Interview with Author – Linda Kovic-Skow

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About Linda Kovic-Skow:
Linda Kovic-Skow is a best-selling author in travel in France. Originally from Seattle, she currently winters in Gilbert, Arizona and spends summers on a boat in the San Juan Islands. She earned an Associate Degree in Medical Assisting in 1978 from North Seattle Community College and a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration from Seattle University in 1985. She has been married for 29 years and has two daughters. An enthusiastic traveler, Linda also enjoys hiking, boating, gardening and socializing with friends. “French Illusions: My Story as an American Au Pair in the Loire Valley,” was her debut memoir. The sequel, “French Illusions: From Tours to Paris,” recounts the rest of her adventure in France.

What inspires you to write?
In 2007, after my husband and I dropped our youngest daughter off at college, I went through a sort of mid-life crisis. I missed being a mom and I wondered how I would fill the void. Sure I had my part-time bookkeeping business, but it consumed only a few hours a day and it wasn’t interesting any more. Something was missing, but what?

This prompted me to review what I like to call my “mid-life list.” This is similar to a “bucket list,” with an important twist. The idea was to refocus myself and figure out the things I wanted to do with my life in my fifties – while I could still do them. My list was short.

-Learn to play the piano
-Travel to Africa to see the elephants
-Travel to Tahiti and see the island of Bora Bora
-Write a book

At the time, I didn’t own a piano and, with two daughters in college, I couldn’t afford a trip to Africa or Tahiti, so that left me to examine the fourth item on my list more closely. If I did write a book, would it be fiction or non-fiction? What genre would I choose?

The answers to my questions came to me in the shower (which is where many of my ideas seem to materialize, strangely enough). I decided to hunt down my diary from my au pair adventure in France and compose a memoir. It took me three years and countless hours to write my first book, and a year and a half to write the sequel, but now I can scratch another item off my mid-life list.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have to admit writing the French Illusions series was a lot more complex than I initially imagined it would be. My diary offered a great outline, but I realized early on that I would have to change the names of people and places in my stories to protect identities. This was especially true with regard to my host au pair family in book one. Acquiring permission from them was out of the question. Totally out of the question. If you read my memoir, you’ll understand. Additionally, over thirty years had passed since I spoke with anyone I’d met in France. I no longer had any contact information. With this in mind, I researched common French names that might fit my characters. I tried them out and retained the ones that were a good fit.

Other decisions haunted me along the way. Where would I find elusive data on the Loire Valley, the Loire River and the town of Tours? How would I find data on Paris from 1979? Hundreds of internet searches supplied most of the data and French editors filled in the the remaining blanks. Editors also helped me decide on how much French to sprinkle throughout the book and how to deal with my inner thoughts? Oh, and I really struggled with how much detail to include in my own love scenes. Wiping the sweat off my brow, I wrote and then rewrote these parts until I could read them aloud without squirming in my seat.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
More than once I scolded myself after I read a particularly disturbing entry in my diary. Something a long the lines of “What in the world were you thinking when you did that?”

What advice would you give other writers?
Hire a professional editor. I mean it. You can’t edit your own book. You won’t see the mistakes because you are too close to the writing. It will cost you a few hundred dollars for a line editor, a bit more if you need some in-depth editing, but it’s the best money you will ever spend. I cringe every time I read a negative review where the main complaint is editing. You want readers to judge you on the content of your story.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Once my manuscript was fully edited, I fashioned a query letter and emailed selected agents interested in memoirs. Several weeks passed and I received a handful of politely-worded rejections. In the end, self-publishing appeared to be my best option. Without an English degree or published articles, I knew there was very little chance I’d snag an agent.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The trend seems clear to me – self-publishing will become more and more popular, eBooks will dominate the market, and print books sales will decline.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: narrative nonfiction (memoir)

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print

Website(s)
Linda Kovic-Skow Home Page Link
Link To Linda Kovic-Skow Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Kelly Tonelli

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About Kelly Tonelli:
Kelly Tonelli is a clinical psychologist working in private practice with patients who are experiencing life transitions, many of whom are teenage girls. She happily relocated from Michigan to Southern California to attend Pepperdine University and fell in love with the sunshine (snow is cold). She’s been fortunate to have spent time working and learning at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA) before going into private practice. She divides her time between her practice, writing, spending time with her husband, and driving her daughter to dance class.

