Interview with Author – Bella Street

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About Bella Street:
Living so close to Nashville has provoked Bella to take up fiddle lessons. Until her tunes no longer sound like amorous alley cats, she writes weird romance (which includes Gothic romance, science fiction romance, apocalypse, time travel, paranormal, fantasy romance, New Adult–and possibly sasquatch).

What inspires you to write?
The voices in my head–but they settle down if I impart them to my computer :)

Tell us about your writing process.
I walk through basic character goals, their motivations, and what brings conflict. Beyond that, along with a character dossier, I write by the seat of my pants.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes. We banter. We argue. We break up. We make up. It’s very emotional.

What advice would you give other writers?
Never give up, and write more.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self-published back when it was the ‘death of one’s writing career.’ Now it’s cool. Does that make me a hipster? (No, skinny jeans are not for me).

I LOVE being able to write whatever the heck I want without yielding to house rules, and love it even more when a reader connects with my work.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It’s never been a better time to write. Publishing will become more niche, and there’s an audience for every voice.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: gothic romance, time travel romance, paranormal romance, science fiction romance.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Bella Street Home Page Link
Link To Bella Street Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – FJ Harmon

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About FJ Harmon:
I was born in Detroit, Michigan struggled working my way through college and kept a jump ahead of the draft board by joining a Naval Reserve Officer Corps program. The net result was that in the summer of 1968 I graduated from college, got married and went onto active duty. My Naval Intelligence career began in Washington, D.C., where we remained for the next thirty-six years. After my initial tour of active duty, I stayed in the reserves and pursued duel careers as a Naval Reserve Intelligence officer, and national intelligence technical analyst working for Naval Intelligence, the National Security Agency, Central Intelligence Agency and Defense Intelligence Agency. Until 2007 my writing was confined to technical documents, position papers and contract proposals, not exactly the stuff of fiction. My urge to write fiction was kept on the “back burner” until my retirement in 2007, when looking for something to do with my time I was inspired by a proposal by the state of North Carolina to build a deep-sea port between a nuclear power plant and a nuclear arms depot. It struck me that this scenario presented an ideal target for terrorist action. The next six years were devoted to research and honing my fiction writing skills and my first book was born. I currently write for a local magazine in St. James, North Carolina, Cat-Tales, and I am working on my next books.

What inspires you to write?
“What if …” ideas grab a hold of me and I can’t stop thinking about them until I have written about them. My first book “Revenge For What Is Sacred” it was the idea that the state of North Carolina wanted top build a deep water container ship port between a nuclear power plant and an arms supply depot. It struck me that it would make an ideal terrorist target. For my second book, it was the idea an identity thief stealing the identity of a hunted criminal. This was not the story of my second book, but it led me down the path.

Tell us about your writing process.
I write a lot of backstory for my characters so I can get into their motivation, and of the events that lead up to the point where my story begins. I find it is much easier to detail the plot line if you understand the motivation behind the story.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes I do. I sketch the scene and then let the characters tell the story by letting my myself write whatever comes to mind. That is when my characters take control of the scene, frequently surprising me.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write, revise, critique. Keep on writing until you can hear your characters. Then listen to them for your story.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I had little to no platform, so I felt trying to convince an agent to convince a publisher was a waste of time. No matter who published my book I knew I was the one saddled with the task of marketing. So I went the self-publish route with CreateSpace. For me it was a quick, efficient, and pleasant exercise.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think book publishing in the future will be done on-line to a mostly digital format.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Fiction, Suspense, Thriller, Mystery

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To FJ Harmon Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

Interview with Author – Teena Stewart

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About Teena Stewart:
Teena Stewart is an author, artist, and ministry leader. In addition to The Treasure Seeker, recent book credits include Mothers & Daughters: Mending a Strained Relationship and Brave New Century.

What inspires you to write?
Sometimes the people I meet. Sometimes situations.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start with a seed of an idea. Then I write a proposal paragraph. Then I outline. Then I flesh out the outline into paragraphs. Then I build onto those to make chapters.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
No. But as I learn more about my characters they help determine what will happen.

