s getting harder and harder to have a book produced in a print format and unfortunately only high ranking authors get that privilege. This means that readers are looking to eBook to find new, exciting, and unexplored authors.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: I write Romantic Suspense, Crime and Erotic Romance.

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Kitty Kendall Home Page Link
Link To Kitty Kendall Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Mirrie Kelly

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About Mirrie Kelly:
I did everything in the correct order and was a success in the eyes of the world, until I decided that I was not sure I was looking at the world properly. The result of my realization was that I threw everything which I knew up in the air and started again.

Unlike many people who pack it all in for a dream we did not even have the dream, we were running from what we knew and had no idea where we were going. The adventure changed us as a family for ever.

I started to write once I realized that what we had done was truly amazing. Once I realized how strong we were and how much anyone out there can do.

Even now, when I am not sure if the money will get me to the end of the month, I know that the guidance given by the moral compass (which I now listen to) is worth more than the steady income I received from my corporate career.

I guess I kicked the system and not only survived but also thrived!

What inspires you to write?
Everything around me inspires me to write. I look at my children and know that I cannot say and they cannot absorb everything I want to tell them. I watch the news every morning and shout at the television, I have so much to say that I do not think that I can write it all in a life time.

Tell us about your writing process.
I write alone and no one sees or reads it until it is finished. I do not discuss what I have written. My writing is honest and soul searching but I love to work with the kids in the same room as me as they keep me smiling and stop me from ever wallowing.

What advice would you give other writers?
Just write it.

Our lives are a series of interactions and writing is an amazing way to interact with more people and to share something special. However, it does not actually alway require them to read what you have written to be affected by it. Sometimes a person can get strength to face a challenge knowing that others have faced theirs. Sometimes just telling someone that you are writing a book is enough to inspire them.

If you want to write – write, and the same applies to painting or anything else you have an urge to try. Never let the fear of judgment hold you back.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Kindle was and is my choice. It is easy and free. Writing should not be limited to those who have money or connections.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I hope that it will get easier. I love real books but I live in France and for me to read books in English the easiest way was a e reader – so I got converted. E books really are a gift which everyone should have access to both to read and publish.

What genres do you write?: Self Help, motivational, inspirational

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Mirrie Kelly Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Ann Lethbridge

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About Ann Lethbridge:
An army brat born in England, Ann lived all over the UK in her youth. She grew up loving history, but majored in business, with history on the side. Now living in Canada, she has a husband and two lovely daughters and a Maltese Terrier called Teaser, who likes to sit on a chair beside the computer while she creates her award winning Regency historical Romances.

During her successful career as an administrator, the call of the past and the stories in her imagination brought her to a fork in the road. After her first book was published in 2006, she decided to write full time and hasn’t looked back. She has given talks on the various aspects of publishing as well as workshops on the craft of writing. She blogs regularly about her research on her Regency Ramble Blog.

Over the years several of her books have won awards including an honorable mention by Foreword Magazine. She is particularly proud of her 2009 win of the Daphne DuMaurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense for The Rake’s Inherited Courtesan. Recently She finaled in the Booksellers Best and the Golden Quill.

She loves the Georgian era, and within that, the period known as the long Regency. She also adores happy endings. You will find her print books in bookstores in the month of issue, as well as on line where you will also find her e-books.

What inspires you to write?
I always have lots of characters who pop up in my head saying “pick me, pick me”, but it is usually a scene, something with lots of conflict, that gets me started on a particular story. The scene will either fit one of those characters, or it will be someone completely new who fills the role of hero or heroine.

Although I write historicals, sometimes it is an incident in the newspapers that inspires me. After all, while fashions change, as do modes of transport and forms of communication, human nature seems to stay very much the same. It might be a fairy tale such as Cinderella that inspires me, or it might be a documentary on television. Sometimes there are too many all at once, so I write up a little blurb and file it away, hoping I can make sense of my notes when I look at them later.

I can’t not write. I might miss a day here or there, but I really need to get those voices out of my head and onto the page.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am a pantser. I like the story to grow organically. I took a course on plotting and plotted out an amazing story set in the future. I knew the beginning and the ending and the twists of the plot. I knew my characters inside out.

I never wrote the book.

My muse said, it is done and I am bored so let’s start something new, please. Really.

I decided then and there never to plot again. However I have taken several workshops on plotting and I use what I have learned to test my story as I go along. I usually stop at around twenty-thousand words and make sure I know what my characters want and why they want it, and figure out their biggest fear and then go back and tweak the earlier chapters. This makes sure that the story makes sense and is consistent. In the past I threw out a great many scenes that didn’t work, but this new method helps make sure I am on track allowing me to write a bit faster.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Scenes tend to play out in my head like movies, so I am in some ways a voyeur, listening in on conversations while also knowing what is going on in their heads. Once I understand my characters, I know how they should be reacting to what another character is saying or doing. I may occasionally chat with a character if they are stubborn and giving me a hard time.