What inspires you to write?
I am inspired by the teenage girls I meet each day whether personally or professionally. They are such an amazing mixture of child and adult.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am both an outliner and a seat of the pants writer! I like to sketch out what I am hoping to write in very general terms, but leave the details to be added as I go. Sometimes letting myself have the freedom to “just write” allows me to take paths I never expected!

What advice would you give other writers?
Just get started. Sometimes staring at the blank page (or flashing cursor) can be paralyzing. You just need to put words down – there is always room to edit later as needed. You don;t have to force each word to be gold – that happens later in editing!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I did a lot of research to see which path was the bests fit for me and my book, This is a personal choice. You have to go with your own gut.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Yikes! Big question! I am in no way an expert in publishing. My minimal experience tells me that the industry is changing. Publishers no longer have unlimited budgets and amazing advances are as rare as finding a unicorn! E-books seem to be the way it is going.

What do you use?: Professional Editor

What genres do you write?: Non-fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Link To Kelly Tonelli Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Anita Philmar

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About Anita Philmar:
Anita Philmar enjoys writing hot stories to get the blood a pumping. She grew up in Texas and enjoys sharing information about the state with her readers.
Currently, she is working on a historical series call Naked Bluff, Texas. No, it is not a real place, but the people there do have problems and with the gift of love they do find happiness.

Just for fun–
What is your favourite drink? Arnold Palmer – Tea and Lemonade
Are you a cat or dog person? Dog – have a small terrior.
Love or lust? Both, One helps grow the other in my book.
If you could spend the day with any famous author, who would it be? And, why? Mark Twain – love the way he looked at life.

Do you laugh at your own jokes?
Yes, because no one in my household thinks I’m funny. Men have no sense of humor.

Are you fun to go on vacation with?
I like to think so. I enjoy seeing new things and love to travel.

If you came with a warning label, what would it say?
Proceed with caution, this woman is known to cry over sad movies and make you burn with her smoking, hot, sex scenes. She’s loyal, kind, and fun to snuggle with but hurt anyone she loves and she’ll cause you intense pain while relishing every moment of your suffering. Best to avoid if not looking for a lifetime commitment because friends are for life, lovers are forever, and enemies live in hell.

What inspires you to write?
Inspiration can come from many places. I find it in so many places with the people I meet, the shows I watch, the internet. I believe if you have a creative mind, you are always envisioning new and crazy things.

Most of my current stories come from a love of Texas. My Naked Bluff, Texas series allows me to step back in time and reveal history with a twist. I like exposing readers to the state I love so for me this is an inspiration to share fact about Texas along with a love story.

Tell us about your writing process.
It may sound fun but what inspired me to start writing was an author interview on a talk show. The author said she wrote in her pj’s. And even though, she wrote hot scenes she didn’t get excited.

I couldn’t imagine she was telling the truth. I mean if you want your readers to get hot how can you not get hot?

So I decide to give writing a hot book a shot. My first book Black Dragon Blood was to me a hot book. Then I just couldn’t stop. Writing, reading, there is a thrill in both.

I started out as a pants but have learned to be a outliner.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes, I talk to my characters. I spend time with them and carry on conversations with them. They are my friends and my enemies.

Which can make for a fun day, if they both want to give me help advice at the same time.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write, and don’t sweat the small stuff. We all struggle with different areas of writing but if you just allow your creative mind to flow. You can fix the rest later.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My first books were with The Wild Rose Press. I still work with them, but I enjoy creating a few self-published books too.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It’s a wild ride that people are enjoying at the moment. There will be winners and losers. Who knows where the ride will take us.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Fantasy, alternate worlds, erotic romance, futuristic

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Anita Philmar Home Page Link
Link To Anita Philmar Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – RM Alexander

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About RM Alexander:
RM Alexander is an author of suspenseful clean romances that are sometimes contemporary, sometimes paranormal, and are always ruled by the heart of true romance.

With characters who look for love in the wrong places while being victims of the worse kind of betrayals, RM’s novels promise a good read with unexpected twists and turns.