What advice would you give other writers?
It’s a lot like farming. If you work your field every day, planting, watering and weeding you will eventually get a crop.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Most of my books are traditionally published. The one that isn’t is because my agent had a conflict of interest with someone who had a similar idea so she couldn’t represent me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
More and more people will self publish and more people will switch to electronic books. Writers need to write a quality product to be able to compete will the mass of published books out there.

What do you use?: Co-writer, Professional Editor

What genres do you write?: christian romance, christian historical romance, christian non-fiction, christian living

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Teena Stewart Home Page Link
Link To Teena Stewart Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Wendy Knuth

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About Wendy Knuth:
After playing video games with her children, Wendy Knuth was inspired to write a book about zombies for kids. She hopes that humans of every age will enjoy reading this book as much as she loved writing it. Wendy is happily married to an old, bald guy, and they live in Arizona, where they continue to raise their two zoners.

What inspires you to write?
What inspires me? All sorts of things. Things children say, applying twists to ideas I get from television or online news, and pulling ideas from people’s personalities. I really enjoy a subtle nuance as much as outright sarcasm. I also enjoy the challenge of knowing that there must be a way to make the story or characters or conversations better, and then make it happen.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start out with either an idea or a funny title, and then work from there. I use Word and start placing information at various points on the page, farther down or up depending on where I think it would be good in the story. The information is very rough and often will be moved, deleted or rewritten as I see fit. There are points in the process where I take a break for a day or two to stew on things, whereas I won’t look at my work so I can come back with a fresh take on the material. This process is probably a lot like my desk – it appears very cluttered but I know where everything is.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
When I hear my characters speaking, I am listening to my children’s voices in my head and how they would say something. I do speak to my computer screen whether or not family members are present. As I write this, it sounds slightly disturbing so I’m glad to hear I’m not alone! Lately I find myself talking about zombies often. I really hate distractions such as music, the phone ringing or people speaking to me, but oddly enough I have no problem with the television droning on in the background.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you enjoy writing then write. Get lots of feedback! Then rewrite. Sometimes you think you are making a point that is actually being missed. Other times a reader might be confused about something. For children’s books, get feedback from kids and adults as they both can see things very differently.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I first looked into writing, I was discouraged by the lengthy and tedious process of looking for an agent who then submits your idea to a publisher. I have read numerous books to my children as they were growing up and many were not so hot, even though they were from big publishers. I was also very concerned about relinquishing any control of the artwork. I had a vision of these zombies and I wanted it to be carried out. I decided to go with createspace mostly due to the cheapest price of the book for author purchases, as well as Amazon’s large presence in the market.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it is an interesting time with the cheap availability of ebooks. I imagine there will be a push and pull going on as more indie authors emerge and as ebooks take up a larger and larger share of the market. What will happen to print? Hard to say but I speculate that more and more copies will be sold directly online. While it is hard for me to imagine reading to children, cuddling up in bed with an electronic device, I believe that the coming generations might soon consider it the norm.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Children’s Fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Wendy Knuth Home Page Link
Link To Wendy Knuth Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – J.A. Cipriano

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About J.A. Cipriano:
J. A. Cipriano is an indie YA author who revels in the spunky, supernatural world of teenagers, werewolves, vampires, and magic.

What inspires you to write?
Everything. I’ve written since I was a little kid. I’m shallow, I don’t want to change the world or anything. I just want to write my stories.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am a seat of my pants writer. I just start writing. I’m as excited as anyone to see what’s going to happen. Sometimes I do sit down going “I’m going to write a chapter where x happens” but I don’t usually do more than that.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
No.

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep writing. Everything you write will suck a little less than the thing you wrote before it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After 150 query rejections with only two agents asking for pages I gave up on that whole traditional thing. If I didn’t self publish, my story would still be in a box under my desk and I’d still be begging agents to just look at the first page damn it.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think I don’t know what to think.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: paranormal, urban fantasy, action and adventure

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
J.A. Cipriano Home Page Link
Link To J.A. Cipriano Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

Interview with Author – David J. VanBergen Jr.

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About David J. VanBergen Jr.:
David J. VanBergen Jr. is a life-long science fiction and fantasy book fan. After reading those books for 30+ years, he jumped into being an author with both feet. His first fantasy book published on his 40th Birthday in 2013 and there are many more books on the horizon.