What advice would you give other writers?
I usually advise writing lots, reading lots and going to writing workshops to learn the craft of fiction writing. If the first book doesn’t take, then after polishing the book as much as possible, write another.

I have found that some writers never get past the first book, spending time revising and editing the same story, sometimes for years, because they are in love with it. My personal opinion is that it is better to write another book while waiting for the first one to click. Rinse and repeat.

I had six stories finished before I sold the seventh. All but the very first of those six have now been published.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I started writing, self-publishing was not the option it is today. I sent out all of my books, Regency-set historical romances, except the first, to both agents and editors and managed to attract the notice of my agent with one of them.

He sold that book to a small house, the second to a medium size house, and then we sold one of the earlier books to Harlequin who have now published 26 of my stories. I love working with a publisher and particularly the team at Harlequin.

This year I self-published a story that does not fit within their imprints, a vampire story set in the Regency, which is turning into a series, the second one will be out in 2016. I have enjoyed the experience and learned a great deal.
I now have the rights back to some of my earlier books and will be self-publishing them at some time in the future.

I certainly hope to continue publishing with Harlequin. At the moment I have five books left to complete in a seven book contract.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Humans love stories, writers love creating stories, and there will always be a way for the two to meet, be it over a camp fire, in a library, or electronically. This I know.

As for the future, more people will read on their tablets and smart phones. Some people will always read physical books and down the road there will be new ways of accessing books. Publishers will continue to buy books and authors will continue to sell to publishers as well as self-publish their stories.

Yay for stories! No matter the delivery system.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Regency-set Historical Romance, Historical Paranormal Romance, Western Historical Romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Ann Lethbridge Home Page Link
Link To Ann Lethbridge Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – John J. Patterson

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About John J. Patterson:
Over a 38-year business career, Mr Patterson held senior executive and consulting positions in a number of industries. Most roles were leadership positions in the Operations and Technology areas. He was EVP/COO for two companies; partner with a major global consulting firm; Co-founder and president of a regional consulting company.Early in his career, he was a production scheduler in a glass bottle factory, a stereo salesman and later a computer programmer and project manager. He started a record store and a brass furniture store.

Mr. Patterson resides on Spring Branch Farm in Butler, Maryland with Katharine, his wife of almost 35 years. They have two wonderful daughters, Grace and Hannah. He and Katharine travel frequently usually on birding adventures.

What inspires you to write?
My muse made me do it.

Ever since I retired from the working world, the Muse kept insisting that I had something to say that could help others in their working life.

It had to do with my running list of rules to survive in the workplace. I developed the list over a 35+ year career that progressed from glass bottle factory production scheduler, stereo salesman, programmer, Anderson Consulting (now Accenture) partner, consulting firm founder, and two COO positions.

If you ask anyone who worked with me they will tell you that I would often refer to the “rules” when problems arose – “Have I told you about Rule #7?” My colleagues and co-workers started to say, “Have you just got a list of these rules?” I did make a running list of the rules and you can still find versions of them hanging over some of my co-workers’ desks today.

The rules all revolved around Rule #1 – Crazy People Make You Crazy. It is a recognition that there will always be some folks you deal with at work who will not be logical or grounded or willing to run with the plan. Their condition may be permanent or temporary. Management and leadership training assumes your supervisors, co-workers, and staff will indeed be logical.

The muse would not let me sleep until I helped people survive the hard world of crazy people at work with my experience and perspective.

Tell us about your writing process.
I was lucky in this case. Writing a nonfiction, self-help book I already had my list of 10 rules to start. Actually, were 13 or 14 but we cut it down to 10. I had a lot of talking points and stories which I wanted to get across after 35 years in the business world; so I wrote a short title for each story in point on a Post-it note. Then I put them on the wall and organized them by the 10 rules. I then created a separate Word file for each chapter/rule. I then wrote the details of the talking points in each chapter. From there there was a lot of judgment, re-prioritizing, and adjustment to get the words to sing together. I did try some software but the learning curve is too great and the flexibility to small for me to work with.

What advice would you give other writers?
Be cathartic in your writing, get it all out and down on the page. You may adjust and pull things out later but there a lot of good pieces of my book that just came from getting it all out.
Have an alpha reader and a beta reader who are unmerciful in their critique and suggestions for your book.
The writing of the book and getting it in book form is the easy part. You need to drive the marketing side yourself. Even with a traditional publisher you have to do a lot yourself.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I reviewed the market between traditional publishing and self-publishing. I found the traditional publishers expect a writer to have his own marketing platform, his own development messages, and his own marketing strategies. Producing the book physically is pretty straight-forward these days. There are lots of folks to help in that process. I found that it was also a long waiting time if you did get picked up by a big publisher, plus the song and dance for an agent, to even get considered by most publishers. All that for two dollars per book wasn’t worth it to me.