When she’s not writing, RM Alexander spends time with her husband and two children in Michigan. She loves to travel, especially to Walt Disney World. She is often found on Facebook and Twitter visting with fans and other authors.

What inspires you to write?
Inspiration comes from many different places – dreams, songs, a random idea while cooking dinner. Some of them don’t work out and sit in a file on my computer for years, others I start the same day the inspiration strikes.

Tell us about your writing process.
My writing process has changed and has been fine-tuned over the years. I’ve written by the seat of my pants, and it turned out okay, but mostly, I prefer to outline. My outlines are fairly vague – the main points of a story arc written in one or two sentences per chapter. I do character sketches for each main character, but what I really love to do is storyboard via Pinterest. It allows me to have a visual que for what I am planning. It’s helpful to me, and I hope fun for my readers too!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I listen to my characters, I talk to them. Mostly, they don’t listen and decide very early on where a story is headed. If I try to lead them, the writing becomes near impossible to finish. There’s been many times, in nearly every book I’ve written, that I’ve been surprised where the story ended up. That outline I mentioned? It’s changed many times over for each book.

What advice would you give other writers?
There’s so many lessons you learn launching out on a writing career. You learn you have to have a thick skin, because not everyone is going to like your work and some will even bash it. You learn to look for support, learn from and reach back and help, others in the writing community. You learn to never stop learning your craft. And you learn to never give up. Some days, you won’t feel like doing the writing anymore – writer’s doubts are brutal – and days you know you are the luckiest person in the world to be able to call this your career – because you are. I’m still learning, and I suspect I will for as long as I choose to be a writer.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I started out wanting to go the traditional route and queried agents for months. But traditional publishing is a difficult and competitive route to take. There are thousands of authors wanting an agent, and agents can only take on so many new authors at any given time.

Through a writing friend, I learned more about self publishing and decided to go that route. I’ve since published five books with many more on the way, and as difficult as self publishing can be (no one else to help market your book, no marketing dollars, etc.) it’s also very rewarding.

I would suggest to any new author to explore their options and go with what works best for them – everyone’s journey is an individual one. If you choose self-publishing, meet as many authors as you can via social media. Get to know them and learn from them – networking is an invaluable key to your career. Plus, you’ll meet so many new friends!

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It’s hard to say. Traditional publishing will always have it’s place, though my guess is that it’s share of the market will continue to diminish to some degree. Self-publishing is here to stay, and authors will continue to have to use their creativity to find new ways to reaching their audience.

What genres do you write?: Clean Romantic suspense, contemporary romantic suspense, paranomal thriller

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
RM Alexander Home Page Link
Link To RM Alexander Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Bev Spicer

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About Bev Spicer:
I started writing stories when I was a child, reading them to my sisters, who were generally quite demanding, wanting to know what happened next. They didn’t like the idea of a cliffhanger!

At school I soon realised that I wanted to specialise in literature and languages, which I went on to study at Keele university. Following that, I gained a PGCE at Queens’ College Cambridge and took up teaching posts in Greece, Seychelles and finally at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge.

Five years later, I moved to France with my husband and two youngest children, where I am lucky enough to be able to write every day.

I have several ebooks on Amazon and most of them are available in paperback, too. I have a number of works in progress – the next one to be published will be a collection of short stories. I already have a number of individual short stories available as ebooks if you would like to try one.

I write in many genres, including humour, mystery, psychological drama and science fiction, but always with an eye for detail and a desire to create believable and complex characters.

What inspires you to write?
I get inspired by ideas that come from conversations, news items, pictures, and reading other books. Usually, it’s a character who catches my imagination and I begin to hang a plot around him or her. This process happens almost involuntarily, with scenarios going round in my mind until I am more or less obliged to get out my laptop! Sometimes there are multiple book ideas going on at the same time, which can be a bit of a challenge.