David has been inspired by some of the largest traditional science fiction and fantasy authors as well as some of the up and coming indie authors. His books are fast paced and easy reading for sci-fi & fantasy readers of all ages.

What inspires you to write?
I am an avid fantasy genre reader and I have been inspired by the success of other indie writers. Now that I have 2 books completed, I am inspired the the characters I have created who are begging for their story to continue. I have to keep them alive!

Tell us about your writing process.
The first step is to create detailed character profiles so I know each of the characters inside and out. I then create a basic plan for the book then start writing. The characters come alive while I write and essentially help me write the story. Many times I have written something only to realize that my character would never have done that so I have to go back and tell how it really happened.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I am a silent observer who watches what my characters do and record it for the world to see.

What advice would you give other writers?
Never stop learning. There are so many resources available that can help you become a better writer and all you have to do is read a book in many cases.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self published because it was the only option I could afford.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it will be split between indie writers who publish many books at a lower price and traditional writers & publishers who publish far less often and charge higher prices. There is plenty of room for both.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: fantasy

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
David J. VanBergen Jr. Home Page Link
Link To David J. VanBergen Jr. Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

Interview with Author – Ellen Gable

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About Ellen Gable:
Ellen Gable is the author of five books: “Stealing Jenny,” a contemporary thriller about a pregnant woman who is kidnapped; “In Name Only” (Gold Medal, Religious Fiction,2010 IPPY Awards), “Come My Beloved” (non-fiction) and “Emily’s Hope,” and “A Subtle Grace,” newly released. The Kindle editions of her novels have been in the top 20 of the Religious Drama category since February, 2012. When not writing novels, posting to her blog or writing for a variety of websites, Ellen enjoys watching classic movies, reading fiction and playing board games with her family.

What inspires you to write?
What inspires me to write is a desire to give readers a good story with believable characters. First, I want to entertain readers but, most importantly, I want them to finish the story feeling like they’ve learned something not only about themselves, but also about others.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start out with an idea. If it’s going to be historical, I do the research first. Otherwise, I write a detailed outline, create characters, then write the first draft. This draft will be rewritten several times before it’s given to my developmental editor (who offers suggestions on plot, sentence structure, characters, setting). When I implement those changes, I then send it to my copy-editor who offers suggestions for word usage and grammar. My team of beta readers then offers their suggestions and last step is for the book to be read carefully by my team of three to five proofreaders.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I set up situations between characters and often act out the scenes. I don’t usually talk to my characters, per se, but I do have them talk to other characters. I also put myself in different characters’ shoes/minds to figure out what they might say, do or react in any given circumstance.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write a good, compelling story with well-drawn, believable characters. Pay attention to the little details. Write, polish, edit and keep polishing. Use professional editors. A good,well-edited story can often start out like a rough diamond that, when well-polished, the brightness of the story will eventually shine through.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to self-publish 11 years ago before self-publishing was “easy.” I hired editors, cover designers and proofreaders to help me to produce a quality product. It wasn’t easy, but I learned a lot. Nowadays, self-publishing is so easy that many authors completely bypass important steps in the process (like good editors, proofreaders, beta readers and cover designers). I now own a small publishing company that publishes other authors’ books as well as my own.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that e-books will eventually sell more books than print books, but I also think that print books are here to stay.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Christian Fiction, Suspense, Romance, Historical Romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Ellen Gable Home Page Link
Link To Ellen Gable Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Theresa Rizzo

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About Theresa Rizzo:
Theresa Rizzo is Bestselling, award-winning author who writes emotional stories that explore the complexity of relationships and families through real-life trials. 

Born and raised in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, she currently lives outside of Boulder, Colorado with her husband of thirty years. She’s raised four wonderful children who are now scattered across the country.

Awards: Theresa’s debut book, He Belongs to Me, won the 2014 National Indie Excellence Award for romance and the 2014 Readers Crown Award for Mainstream Women’s Fiction, a silver medal in the 2014 Readers Favorite for general romance, and was a finalist in the General Fiction Category of The 2013 USA Best Book Awards.