I think I won’t get many chances to write and publish books. If my book published by a traditional house doesn’t sell, they have to let it go. But I write because I have something I think people should hear. So the likely scenario is after dancing for a year for an agent and waiting for the publisher to publish the book for a year or two, most books do not sell and go to the discount rack if they are lucky.

I believe there are roughly 7 billion people in the world (at last count) and there is going to be a group of them who will eventually benefit from my writing. So I might as well start finding them myself.

The decision to self-publish was the only option from my perspective.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think book publishing is very bright in the future. The key is how open self-publishing makes the market. People before, couldn’t gather their thoughts and produce ideas of value for publication, and now they can. And there are people out their learning, and thinking, and feeling, and reading the books that are produced.

The future is bright because there have never been so many people getting their thoughts out there. It is like music, there are not a lot of people getting rich due to the low prices for recorded music. But there have never been so many people playing and enjoying music. Which is the point, as I see it.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Nonfiction, Business & Money, Self-help, Self-improvement

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
John J. Patterson Home Page Link
Link To John J. Patterson Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Lisa Orban

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About Lisa Orban:
I was born in Galesburg, IL in 1969. I was moved by my parents (without even asking!) to Quincy as a small child. Bouncing from parent to parent, and house to house until at 16 I was given a broader tour of the state courtesy of foster care. At 18, I voluntarily left for Phoenix with a high school friend where I lived for three years.

After returning to Quincy, I went to college and earned an Associates of Arts in Psychology, with a minor in Art. Over the years I have held many jobs, but never quite found the right one. I have written poetry and short stories on a variety of subjects from raising children to finance for online publication. Finally in 2013, after much urging from my friends for years, I sat down one day and started writing about my life.

I am the mother of five children, all grown and gone, except my youngest. Which I am sure is trying to drive me mad (as all teenagers do) and I have plans to write another book in the future about their childhood, much to their anticipated dismay.

I currently live in my hometown, in the house I love, and at the center of the chaos I enjoy so much. I’m often surrounded by my children, my loves, friends and the strays (both two legged and four) I take in. I continue to seek out new adventures, misadventures and new mistakes to fill the pages of my next book, laughing as I go.

What inspires you to write?
I have always been a storyteller, with a flair for making people laugh at the comedy of errors that is my life. After many years of encouragement by friends and family, I sat down and wrote my first book.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start off thinking about my favorite stories, the one’s that I have shared the most and have gotten the best reaction. Those then remind me of other stories, and if I think they’re good enough or move the story line along in the way I am looking for, I add those as well. I may add and delete a story a dozen times or more before I ultimately decide to keep or reject it.

What advice would you give other writers?
As a brand new Indie author, so new the shiny hasn’t even worn off yet, I’m not sure what advice I can give other than write if it makes you happy.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After looking over the publishing world and seeing how difficult it was to gain the attention of either a publishing house or publisher, and how few take unsolicited manuscripts, I decided to self-publish with Amazon. It is not the easy route, as you try to negotiate through not only writing, but publishing and marketing in a field that few have outside of the publishing world have any expertise in. But, if you have the stamina, and a little insanity to make the whole process more palatable, it can be worth all the effort to take your words and turn it into a reality.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Honestly, I’m too busy trying to figure out this current book publishing world to speculate about a future one.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: memoir, autobiography, Young Adult, New Adult

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Lisa Orban Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Jacie Floyd

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About Jacie Floyd:
From the time I read my first Nancy Drew mystery, I’ve been an avid reader and writer in a variety of genres. Although raised in the Midwest, I’ve always believed I was an island girl in a past life.
After many years as a wife and mother with a nine-to-five job, the desire to create my own stories and to live somewhere without snow became primary goals. While polishing my craft as an unpublished author, I was honored to be named a six-time Golden Heart Finalist and two-time Golden Heart winner by the Romance Writers of America.
I finally abandoned my day job and snow shovel, moved to Florida, and self-published the kind of stories I like to read and write. I currently enjoy the view from my Southwest Florida lanai and would like nothing more than to continue to put my heart into my stories enjoy the sunshine. I love to travel, cook, and connect with readers through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