Tell us about your writing process.
I don’t use post-its or charts or story-boards. I’ve tried all of these methods, but, with a good laptop, I can edit and re-write much more easily than juggling bits of paper with illegible notes on. The initial planning takes place in my head and involves gaining an overview of the project before diving in. In one of her online interviews, Margaret Atwood used imagery that I think expresses perfectly the actual process of getting a story down ‘on paper’. She describes a ‘rolling action’ similar to ranks of soldiers advancing with rifles; the ones at the front, having fired, crouch down to allow the ones behind to move forward. Thus, as I write, I am constantly thinking ahead to what comes next. I might get shot in the back occasionally, but I generally survive.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Of course! I try not to do it out loud though. People in my small French village already have me down as an eccentric English woman with gigantic children. My Characters can do things I would never dream of doing in real life. That’s the fun of it. They have idiosyncrasies, values, aspirations, flaws. I have to know them inside out to be able to write from their point of view. When I’m buying a baguette, I might be wondering how it feels to watch my father preparing a body for viewing at a funeral, as happens in The Undertaker’s Son. Or I might be falling in love with a man who might never be mine, as Martha Burton does in the same novel.

What advice would you give other writers?
This is a really impossible question to answer. It always makes me feel as though I might be teaching my grandmother to suck eggs. Things I have learned over the years are mostly to do with meticulous editing, proofreading, endless re-writing and never ignoring any niggling doubts you may have about a dubious paragraph/chapter or a lame piece of dialogue. Unfortunately, along with a large number of professional independent writers, there are those who, for one reason or another, end up publishing work that is not fit to be published. I have to say, though, that having recently read a wonderful novel by Rose Tremain, traditionally published authors are not immune to (a large number of) errors and typos. Sorry, Rose.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When Kindle Direct Publishing came along I’d just finished writing ‘Bunny on a Bike’. I looked into the process of submitting to traditional publishers, tried a few – with very proscriptive letters, synopses, sample chapters, etc, then thought the independent route seemed much more, well, independent. I like the total control I have and I believe that, in the end, if a book is good enough, it will succeed. I do have my fingers crossed when not at the keyboard…

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
No idea. Who would have said that KDP would come along? I suppose it might go up in a puff of smoke and leave us all bereft at some point. Who has time to worry about the future, anyway?

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Humour, Psychological Drama, Mystery, Suspense, Science Fiction, Metaphysical.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Bev Spicer Home Page Link
Link To Bev Spicer Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Dennis Santaniello

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About Dennis Santaniello:
Dennis Santaniello is the author of the epic screenplay trilogy “Conquistadors”, the WWI novel “Sergei and Hans”, and co-author of the screenplay “The Ottoman”.

Born and raised in New Jersey, so, yeah, he has a bit of an edge to him. It’s not his fault.

What inspires you to write?
I always wanted to be a writer. Now I am. Everything inspires me. I’m always thinking and always breaking things down.

For inspiration, I listen to music, podcasts and watch a ton of movies.

Tell us about your writing process.
I write when I can, but I write everyday. I use Scrivener and never looked back. I also use an analog notebook called a “Baron Fig”.

Generally, I break down the story as much as I can. I’m a big believer in the 3 act structure for novels and screenplays. Then I delve into the story at what ever scene I’m ready to write.

Writing can be bliss when you’re really going, but it can be painful and damaging. You just have to slog through them.

And that’s what I do.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I listen to my characters, and type what they say. Sorta like a court stenographer.

What advice would you give other writers?
A writer writes. Clue’s in the title. If you’re a writer, and you’re not writing, you’re wasting time. Get it done.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Rejection is a tough thing for each writer to deal with. I had it in spades. SO…one day, I put my books on Amazon, and I never looked back.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I hope Self Publishing strangles Traditional Publishing to a noble submission.

What do you use?: Co-writer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, Children’s Books

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To Dennis Santaniello Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Elizabeth Davies

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About Elizabeth Davies:
Elizabeth Davies was born and raised in South Wales more years ago than she cares to remember. She lived in England for nearly two decades but returned to her roots when she felt the mountains of her youth calling to her, and hiking in her beloved Brecon Beacons is now one of the joys in her life. When she is not working as a full time secretary, Elizabeth loves spending time with her family, hates doing necessary chores, and tries to fit in writing whenever she can. She has published several books: the Resurrection trilogy, beginning with “State of Grace”, continuing with “Amazing Grace”, and ending with “Sanctifying Grace”, “The Spirit Guide and most recently – The Medium Path. She is currently working on another paranormal romance set in Wales.
She is also seriously addicted to chocolate.