What inspires you to write?
Writing’s fun! Where else can I create the perfect man? Or punish a stupid man–without going to jail? Or enjoy the perfect kiss–you know the one that’s long and lingering and so sexy it makes your stomach flip-flop and your toes curl–you know that kiss.
Through interesting, relatable characters, I love to tell a story that pulls my readers in and makes them think, this could happen to me and if it did . . . what would I do?

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m somewhat of a control freak, so I outline the major plot points, but leave room for “winging it”. I also do a TON of research and that often reveals awesome plot twists. I do do character sketches, however, my characters reveal themselves through the course of multiple revisions, so they’re really not fully formed for at least 4-6 revisions.

I blow through the first draft as quickly as I can getting down plot and dialogue and then flesh out and refine the characters and story in subsequent revisions after lots of input from my invaluable critique partners and beta readers.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
This is going to seem kind of creepy, but I don’t talk to my characters or them to me, I just try to jump into the skin of the POV (Point of View) character and see what she sees and feel what she feels and then get it all down, scene by scene.

What advice would you give other writers?
LEARN. Go to writers conferences. I know they’re a real investment in your craft/career, but I think they’re well worth it. Join a writers group. Learn from excellent writers in genres other than your own. Do not be in a rush. Be a perfectionist. Beat yourself up until you get the best damn story you can create. Don’t settle for mediocrity. Don’t–PLEASE DON’T–rush to self publish.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’ve been learning the craft of writing, going to 2-5 writer’s conferences EVERY year for almost 20 years. I’m a member of 3 writers groups. I’ve been a contest and submission whore. I’ve developed a tough skin and learned so much I thought my head would burst many times.
I had 2 different great NY agents who really believed in my books, yet couldn’t sell them because they straddle genres–romance and women’s fiction, yet both firmly believed there was an audience for my stories–and they were right.
So in 2013 I self published my first book, He Belongs to Me after having extensively researched and used a great editor, professional cover designer and print and digital formatters.
I love the control and freedom that I have in self-publishing, however it is a LOT of work to do it well, and discoverability is a real challenge. But I’m very proud of my books and they’re doing well.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’ll be in flux for a long time.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: My books straddle Women’s fiction and Romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Theresa Rizzo Home Page Link
Link To Theresa Rizzo Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Trey Watson @AuthorTrey


Author Bio:
Trey Watson is a Texas-based author who writes children books and gardening books. He is best known as the author of the Adventures of Mac The Fire Truck series, a book series that follows the zany adventures of a talking fire truck. He is also the author of a book about growing apples in the southern U. S. and a children’s story based on his experience of showing his son his favorite childhood toy (Loved Again).

Trey is also an entrepreneur and is the owner of Legg Creek Farm, LLC (www.leggcreekfarm.com), a company that specializes in fruit producing plants for the southern United States.

Trey and his wife reside in Texas with their son. They are expecting a second child in November. 2012. When he’s not working or writing, Trey enjoys reading, taking quiet walks in the woods, and playing in the creek with his son.

What inspires you to write?
I guess it took having a child to really make me tap into the creative part of me. I’ve always had a vivid imagination, to the point that my mind runs wild when I try to fall asleep at night. For some reason, having a child caused me to tap into that flow of creativity. My son and his love for fire trucks is what inspired me to start writing. The fact that he likes the stories, as do apparently thousands of other children, keeps that inspiration fresh.

I was looking for a talking fire truck who could, in some ways, be a role model. I didn’t find one, so I decided to create it myself.

Tell us about your writing process
I flesh out the broad ideas for the stories during the day and bounce them off my son in the evening. If that goes over well, I start to work on the details of the story. Usually in the evening when the house is quiet, I start writing the rough draft, focusing on rhythm and rhyming words.

I am the worst at making typos, so I have a couple of people who edit for me to catch my mistakes, both in terms of typos or mistakes in logic. I know what your thinking…mistakes in logic in a children’s book? Yeah, it happens! :)

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I imagine them, but I don’t talk to them. I watch them talk to each other!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
This is an interesting question. I am self-published (I like to say “indie”) and I thought long and hard about publishing this way. Ultimately, for me it was about control and timing. Traditional publishing takes time and typically authors lose at least some creative control. I am a “doer” – I like to get things done. Waiting for traditional publishing to happen seemed like waste of time (no offense intended to anyone!:). Plus in traditional publishing, it is still up to the author, especially new authors, to do most of their own promotion. I opted for self-publishing because if I am going to do most of the promotion, I wanted most of the profit :)

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think ebooks will increase their domination in the market place. When I published the first Mac The Fire Truck book as a Kindle ebook, there were fewer than 900 children’s books in the Kindle store. Now there are close to 2000. I think that even in children’s literature we will see more ebooks, and more interactive ebooks for mobile devices.