What inspires you to write?
I never know what will spark an idea and the curiosity about “What if?” I love the human psyche and heart. What makes people do what they do? Why do they react to certain stimulus differently than someone else would? What makes them brave in some situations and timid in others? Was it their childhood, their environment, or personal experiences that impacted them the most? When I’m writing a story, I get to dig deep and decide all of those things for my characters. That’s a powerful motivator.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m a semi-outliner and a quasi-pantster. I decide on the characters first, then write a brief outline of what I think the plot will be and fill in some general scenes for each chapter. Then I put it away and don’t look at it again unless I get stuck. Which does sometimes happen, especially if I’ve veered off of the plan. I know at the start who and how I want the hero and heroine to be, their basic strengths and weaknesses. I don’t do character interviews unless I get stuck and need to dig deeper. I don’t use any software programs, or whiteboards, or sticky notes. I just have a couple of document files that I refer to from time to time for each book. Thinks like research information, family details, characteristics and descriptions, names of secondary characters, text that I’ve written and deleted. I get antxy if I think of trying to organize it any other way.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to them as much as I let them talk to one another. They have pretty lively discussions in my head. If I leave them alone, they seem to know what they want to say and how they want to say it.

What advice would you give other writers?
No matter how much you like to write, publication is a different ball of wax. It’s hard and it’s a lot of work and very time-consuming. But you can do it if that is what you really want. Never. Give. Up. The sense of self-satisfaction and accomplishment is immense when I look at my list of books on Amazon and say to myself, “I did that. I made that happen.”

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I always wanted to be traditionally published, but that was the environment I grew up. It was the only option when I began writing. It took me a long time to realize the dream could come true for me in a different way. My daughter encouraged me to self-publish my books. I’m not sure I would have done it without her encouragement. I couldn’t have done it without her technical expertise, and it has ended up being one of the best decisions of my life.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Everyone is always saying that the end of publishing physical books is near, or that the ebook trend is tapering off, but I don’t think either one of those is true. There will always be a need for real books, but many readers like the convenience of the ebook platform. It’s all good.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Contemporary Romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Jacie Floyd Home Page Link
Link To Jacie Floyd Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Betta Ferrendelli

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About Betta Ferrendelli:
Betta Ferrendelli is the award-winning author of the Samantha Church Mystery Series featuring reporter Samantha Church. Her most recent novel is “An Invincible Summer.” Many of Church’s adventures come from Ferrendelli’s own experience since 1989 as a prize-winning journalist for newspapers in Denver, Seattle and Albuquerque.

What inspires you to write?
I am inspired to write when I see people engrossed in the book they are reading. Years ago, I was working out one evening while I watched a woman reading a book while she exercised on an elliptical machine. The more she had become engrossed in the book the slower she went on the elliptical until she stopped completely. She stayed there on the elliptical not moving for at least 10 minutes until she start to exercise again. I don’t know what book she was reading, but that must have been some chapter! It was good enough to make her stop exercising until she finished reading. I often think about that when I am writing and would love to think that my writing could do the same thing for a reader.

Tell us about your writing process.
When I start a novel, I always know the beginning and the end, which includes the first sentence/paragraph of the first chapter as well as the last sentence/paragraph for the last chapter. I have an idea what comes in the middle, but much of that unfolds as I write. As I am about to start a project, I still enjoy going to the library to start the initial process. I do several drafts for the scenes I know will be in the book as well flesh out each of the characters on what I expect them to do during the book. I don’t write this using my computer, rather it is hand written in a notebook, as I still enjoy using pen and paper. If it is for my mystery series, I will do a review of what I’ve already written as well as flesh out continuing storylines and what I want to happen in the new book.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I listen to them and I watch what they’re doing.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write, write and write, even if you don’t like what you’re putting down on paper. It is so much easier to edit a story when you have something down on paper.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I am very happy with my decision to self-publish. I believe I have been able to reach far more readers with ebooks and print-on-demand books than had I gone the conventional publishing route.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The book industry is like the newspaper industry, there will always be books, just like there will always be print newspapers.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Mystery, mystery series, thriller, suspense, legal, contemporary, family drama, family life

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Betta Ferrendelli Home Page Link
Link To Betta Ferrendelli Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Nicole Luckourt

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About Nicole Luckourt:
Nicole Luckourt professed in her fifth grade autobiography that she would be a writer when she grew up. Though life has taken her on many adventures and detours since that time, she has never abandoned her desire for creating stories and breathing life into the characters and plots in her head. With the publication of Expert Witness, her childhood dream has become a reality. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, two children, and several beloved pets. Her background in the field of psychology inspires her writing and she is thrilled to be able to combine her two passions.