What inspires you to write?
I honestly don’t know. There is such alot of hard work,and soul-searching and frustration involved in writing a novel, as well as the satisfaction of putting your story down on paper (so to speak), that sometimes I wonder why I write. But then then stories build up and demand to be let out, and I have no choice but to give them their freedom.

Tell us about your writing process.
Oh, I’m definitely a panster! I get an idea, have a beginning and a vague idea what happens at the end, but everything in between is a mystery to me until I write it.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I talk to my MC’ s in the middle of the night, getting to know them intimately. I have been known to hold whole conversations in my head with them…

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep writing. Don’t lose sight of your main purpose – writing books – and get too caught up in social media and ‘author presence’.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
No one else would have me! Seriously, it’s hard to break into the traditional publishing scene in the UK, so I decided to self publish after the umpteenth rejection. Mind you, perhaps all the agents I submitted to might have been trying to tell me something…

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Ebooks and reading electronically is the way the world is going. Even schools are increasingly using iPads and other tablets on a regular basis during lessons. However you feel about the rightness or wrongness of this, the facts cannot be altered.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: paranormal romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Elizabeth Davies Home Page Link
Link To Elizabeth Davies Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Heather Scrooby

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About Heather Scrooby:
I was born in Boston, England, to South African parents. I moved to Scotland for a brief period when I was five before going to Chegutu, a tiny town in Zimbabwe, where I spent my happy junior years. I moved to South Africa when I was in Standard 5 and have remained here ever since. I moved from Durban to Johannesburg for my wonderful husband. We now share two amazing children.

I love all animals, especially dogs (of which I am a qualified fun agility coach and Dog Behaviorist) and horses. I love reading and writing, which I am certain is why I enjoy studying too. I have worked in IT and accounting for the majority of my working career.

I hope you enjoy reading my stories and would love to hear any comments and thoughts you have.

What inspires you to write?
I started writing when I was up in the middle of the night caring for my new born son. When my mother read what I had started she encouraged me to finish… and I am glad I did. Since then I have found inspirations for new stories in all different places. I wish I had the time to write down all the ideas!

Tell us about your writing process.
I do a bit of outlining and also allow my characters to lead me too :) Once I have an idea for a story, I break it down into chapters, with each chapter having a ‘goal’. I write the idea I had on the first page and the direction for each chapter under that chapters heading. I then let my characters do what they will! This way I can write jump to and from different parts of the story and still-hopefully-keep the plot whole :)

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters often bring something new to the book-an interesting sideline plot-and most of the time I listen and agree with them. It is the extras they bring that end up making the book so much better :)

What advice would you give other writers?
Being a self-published author is hard work. I am still trying to learn how to market my books :) The only advice I can give you is to finish your book, if you have not already. It is an achievement to get those final words down. If you have already written your first book, make sure you go over it at least twice before you send it to someone to read. The more you edit (self or paid), the more others will enjoy your stories.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I approached a publishing company for my first book Amnesia. Only one (and I had not yet learnt to read over my own work once it was done!), I was turned down and for some time I left it at that. But with my mother’s support I looked at self-publishing eBooks and at first thought Amazon and Smashwords were far too complex for me. However, I persevered and in actual fact it was not as hard as I imagined once I sat down and focused on it. And I am so glad I did.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Although printed books will always have a place with readers, eBooks are quick, convenient and (generally) cheaper than your traditional printed books. I definitely feel eBooks are the future of book publishing.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Romance, young adult fiction, social issues and many more to come :)

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Heather Scrooby Home Page Link
Link To Heather Scrooby Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Lindsay Edmunds

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About Lindsay Edmunds:
Lindsay Edmunds lives a quiet normal life in southwestern Pennsylvania after more than twenty interesting years in Washington, D.C. In 1988 she acquired a used Mac Plus, MacWrite, MacPaint, and a dot-matrix printer. These things changed her life.

Speculative fiction, literary fiction, magical realism, spirituality, social commentary, humor, alternative history, coming of age—all those labels apply to her writing, sometimes simultaneously. She writes the kind of stories she likes to read: tales that mix it up, that show a lot of colors.

Her highest ambition is that her stories be true “in the way that stories are true,” to quote Nancy Willard, who wrote the wonderful novel Things Invisible to See.

She believes that everybody has stories to tell. If you doubt it, get someone talking about their job. It doesn’t matter what kind of job it is. You will hear tales of intrigue, heroics, deviltry, and lessons learned. People will talk with great insight about their experiences and in doing so, will tell you about themselves.

Everybody sees a lot. Everybody knows a lot.

What inspires you to write?
Writing brings out the best in me.

Tell us about your writing process.
Last year I started using Scrivener to make notes on stories before I write them. I am much more of an outliner than I used to be, but even with the best pre-planning, I don’t know everything about where a story wants to go.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
A lot of writers do this, but I honestly don’t. Sometimes I get stuck — I can’t see any good way forward. Almost always, the problem is that I want the storyline to go in some direction that is wrong for a character. So in that sense, my characters talk to me.

What advice would you give other writers?
Be prepared: writing and self-publishing require an excess of virtue. You need to be committed, hard working, patient, thick-skinned, gracious, willing to spend long hours doing research, and willing and able to spend money (eg, on professional editing). There might or might not be a financial reward for doing all of those things. All that, and you need talent, too.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to self-publish in 2011 after getting an agent for my first novel, CEL & ANNA. She was a good agent but couldn’t sell the book. Self-publishing has enabled many good things that never would have occurred otherwise.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I’m in no position to comment on such a big question. I wonder, though, about the future of readers. I am one myself, and I am burning out from too much choice.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: speculative fiction, science fiction, literary fiction, women’s fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lindsay Edmunds Home Page Link
Link To Lindsay Edmunds Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Mikal Nielsen

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About Mikal Nielsen:
Mikal Nielsen is a life & business coach, helping individuals & teams to get more life out of life and more business out of business. He is also an international public and keynote speaker.
Mikal lives in New Zealand, where he has been featured on National TV & Radio, and in several newspapers and magazines.
His profound understanding of human nature – in particular the mind – comes from more than 30 years of exploration in a multitude of ways. This includes traveling to well over 50 countries ‘studying’ many different cultures, along with deeply questioning his own life and life itself.
With a passion for growth, Mikal has be coaching this for over 20 years. As a part of that, he has created a number of online systems to support people in living happier and more fulfilling lives. This includes the ‘Living on Purpose Skype Program’, ‘Modern Meditation for the Modern World’ and the ‘Mindful Minute Method’. He also hosts his own WebTV Show ‘Awareness – The Key to the Driver Seat’.

What inspires you to write?
Writing for me, serves two purposes. One, if helps me create a deeper level of clarity of that which I’m trying to convey to my audience. Two, it allows me to reach a global audience that can benefit from my knowledge and experience.

Tell us about your writing process.
I love Mind Maps, so that’s where I start. First, it’s a general Mind Map of what I can potentially put into this book, kind of a brain storming session. Then, I turn the Mind Map into an outline, but maintaining some of the Mind Map methods to keep it creative. This becomes the backbone of the book, what is going to be in it, and it mostly defines the chapter headings, although that will change and evolve as the writing unfolds.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write your book fast! Commit to say 1 hour a day and you will have a book completed in one month or less. My new book “The Quick Fix To Any Problem” was written in 25 days. Writing fast makes you super focussed and creates a momentum that carries you through the tough times, including the typical ‘writers block’.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
These days, self-publishing is becoming easier and easier with the use of technology, great software and platforms like Amazon Kindle. It was an easy choice for me to choose self-publish

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the current trend of more and more self-publishing will continue.
With that, there will be an increasing challenge of how to distinguish between worth buying books and worthless junk. This will mean that there will be a bigger and bigger need for sites like this one (Book Goodies) where people can check out books before buying.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Self-Help. Business & Money

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Mikal Nielsen Home Page Link
Link To Mikal Nielsen Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Scott Finazzo

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About Scott Finazzo:
Scott Finazzo was born and raised in the Midwest. His life is a balance of triumph and tragedy. He is a full time firefighter and has written two disaster books: the national bestseller The Prepper’s Workbook as well as the disaster response book titled Neighborhood Emergency Response Handbook. When he isn’t riding on the fire truck and responding to emergencies he spends his time in search of travel and adventure. His adventures has taken him to various parts of the country and world and include sailing, kayaking, climbing, surfing, SCUBA diving, hiking, and just about any other adventure opportunity that has crossed his path. You can read about one such adventure in his book about he and two friends building sea kayaks and shipping them down to explore the Virgin Islands called Why Do All the Locals Think We’re Crazy?