What do you use?
Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Children’s, gardening

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Author Home Page Link
Link To Author Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
http://www.facebook.com/MacTheFireTruck
http://www.twitter.com/AuthorTrey

Interview with Author – Liz Parker

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About Liz Parker:
Liz Parker was born in Northern Ireland, just outside of Belfast on the banks of the Lagan. Leaving Ireland at 17, she travelled for a few years. Eventually moving to Africa with her new Glaswegian husband and staying for 14 years. Her family finally settled in Australia, and with 2 children and 1 grandson their home is south of Brisbane. Now an empty nester they live with 2 lively puppies and 5 acres of garden to keep busy.

After 20+ years in senior management and CEO roles, Liz decided to start her own home-based business in 2006 and she never looked back. Passionate about helping women in business and a very keen interest in the online world. She wrote her first book in partnership with 3 others which was for the solopreneur. She then branched into a children’s non-fiction book on crocodiles and alligators because her grandson loves them so much and she wanted to make sure she had all the “right” answers to his questions. She enjoyed that experience so much that she decided to continue to write on a range of eclectic topics, from business to blogging and more children’s books.

What inspires you to write?
After years of writing technical and board reports, I started blogging for my business. I was very nervous the first few times I published because I thought that no-one would be interested. After the first couple of articles I realized that I was writing for myself rather than an audience and if people enjoyed them then that was a bonus. My first book that was published was a joint effort with 3 other writers and that got me started. My most recent book is a picture book on crocodiles because my 2 year old grandson loves them and I wanted to do the research so that I could answer all his questions.

Tell us about your writing process.
I brain storm topics and do some online research to see if there are any gaps in the category I want to write in. I also have a look to see if there is another way to present the book which is why I went with a picture book because the other books were all factual.

I then break down what I want to say into main heading which become my chapters and after that a break down each heading into sub headings. Then I do the research again on each of the sub-headings to make sure I am covering everything. I sometimes outsource sections that I find are a bit boring and then edit that.

After that its the images – I like to use www.fiverr.com to get the images done in a similar format.

What advice would you give other writers?
Just start – I found it the hardest part because I was so nervous. Once I started writing it seemed to flow.

Allocate time each day to do some writing, even if its just a paragraph. If you miss one day, then make up for it the next day. Be consistent.

Don’t be afraid to outsource – it can help you get your book on the shelves quicker.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I wanted to experience self-publishing to see how difficult or easy it was. Now that I have done it twice I would definitely go down that path again.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think books will be around for a very long time. eBooks will develop and more and more people will use electronic readers.

What do you use?: Ghostwriter, Co-writer, Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: business, children, non fiction

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print

Website(s)
Liz Parker Home Page Link
Link To Liz Parker Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Twitter

Interview with Author – Keyanna Ford

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About Keyanna Ford:
​Keyanna was born and raised in Kalamazoo, MI, she has always been into school but never knew exactly what she wanted to do. She graduated from Loy Norrix High School in 2005 with high honor and went to college where she studied Criminal Justice at Kalamazoo Valley Community College first then went on to get her bachelors at Western Michigan University where she doubled major and graduated with two majors in Criminal Justice and Social Psychology. After going through a bad situation Keyanna decided to write about it where she discovered her love for writing and that’s how her debut novel “Living in Fear’ came to life.

What inspires you to write?
I was going throught a bad relationship and I would usually read a book to escape my life but this time I decided to write it down. I wrote and wrote and before I knew it I had wrote five chapters to my book. I sent it to my friends and they loved it and Living in Fear was born.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’ve never been the type of person to write an outline, not even in school. The first thing I do is think about my book in three parts, the beginning, middle and end. I’ll get the key points in my head and sit down and write until that point. I also write at night while the rest of the world is sleeping, I’m a night owl.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes, I talk to my characters. I usually get into character and try to become them and write the I think they wold react. I’ve always talked to myself which is why I think it’s easier for me to get into my characters.