What inspires you to write?
I find inspiration to write in everyday experiences. Watching the news, observing people, or even walking the dog can lead to an idea. Then, the idea grows in my head for a while until I jot it down before I forget it (or don’t write it down and decide it’s better forgotten). For me to seriously entertain a plot for a future novel, the characters and setting have to be something I know I will enjoy writing about. Let’s face it, a book is a significant commitment in terms of time and effort. I won’t decide to write a fiction novel unless I feel passionately about the content. Otherwise, there is no way I would ever finish the book. Even when it’s a story that I’m enthralled with, I’d be lying if I didn’t say that about three-quarters of the way through, I’m looking forward to finishing the book (usually because I have another plot I’m anxious to delve into).

Tell us about your writing process.
I try to dedicate three hours a day to writing during the weekdays. I also have a day job and younger kids, so it doesn’t always happen. And that’s okay. I’ve found the most important part of the process is to write something as often as possible. If I don’t do that, I lose where I’m at in the story, I grow distant from my characters, and I forget where I was going with the scene. I do write from a general outline for each chapter, but I don’t fully develop the scenes in the outline and I let the characters and their actions drive how each scene evolves. If I’m away too long, I have to reread everything I’ve written. I go back over my outline, my character sketches and my research until I feel I can pick up where I left off. Having had to do this before serves as a motivator that prevents me from doing it again.

In addition to a dedicated number of hours per week, I also complete character sketches prior to beginning the book and research any topics that I need to brush up on. My background is in psychology, so developing the characters comes more naturally. For Expert Witness, I consulted with several law enforcement officers to make sure these aspects of the storyline were authentic. It bothers me to read a book that was not well-researched and contains inaccurate information. I never want to be the author who writes that way. With that being said, my editor had some strong comments regarding one scene in Expert Witness (don’t want to include any spoilers), and I’ve learned that there is a balance between accuracy and drama.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to them, but they are in my head. And I move the story in the direction that naturally evolves from knowing them. At times, it does feel as though I’m a spectator. I’ve heard authors say “of course you know where it’s going, you’re writing it.” But I can say that’s not true for me. I have an outline; however, there are times when I’m writing and the scene is playing out in my imagination as I furiously type what I’m seeing. There have been times when I’ve laughed aloud at something that happens and had no prior intentions of putting the humorous interlude in the scene. I think this uncertainty stems from having a strong grasp of your characters and sometimes realizing that what’d you planned might play out another way when you’re visualizing their interactions.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write consistently, write about something that you are interested in, and don’t listen to your inner critic until it’s editing time. The hardest part is finishing the book, so any barriers (within your control) that might prevent you from doing this need to be eliminated in the beginning.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
As I wrote Expert Witness, I read articles, interviews, and books on both self-publishing and obtaining an agent to try to land a traditional publishing deal. In addition, I’ve read fiction written by indie authors for years and have watched their writing careers develop over time. I decided early on that I wanted to give self-publishing a try and didn’t send my manuscript to any agents. I liked the fact that the self-published author retains control over the cover, the content of the book and can market the book how he or she sees fit. Then, I heard about Amazon’s Kindle Scout, in which the author is responsible for editing and the cover, but if the book is selected, Kindle Press publishes and promotes it. I decided I’d enter my novel into the program. My campaign went well for a new author with a small social media following, but the books chosen by Scout the day mine was up for consideration were from much more established authors. After this, I went with plan A and self-published my novel. Scout was a good experience though, and participating in it taught me more about marketing than I ever wanted to know (but should know). The marketing aspect of self-publishing was something I’d underestimated. Even with a well-written and professionally edited book, it’s a challenge to obtain a presence in online selling sites. It’s tricky because in order to get readers to see your book on shopping websites, you have to obtain a high enough sales ranking. However, it’s hard to make enough sales to obtain this sales ranking without any visibility on the site. The most consistent advice given to me is to keep writing. Having more than one book published is an important aspect of marketing and, I’ve been told, one of the most successful aspects. That makes sense to me… and I really just want to write anyway (smile).

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the future of book publishing will be very different than it is now. With sales online increasing and sales in brick-and-mortar bookstores decreasing, more readers will be selecting books based on recommendations through search algorithms or social communications. Consistently, the grow of eBooks will contribute to the continued decline in print books. It is also conceivable that more self-published authors will create publishing companies as well the number of books published by indie authors will also grow.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: romance, young adult, new adult

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Nicole Luckourt Home Page Link
Link To Nicole Luckourt Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Lisa Beth Darling

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About Lisa Beth Darling:
It was in the 4th grade when Lisa Beth Darling discovered she was a naturally gifted writer. For her very first creative writing assignment, the teacher asked the class to pen a story about a baby bird’s first flight and read them to the class. Putting pencil to paper, Lisa was instantly whisked away by a force she couldn’t explain. When they were finished, all of the children read their happy stories to the class. Not Lisa. She got up and told of how the baby bird flew too high, hit a plane, crashed to the ground and died. She told of how the mama bird and daddy bird cried of how even God was upset sending the rains pouring from the sky. The class was speechless when she finished all they could do was stare at her. The teacher kept her after class told her the story was very good but it was different from the others. She asked Lisa if she’d ever heard of Icarus and did she base her story on him. Lisa had yet to encounter Greek Mythology or hear a whisper of Icarus. As Lisa left the classroom the teacher again told her how good the story was but suggested she might want to write something happier next time. When Lisa asked her teacher: “Why?” The teacher had no answer. Luckily for us, Lisa never took that teachers’ advice.

Today she brings us complex multi-layered stories rich with the trials and tribulations that make up the world in which we live. Not one to be pigeonholed into any single genre, Lisa’s stories revolve around the intricacies of couples from range the intimacy of lovers, to mothers and sons, and brothers and sisters.

Lisa Beth Darling is 49 years-old, lives in her hometown of New London, CT with her husband of nearly 30 years, Roy. She is the author of more than fifteen novels along with several short stories and non-fiction books.

What inspires you to write?
The Muse. I’m one of those annoying writers who happens to be very spiritual (not religious) and believes that all of her stories come to her from the Muse. Once the Muse presents the story to me and gives me the basic outline of what we’re going to write then I draw from all aspects of life including my own personal life and world events.

Tell us about your writing process.
My favorite place to write is in my home office where everything I need/want is right at my fingertips. I’m surrounded by all of my favorite books, a few letters from Stephen King, family photographs, and a plethora of “Americana” in the forms of KISS dolls, Star Trek dolls, an original Star Trek phaser, Twinkie the Kid (given to me by my brother), and a wide assortment of other such items. I burn incense and candles when I write. There’s generally a glass of my favorite potent drink and a cup of coffee next to me you’ll probably also find a lovely piece of hand blown glass nearby. You can hear Classic Rock; Boston, Bad Company, The Who, The Stones, Van Morrison, The Doors and so on blasting from my Itunes as my fingers are flying across the keyboard and I’m singing away.

Solitude is a must, that’s why I had my husband install French doors on my office where there was once just a huge open archway. I close my door, draw the curtains so no one can see me, and get to it. I always write on a PC, laptops are nice for something but I find them very difficult to write on, the keyboard is far too small. I use special ergonomic keyboards at home and at work.

I write every day from 2:15pm to about 4:30pm, which is when my husband comes home from work. Once he arrives home, it’s Us Time and all writing is put away for the night. On the weekends, anything goes and you can often find me at my desk still in my PJs at 4 in the afternoon.

I never plot anything out anymore, I found it got in the way more than anything. I always have an idea of where a story is going but not exactly of how The Muse and I will get there. That’s the fun part, I’m as often surprised by how something unravels just as much as my readers are.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters? No. However, the Muse and I have very lengthy conversations about writing and every single aspect of my life, his nose is always in my business. He’s always offering advice on everything from where to go next in a story to what I should buy at the grocery store.

What advice would you give other writers?
I wish I had some magickal advice on that one, but in the end, I guess I’d say; just don’t give up and don’t quit your day job. Chances are you will not make a million dollars ‘overnight’ with your book so if that’s your goal you may be in the wrong business. If what you want is to tell a good story and have your voice be heard then keep plugging along, eventually you’ll find your audience. If you’re going to submit to Internet based publishers–or any publisher really–always always always do your homework. Research every company and agent before you hit the submit button because, sad as it is to say, there are many scam artists out there.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I struggled for decades to have one of my books published in the traditional manner and found it to be a loathsome process that was both disheartening and humiliating. Then again, keep in mind the fact that I’ve been fired from every retail job I ever had because I just can’t sell anything. It makes me feel ookie. No offense to you nice salespeople out there, all I’m saying is that it wasn’t for me. I can’t even begin to tell you how many copies of “Writer’s Market” I went through or how many years I subscribed to “Writer’s Digest” hoping to find that one place that would give me just a tiny break. I never got past the standard Rejection Letter. In fact, I still have that stack, whenever I get really down and feel I can’t do something, I pull it out, look at it, remember how mad those people made me, and push onward. So to every publisher and agent out there whoever rejected me; Thank You, to this day you serve as a great inspiration. To those with small magazines and local newspapers who did publish my articles, prose, poetry all those years; Thank You! You made me feel that going onward was worth the effort.

I almost gave up on writing even though I know in my soul it is my calling in this life but luckily for me I’m a very strong-willed (bullheaded, stubborn) woman. I quit submitting, but I never stopped writing

One day, I got this newfangled thing called a computer and it led me to this really weird thing called the internet. Keep in mind, AOL was the biggest service provider during this time that should tell you how new all of this really was. Wait, let me help; there were NO Kindles! No one ever heard of an e-reader or an e-book. Anyway, on what was known as the Information Super Highway, I came across other writers who were like me. They were totally sickened by the entire submissions process and had given up on submitting their works to publishing houses but they still wrote and they still wanted their works to find their audience.

I did too.

I learned AOL Press. I made a website. I put my stories on it. I received the feedback I craved but was withheld from me for so long. I moved my website to GeoCities (go ahead laugh), I learned HTML…all on my own, no one, not one single person helped me decipher that foreign language. Eventually, I moved to my very own URL. I kept putting my stories up for free. I learned PhotoShop the same way I learned HTML. I made banners and eventually learned how to make book covers, t-shirts, mugs, mouse pads…all that happy stuff.

Then this thing called ‘self-publishing’ came along. At first, it was poo-pooed just like ‘vanity publishing’, in fact, that’s what people called it. The major difference was the author didn’t have to put forth a great big wad of cash nor get stuck with a bunch of books as print books could be ordered on demand or in small batches.

Even though e-books were still a year or two off from becoming an actual thing I jumped on this bandwagon. Through the entire process, I learned more things than I ever thought possible especially not without shelling out a great deal of money and sitting in class. Those skills turned out to be rather valuable in the employment marketplace. More than that, I reached and grew an audience and that allowed me to become content.

I no longer seek out that big publishing contract (don’t get me wrong, if it miraculously appeared in front of me I’d take it, but it isn’t a goal anymore) and I don’t feel as though I’ve been cheated or taken a less respectable route with my books. In fact, small as I still am, I feel quite accomplished, which is far better than feeling humiliated any day.

I look back on it all now and realize that I’m a Trailer Blazer.

I was Indie when Indie wasn’t cool.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Hopefully we’ll see more Indies out here doing it for themselves and, in turn, have major publishing houses do a bit of a turn around. It’s very difficult to break into a major publishing house or even to get a good agent, too difficult if you want my honest opinion. It’s an extremely discouraging process. The more authors do it for themselves the more money major publishing houses lose out and the more seriously they’re apt to take us in the end.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: I’m a multi-genre author covering everything; romance, erotica, paranormal/mythological, mystery, thriller, horror, drama, family saga, and even non-fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lisa Beth Darling Home Page Link
Link To Lisa Beth Darling Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Kristi Burchfiel

Kristi-Burchfiel
About Kristi Burchfiel:
Kristi Burchfiel never thought that the difficult times she found herself stuck in would result in writing Bible studies and devotionals. As a young pastor’s wife in rural Oklahoma, Kristi found herself digging deep into the Bible looking for answers to the questions that overwhelmed her life: How do I prioritize my life? What things should I focus on? What do I do when things don’t work out my way? How do I avoid having regrets later on?

Now, 14 years, two kids, and three churches later, Kristi strives to help others find the answers to their day-to-day situations and struggles by reading and applying God’s Word. She works daily to put God’s truths into practice and invites others to share in the peace of God through the truths found in God’s word with the devotionals posted on her blog and her 14 published books.

Kristi grew up in Valley Center, Kansas and received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee, Oklahoma. She has been married to her husband D Burchfiel for 18 years, and they have 2 children, Rebekah and Andrew. They currently make their home in Wichita, Kansas where D is a pastor in a local church.

What inspires you to write?
In a word, obedience inspired me to write. I really thought all the study and research I was doing was just for my own benefit. However, I really felt impressed that if I was learning and getting answers to my questions, then maybe others had the same questions, too. I started writing out of a desire to see others learn and apply the same truths that I was learning and applying. It sort of grew from there and I’ve just continued to seek to be obedient to share what God has taught me.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am a planner, so I have to plan out my Bible Study books. I spend time doing research and study. I make lots of notes and charts and graphs and cross-references before I even start thinking about writing a sentence that a reader would read. I like to make sure I know exactly what I believe God is trying to say through me before I sit down to actually write the words that will eventually show up in the book. I am slow. For my Bible study books, it typically takes me years to complete them.

On the other hand, my devotional books are much more spontaneous. I sit down and I write a devotional every morning. It’s something that I do for me and for that day, that is the truth that I feel that God has for me to learn and apply today. I write those very quickly and they seem to flow onto the page with ease.

It’s fun to have two very different approaches as it keeps things fresh and new each time I sit down to write.

What advice would you give other writers?
For me, the biggest thing is to know why I write. I have very specific and clear reasons why I sit down and put pen to paper, or fingers to keyboard. Knowing this has made it much easier to keep going when I get stuck, get writers block, or get discouraged. I can always go back to my reasons for why I do what I do. I am committed to seeing people not just know what the Bible says, but know how to apply it to their daily lives. I am passionate about this and that passion drives me to get out of bed early, work through weekends, and all the other sacrifices that need to be made in order to keep doing this. If you can’t easily identify why you are writing, you aren’t destined to do it for very long. Soon something else will pop up to distract you and tear your attention away from the work that is writing.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
For me, each book is different and I consider all my options for each one. I believe that knowing the book’s intended audience, how I plan to sell the book, and other such considerations go a long way in determining how I choose to publish my books. For some, I used a subsidy publisher. For others I’ve self-published. Some of my books are only available as an e-book. I have 1 book that is only available in print. I think it’s important to drill down and understand exactly who your audience is, where and why they buy books, and what is appealing to them in order to make a decision on how I publish books.

As an example, for the one book that I have that is only available as a paperback. When I got ready to publish it, I realized that I was doing a lot of speaking engagements. E-books are tough to sell on a table at the back of the room when I go somewhere to speak. My audiences are frequently older, so I wanted a paperback with slightly larger than normal print type. I wanted to be able to make those decisions and have book in hand quickly, so I made a decision to only publish a paperback and to go though a self-publishing site. I don’t sell very many of that book online, but it’s sells quite well when I go and speak.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it will continue to be a mixed bag. Ebooks vs. Paperback will continue to be a hot-button issue, but I don’t think either one will go away completely. There will always be a need/desire for paperback books. I think as writers, we will continue to have to get to know our books and our audiences so that we can make much more targeted decisions on the best way to reach our readers with our books. Self-publishing will continue to grow, and it is my hope that we, as a community of writers, will continue to improve on the quality of the books that are self-published. As the quality improves, so will the overall acceptance of self-published works among readers, distributors, and others that feed off the publishing industry.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Non-fiction christian devotionals/bible study

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Kristi Burchfiel Home Page Link
Link To Kristi Burchfiel Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Geoffrey M Gluckman

About Geoffrey M Gluckman:
Geoffrey M. Gluckman is the author of the award-winning thriller, Deadly Exchange (2007). The Secret Keepers is the sequel to Deadly Exchange. In 2013, he released Murder of Sex, a steamy romance suspense. For 2011 and 2012, he acted as a second level judge in the Maryland Writer’s Association Novel Contest, critiquing entries for fiction selection. He has been a featured author for Foothill College Author Series, Kathy Patrick’s Girlfriends Weekend, and presented at numerous book clubs, as well as radio and online interviews. In the past, he wrote full-length features for various print publications in the U.S., Canada, and Australia, such as Iron Horse Magazine and Law Enforcement Technology.

What inspires you to write?
Probably the greatest inspiration is telling a wonderful story that intrigues, tantalizes, and enchants readers. Time with nature offers much inspiration as well.

Tell us about your writing process.
Usually, a character begins telling me his/her story and I let it unfold from there–sometimes I am told the ending, sometimes not. I do chart an outline as the story progresses because it is a critical reference and important for the element of pacing in thrillers and mysteries. I hand write first drafts. I do lots of character sketches, some get in, some don’t.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
As mentioned above, the character begins telling me his/her story, so I am definitely listening. In fact, I let the character guide the story.

What advice would you give other writers?
I think reading a lot (I mean tons) is critical, and not only from the genre you prefer. Let curiosity be your guide.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
With Deadly Exchange (2007), I had been working with a big New York publisher for 18 months when they decided they did not want it, I had to scramble to find something else because some of the technology in the story would become obsolete. For Murder of Sex (2013), a steamy romance suspense, I wasn’t sure of how to market it, so I put it out myself, sort of an experiment. The story is really fantastic (my bias). Finally, the latest novel, The Secret Keepers, the sequel to Deadly Exchange, I released myself because the industry has changed so much, especially with marketing, which I am not that adept at, but I try. And I had a base of readers/fans built up, somewhat. I love meeting, talking with readers.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
That’s a tough one. I do know that reading is critical for people of all ages. Story and character are essential for human existence.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Spy, thrillers, mystery, suspense, romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Geoffrey M Gluckman Home Page Link
Link To Geoffrey M Gluckman Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – ravi ranjan goswami

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About ravi ranjan goswami:
Author is a science graduate,working with a law enforcement agency.He is from Jhansi and lives in Kochi,India.

What inspires you to write?
I get inspiration from the society.

Tell us about your writing process.
I write in creative spells.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
No,but i should do it some times.

What advice would you give other writers?
If enjoy writing you write.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I got encouraged by self publishing options.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
More and more competitive.Very good for the readers but a bit confusing too.

What genres do you write?: poetry and fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To ravi ranjan goswami Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.