What inspires you to write?
Life. I’m fascinated by experiences. People, communication, and interaction are a constant source of inspiration and evaluation.

Tell us about your writing process.
Unfortunately my process wouldn’t work for most. I am undisciplined and write only when inspired. I write for fun and a creative outlet. When it starts feeling like an obligation, I find that I stop enjoying the process and the end result isn’t what I had hoped. I am my own worst critic. My process is usually to write until the well runs dry, be it a paragraph or 100 pages, and then walk away for a few days, maybe a week. When I return to re-read, that’s when I either hate myself or pat myself on the back.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I’m just starting to begin fiction writing and try to put myself in the mindset of the characters. In the books that I love reading, I think you get the trust sense of the character when you are in their head.

What advice would you give other writers?
Do it if you love to do it. If you’re just doing it to create income, it will come across that way.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’ve used both traditional publishers as well as self publishing and see advantages to both. Traditional publishers offer the upfront money of an advance. But, more importantly, they offer you the sense of being a real writer because you have a book contract. They do all the leg work of getting your books to retail outlets and even provide you with a publicist to help with promotion. The downside is they make most of the money from your book.

Self publishing offers complete freedom and far better profit/book. You are in control of everything. The downside is, you are in control of EVERYTHING. It’s a blessing as well as a burden.

Personally, I enjoy having the security and assistance of a traditional publisher to offer assistance and feedback. I can just focus on writing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I see self publishing taking over. With e-readers growing like they are, the traditional publishers are less in demand. Authors don’t need them like they once did.

What do you use?: Co-writer, Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: safety, personal narrative, fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Scott Finazzo Home Page Link
Link To Scott Finazzo Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Dean Liguori

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About Dean Liguori:
In 2000 A.D., I experienced physical eye trauma to one eye resulting in an injury that was compounded by an erroneous medical prescription designed to treat the injury. The combined trauma and damage caused by the prescription drug resulted in severely limited vision in my injured eye.

Unable to accept the result of this injury, I embarked on a mission to overcome it. As a result of the damage I sustained, I had the opportunity to interact with accomplished doctors in many prestigious universities and institutions. I participated in events and seminars that only doctors were invited to and engaged in all available rehabilitation. I researched and sought all information, studies, and associated work on vision impairment and restoration that I could get my hands on.

One important observation of this journey was the adherence of most of the vision industry to the medical model of healing. This failed model takes a general approach to correcting vision problems by mitigating symptoms without offering any solution to the underlying disorder.

One important discovery of this journey was the field of sequencing neurosensory and neuromuscular activities that are individually prescribed to develop, rehabilitate, and enhance visual skills and information processing. This field is also referred to as vision therapy.

My journey resulted in the restoration of my vision. The restoration of the vision of others that I shared these concepts with motivated me to develop my “Vision Therapy System” that I now share with you in this book.

What inspires you to write?
Sharing learned knowledge to help others overcome challenges.

Tell us about your writing process.
I begin with outlining an idea or concepts and add detail to them. As these unfold, I better organize them in a manner and order that I believe would make sense to the reader. In the particular case of this book, more detail, expansion of ideas, and work from other writings were brought into this work over the period of many years which made the final organization and editing more challenging.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write on something that you are passionate about. Do not chose a topic for purposes of generating revenue or you will not be happy in your work and any readers of your work will be able to determine it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I have approached publishers in the past on different works and did not need the additional work or stress to interview and hire one. I believe that the opportunity is present for self publishers to replace the duties of a publisher to an extent. This is especially true for popular writers.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It will continue to evolve as consumers’ demands are better expressed and understood. The internet has shown that it can squeeze out middlemen in a way that intelligent producers can capitalize on.

What genres do you write?: non fiction

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Dean Liguori Home Page Link
Link To Dean Liguori Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit to allow you the reader to hear the author in their own voice.