What advice would you give other writers?
I would tell them not to give up. I wanted my book to be published on a specific publishing company but i didn’t make the cut but I also didnt give up. I researched other publishing companies and sent my manuscript out and got a few offers, I chose to go with the best one that fit my needs. I believe everything happens for a reason and rejection is part of life.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I researched the different ways of publishing and I chose to go with a publisher. I went with a publisher because I couldn’t afford to self publish, I also wanted someone who knew something about the business in my corner since it was my first book.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’s become easier and easier to publish a book and unfortunately it’s making it harder and harder for publishing companies. I also think it’s making the market go down unfortunately and that’s not good for authors or the quality of the books.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Professional Editor

What genres do you write?: Contemporary Fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Keyanna Ford Home Page Link
Link To Keyanna Ford Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Laura May

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About Laura May:
Laura is an Australian who keeps forgetting she’s meant to stay in the same place. She loves adventures-which is good, because she’s constantly winding up in the middle of them. When she’s not accidentally finding herself in the middle of a riot, being tear-gassed or jumping into frozen rivers, she enjoys sailing, snowboarding, and making an obnoxious number of puns.

You can follow Laura and her latest adventures at www.explaura.net

What inspires you to write?
The easier question would be ‘what *doesn’t* inspire you to write?’ I find there to be so much magic in the world, and with a little imagination, even the most mundane situation becomes an exciting adventure. Travelling definitely inspires me (and I write all about my travels and experiences living in other countries on my blog at explaura.net), but so do the people I meet, the things I see and experience.

Tell us about your writing process.
I usually know the messages I want to convey, who the characters are, and the peak of the story. I don’t always know where it will end up, however, as the characters usually disagree with me! I use EverNote to capture all of my ideas and the things I want to include, and organise in there. I’ve also dabbled with using yWriter.

As far as actually getting things down on paper, I can’t hand-write so it’s a case of sitting down at my laptop, closing down Facebook / reddit / Goodreads, and making myself do some work. When I was trying to get Pickles and Ponies finished, I would take my laptop on the commute to and from work every day, and even if it was only 300 words done on the train, it all still got me closer to the end point. Then it was redrafting to take out the authorial intrusion and refine things, another draft to restructure it into a more logical structure, and refinements following suggestions from beta readers.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t listen or talk to my characters, but I *do* get a bit irked when they won’t do what I want!! They really do take on lives of their own, and even if you’ve got the book all planned out, sometimes the characters have their own ideas and won’t do what they’re told. Luckily, I love them anyway!

What advice would you give other writers?
Perhaps just to stop procrastinating, and get to work! A lot of people say that they’d like to write a book someday, and then it becomes this sort of unattainable ‘I’ll do it when I have time’ or ‘I’ll do it once I finish x y z’ thing. Also, bonus advice – write down your ideas, even the crazy ones! I always have a notepad on me, or a phone to make notes on, so that if something comes to me in the middle of the night or some such, the idea hasn’t escaped by morning.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I wrote my first novel after promising my grandmother that I would, and my priority was just to get it into her hands. Getting traditionally published takes a lot longer, and at the end of the day, I can’t envisage a future where I’m not writing – but I’m not aspiring to write full-time. Self-publishing lets my friends, family and blog followers read the books, so it meets all of my needs. Maybe things will change in the future – who knows?

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think ebooks are definitely the way forward. I’ve been a devout ebook reader for around five years now, and the convenience of having your entire library on you when you’re commuting or travelling is unsurpassed. I like to think that book prices will come down with the lower overheads, but I’d also like to see some quality control in the process somewhere: there are a lot of free ebooks out there, but most of them are unreadably bad. That’s where I see the role of sites such as this and reading social networks (a la goodreads) are so valuable – they help people to discover new authors that are worth reading, so that we don’t wind up in the situation of ‘all self-published books = bad, all traditionally-published books = good’.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: fantasy, comedy, tragedy, historical, absurd

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Laura May Home Page Link
Link To Laura May Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter