Interview with Author – JD Byrne

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About JD Byrne:
JD Byrne was born and raised around Charleston, West Virginia, before spending seven years in Morgantown getting degrees in history and law from West Virginia University. He’s practiced law for more than 15 years, writing briefs where he has to stick to real facts and real law. In his fiction, he gets to make up the facts, take or leave the law, and let his imagination run wild. He lives outside Charleston with his wife, one-eyed dog, and black cat.

His first book, The Last Ereph and Other Stories, came out this spring. His first novel, Moore Hollow, will be released on October 5, 2015. His most recent short story, “The Destiny Engine,” is currently available at Amazon.

What inspires you to write?
I think there are two different kinds of inspiration.

The first is about why write at all, whatever it is. Part of the reason I write is that I like to play with words, like figuring out the best way for things to fit together. I’ve been doing that for years in my day job, but as an appellate lawyer you are limited to the real facts of a case. Writing fiction adds the joy of being able to tell whatever stories you like. I get a lot of inspiration just from the idea of having stories to share.

The second is more like the “where do your ideas come from?” question we all get from time to time. I’ve always said that inspiration is everywhere, but one of the great things about writing fantasy and sci-fi is that I can take real world inspiration and jump off toward completely different, exciting new places. A blurb on the news or a stray bit of information on the web can be the foundation of an entire story.

Tell us about your writing process.
I straddle the line between those who plan out everything and those who fly by the seat of their pants. I think there’s a happy medium, a place where I have some idea of where I’m going and who my characters are, but I’m flexible enough to let inspiration or need drive me somewhere else.

So I’ll do some notes on the world in which my story will be told and the main characters. Usually I have a solid idea of who those characters are, what they’re going to do, and how they’ll change through the story. But I tend to create the secondary characters on the fly as the need arises, which leads to some fun discoveries.

For example, next year I will have a trilogy coming out called The Water Road. It’s fantasy and I needed to do some serious foundational work before I started writing. I’ve got a crude map of the place where the story takes place, notes about the religious beliefs of one of the races involved, and a glossary of terms and character names to help me keep them all on track. But none of those survived intact during the writing process. The map got hasty additions when I needed a new place for characters to go and the glossary grew and grew.

As a particular character example, I’m working on a second draft right now of The Endless Hills, which is part two of The Water Road. I didn’t realize I needed a particular character before I got to the part of the story where she was needed. I pulled her out of thin air and she wound up being really interesting to write.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to my characters, I order them around!

I’ve actually never been a fan of thinking of characters as living beings who can talk back to you while writing. One of the great things about writing fiction is that I’m fully in control of what happens, to whom it happens, and when it happens. Having said that, it’s important to make sure that what you want the characters to do makes sense in terms of their motivations, goals, and their personalities as you draw them.

As an example, in my novel Moore Hollow (out October 5) the main character, Ben’s, story was originally about finding the answer to this old mystery and finding this small town’s secret. But by the time he did that it was much more interesting for me to explore what he’d do with that information once he had it. It gave the whole story a structure I hadn’t originally intended, but I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

I guess what I’m saying is that while I can make my characters to anything I want, it’s better to let them figure out what they need to do on their own.

What advice would you give other writers?
Get out there and be a part of the conversation with other writers and with readers. Listen to what those who have already gone through what you’re going through now have to say. Not everything that works for one writer works for another, but you don’t have to start from scratch in all this. I’ve found other writers to be really friendly, free with their time and advice, and supportive.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I didn’t really think about publishing when I started writing. I think I wanted to convince myself I could actually do it first, then worry about what came after. Either that or I had this magical idea that all that would fall into place once I had something I could call a “book” on my hands.

When I had said book I started to explore the trade publishing route, looking for agents and whatnot, but it never really connected with me. It was much more appealing to me to be in full control of things, even if it meant a lot more work on my end and more risk. Whatever else is true, I can’t blame anybody else for how my books perform. That’s frightening at first, but ultimately it’s very liberating.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It’s very much in flux, obviously. I could see a situation where physical books wind up like vinyl records – after a brutal decline in popularity they rebound as a niche item. But I think books as “clumps of words that people read” – in whatever form – are going to keep getting better and better. More writers writing can only be good news for readers. Easier distribution methods means more of an opportunity for writers to find an audience, whether they self publish or work with a small publisher.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Primarily fantasy and science fiction, although things rub up against horror at points.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
JD Byrne Home Page Link
Link To JD Byrne Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Harris Rosen

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About Harris Rosen:
Harris Rosen was born and resides in Toronto, Canada. For twenty years he self-published the national lifestyle magazine Peace! in Canada. He has interviewed hundreds of composers, artists, actors and athletes, including the Notorious B.I.G., Dr. Dre, Ice-T, Daft Punk, Malcolm McLaren, George Clinton, Georges St. Pierre, Lance Mountain, Nirvana, Metallica, Chris Rock, Buju Banton, Sean “Puffy” Combs, Luther Campbell, Beastie Boys, Nas, Eminem, Destiny’s Child, Bobby Brown and Aaliyah to list a select few.

He has traveled to six continents and was in the midst of a whirlwind of multiple musical cultural revolutions that occurred throughout the 90’s and 2000’s, while compiling a true and honest archive of audio, images and video.

What inspires you to write?
I had exhibited multiple elements of A.D.H.D. (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) my entire life and unfortunately brought stress and drama to many people around me and myself throughout the years. Following the birth of my son Louis in 2011, I sought help and was professionally diagnosed that summer. In 2014 I completed an MCBT (Mindfulness Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy) program, and strongly recommend reading or listening to the book Success Through Stillness: Meditation Made Simple by Russell Simmons & Chris Morrow to anyone who is interested in improving their life.

Tell us about your writing process.
The journey of creating In Their Own Words: Behind the Music Tales of Truth, Fiction & Desire began in September 2014. I dug up and pored over hundreds of cassette and micro-cassette tapes and thousands of print photographs. The ability to draw from the original audio recordings is crucial and truly sets this series apart. A 1996 conversation I had with Muggs in L.A. has always stuck in my mind. We met to discuss his upcoming solo debut, Muggs Presents The Soul Assassins, Chapter 1. One month later I was back in Los Angeles to interview Mr. Scarface of the Geto Boys, who was set to release The Untouchable. I called Muggs and he read the cover feature in front of me and said, “You actually wrote what I said”, and thanked me. I was taken aback; Until that day I’d assumed that every interview I read was a true representation of what the artists stated. I was naive. Over the years various artists would tell me that they were often misquoted by the press. The facts twisted in order to fit a format or portray them in a negative light.

Much of what you will read, see and hear here has been sensationalized by others in a manner of journalistic psycho-speak. This series is as close to the truth as one can get. It delivers raw thoughts by real people and is manifested directly in the voice and words of the artists who made it happen. This is their story to tell, with context, images, curated quotes, behind-the-scenes reports, anecdotes and colour.

What advice would you give other writers?
I learned to stop procrastinating and do it. Talking about releasing a book and doing it are two separate things. I have truly enjoyed most of the process and now have several more releases in the works for this year.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I have a deep archive of interviews and a major publishing agreement is certainly in the future, however the groundwork must be laid first. Self-publish your story now, educate yourself, learn the process and enjoy.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
The future of publishing is a manifestation of what is going on now. The market will become more cluttered, however the cream will rise to the top.

What do you use?: Dictated and got transcribed, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Musicians, Composers, Sports, Biography, Art

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To Harris Rosen Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Joannes Rhino

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About Joannes Rhino:
I was born in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1980. I was educated at the local state school until graduation in 1998 and continued to study in Hospitality University. I was then employed by a financial company in Jakarta, where I began to receive many awards related with customer satisfaction. Having been working the same routine for years, I started to write a novel to kill the time. Finally, my first novel “Etzhara” was published by the biggest traditional publisher in Indonesia and made me one of the best young writers under thirty at Khatulistiwa Literary Award in 2009. Feeling confident with the writing skill I had, I published the second novel in the same year by another traditional publisher in Jakarta. I then began to receive many invitations to attend book signings, talk shows, radio interviews, and other literature activities. This second novel made me an overnight success.

Feeling secured in terms of financial and social life, I felt something was missing. The turning over point of my life had occurred when someone handed me a novel by Paulo Coelho “The Alchemist” and a motivational book by Rhonda Byrne “The Secret”. Those books really changed my perspective about life, and that was when I decided to let go of the glamorous life of Jakarta and hit the road. I was 30 at the time. That year, I self-published a collection of poetry in the United Kingdom. This poetry collection was made during the most troublesome moments of my last 10 years of life, when dark clouds enveloped me. Anger, anxiety, emptiness, guilt and lost love coalesced into a single, unbearable emotion.

With all the savings I got from the previous job and book royalties, I traveled to Bali and worked for a timeshare company. Three months was all I needed to understand that it was not what I wanted. I then changed course to a publishing company as an Editor in Chief. As much as I loved dealing with words, my passion to see the world kept haunting me. Finally, I decided to travel to Australia and Thailand for 8 months. It was between 2011 and 2012 when I tried to fit in with a new life; working from farm to farm, hitchhiking from place to place, and volunteering from school to school. I went all around Australia and returned to Bali with tons of stories to tell.

During my journey in Australia, I had written two other novels and got rejected from several publishers in Indonesia because the content was not sellable. Therefore, I translated to English and self-published them with a USA publisher. This huge change made me an international author. However, this achievement did not stop me from pursuing my literature obsessively. I am now working freelance as a ghostwriter, copywriter and scriptwriter.

I am based in no place, as I am still in search for a place called “home”.

What inspires you to write?
I used to be a very quiet person, and tend to keep silent when it comes to giving opinion about something. This situation inspired me to write because I do want to be heard. My inspiration comes from my surrounding and personal life experience. I think it’s easier to express yourself based on what you see and feel.

Tell us about your writing process.
Before I start writing about something, I choose the topic wisely and start doing research. I put note of the things I discover. In terms of writing style, I use my own. Some say my writing style is poetic, well it’s probably because I love poems a lot.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
All of my characters in my books are related with me. They could be myself, my friends or someone I know in real life. Having said so, it’s easier for me to feel the emotions of the characters.

What advice would you give other writers?
Be yourself! That’s very important. I mean, don’t try to write using your favorite author’s writing style. Use your own style, and don’t be afraid to show people what’s inside your head.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I have 2 books published by traditional publishers and I also have several books self-published. It’s actually pros and cons. I mean, of course, having your books published by traditional publishers is an achievement because your works are being appreciated. Meanwhile, if you self publish, you can do it instantly and set your own royalty. As for new authors, I recommend self publish for start because based on my experience it took me a year to see my book on book stores after I signed the agreement.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
People read everyday, and no matter how sophisticated the tech industry would be in the future, at the end of the day people will always be reading books. Publishing company will be exist with new concept of publishing (i.e. publishing ebook).

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Psychology/thriller

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Joannes Rhino Home Page Link
Link To Joannes Rhino Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Kameel Nasr

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About Kameel Nasr:
Kameel Nasr is the author of THE WORLD UP CLOSE, which details parts of his bicycle tour around the world. He is a tango dancer, art and music connoisseur, and the creator of the Curiosity Foundation which aims to promote international tolerance and sustainability.

What inspires you to write?
My writing has been diverse, including how-to books, a personal account of international bike travels, an academic book of Middle East terrorism, and now a Boston-based cozy mystery series. I want to write the type of books I enjoy reading, books that take me to a place I do not know. I was inspired to write a fictional account about the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist because the crime has not been solved, and it gave me an excuse to delve into ancient Greece, one of my favorite topics.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am not, as many other writers, an outliner, except that I have a general idea in my head. I write in three stages. The first is getting words on paper, and for this the number of words is the only thing that is important. Then I go to my first editing which I call producing Good Word, and here the manuscript starts taking shape. Finally there is the serious editing process of making the book interesting and well-written.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Absolutely. I walk around with them, wonder what they would do in various situations. I sometimes look at people and relate them to characters in the book.

What advice would you give other writers?
There’s so much advice out there about the field. My only advice is to read.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I published by traditional publishers, but now I created an imprint: Curiosity Books.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
This is hard to answer at the moment. Certainly Print of Demand and Amazon and self-publishing have changed the book business. I love reading my Kindle but it is limited and will not replace a book because a book is much better for thumbing through. Perhaps ebooks will evolve to be more like real books. I believe it will take a couple of years until be find which direction the industry is heading.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Cozy Mystery, Adventure Travel, Political Science

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Kameel Nasr Home Page Link
Link To Kameel Nasr Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Robin Gregory

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About Robin Gregory:
I‘m a devoted wife and mother, writer, and occasional land surveyor. Born in Pensacola, Florida, I grew up in California, accompanied by seven siblings, and surrounded by horses, real cowboys, and the occasional rattlesnake. I’ve always been drawn to helping others, a trait that began, to my mother’s horror, with bringing home swallow chicks stricken from their nests. I’ve worked as a journalist, lay minister, and infant massage instructor for mothers and babies at risk. Currently, I live with my husband and son in a Carmel cottage old enough to make you sneeze. I love foggy days, chai, and ladybugs. The book I wish I wrote, ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE, by Gabriel García Marquez. Connect with me on Facebook or Twitter.

What inspires you to write?
I came to writing sideways, really. I always thought I’d be an artist. First, I told stories through paintings. It wasn’t until after I discovered metaphysics that I felt a need to play with words. They give me a new slant to exlore spiritual realities, ideas, psychologies, permission to leave the mind-box.

Tell us about your writing process.
I just found out what I am “a panster.” I write flying by the seat of my pants, that is, I am prone to give the reins over to that wild artistic muse (who I suspect is Salvador Dali). Working out a cohesive structure, with character arcs and proper scene breaks, and silly things like that, come later. It’s probably the hardest road to take.

I could have saved myself a lot of grief on my first novel had I checked out Michael Hauge or Fiction University websites. Or if I actually followed the directions given in John Truby’s THE ANATOMY OF A STORY, or Blake Snyder’s SAVE THE CAT. Or my first Creative Writing teacher, Ed Norris. But no. I had to do it my way. Art first. Logic later. Like life. I should have listened to Iain Banks when he said: “The trouble with writing fiction is that it has to make sense . . . whereas real life doesn’t.”

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I often feel as if I’m eavesdropping on some, poor unsuspecting soul on the other side of the world when I’m writing. The characters feel that real to me. It’s as if over time I slip into their skin. No, I don’t talk with them because I am them. Ha!

What advice would you give other writers?
If you’re in a hurry to be published, which I was at first, beware. You don’t want to pick a peach before it’s ripe. A good book takes time, re-examination, and more time. The problem and the stakes must be right up front and center, and they must be compelling. The plot needs adept pacing. And, of course you know the writing must be polished. Every extraneous word, phrase, passage, must go. Every time your reader asks a question, re-visit your passage. Writers need dialogue with trusted readers. Be willing to listen. Sometimes be willing to ignore. But mostly listen. Ask yourself what you want to give to your readers, and let that idea ripen with the writing. Above all–approach your work playfully and be willing to be surprised!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I finished my upcoming novel, I decided to publish without an agent. Over the course of a year, I was offered three contracts, none of which met the industry standards given in the SCBWI Manual for Writers. Since I’m not computer-savvy, and know little about self-publishing, I was reluctant to forge ahead on my own, not knowing how to gauge the wide range of costs and services offered to writers.

Around that time, I discovered award-winning Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing, Inc. in Deadwood, Oregon, by researching the origins of one of my favorite books. Publisher Nancy Cleary has been in business since 1998, publishing books traditionally and also pioneering a unique program to assist independent writers. I contacted several of her authors, and they overwhelmingly recommended working with her. After the initial consultation with Cleary, I knew she was exceptional, and I knew that I wanted to go the independent route. For a reasonable fee, she has walked me through the publishing process, taking care of everything from copyright registration, book packaging, creating a publishing imprint, opening an account for international distribution with Ingram, and making the book available on eBooks for every device. She conferred on a marketing plan, promotion and pitching, as well as future avenues of revenue from my book including speaking, private-labeling, licensing, and foreign rights. Cleary directed me on sending advance review copies, literary contests, and more. Her expertise has been absolutely invaluable, her enthusiasm and support, priceless.

Remember that not all publishers are created equal! Research your options. A good literary attorney can give you a professional opinion on a contract in half an hour. We authors get to choose our partners. It’s a big responsibility. We must be thorough, do our homework, and take the time to choose wisely.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It seems daunting to publish right now, given that the latest World-o-meter tally of books published worldwide between January and April of 2015 is: 905,000. That’s more than two sold-out football stadiums a month!
The bad news: it’s harder than ever for new authors to find a traditional publisher.
The good news: authors have never had more power to decide the course of their careers.
I envision a time when publishers and writers will be working more as partners, where the author will keep most of her rights, be a party to editorial/design decisions, and the relationship will be more equitable.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: YA, magical realism, coming of age, visionary, literary, historical fiction, family and relationaships, disability

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Robin Gregory Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Math Bird

About Math Bird:
Math Bird’s stories have been broadcast on BBC Radio 4, Radio Wales, Radio 4 Extra. His work has appeared in number of magazines and anthologies. Recent stories can be found in:

Plan B Mystery Anthology V
Shotgun Honey
Pulp Modern Issue 9
All Due Respect Magazine Issue 7 (coming soon

What inspires you to write?
As cliche as it may sound, I always feel the need to write. This has grown stronger over the years, as I’ve taken my writing more seriously and tried to improve. I’m also inspired by other writers. Reading is a must, but one sentence or an image can trigger a completely different story.

Tell us about your writing process.
I pretty much get an idea and then develop that in my head for a while, let it take root so to speak. As it grows, I let the plot develop. I’ve a good idea of the themes, characters and where the story is going before I start writing, I’ve also envisaged an outline of the ending.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes, but for me it’s more of a subconscious process. They don’t scream out as such, but as they take shape actions or dialogue may change under their subliminal influence.

What advice would you give other writers?
The best advice (and nothing new here) is to read. But for a writer, it’s important to read as a writer as well. Find the writers you like and admire and see how they develop a scene, structure sentences (grammar, rhythm etc.) How they structure paragraphs and move the story forward. How the use dialogue, voice etc. I continually do this, and find what works and doesn’t work for me and use that in my writing.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’ve been published through both publisher and self published. There’s room for both. I love the whole process of self publishing, once the story’s written – there’s the added bonus of further creative pursuits such as formatting, cover design, promotion etc. I would advise to start small and see how it goes. I’m no expert, but there are plenty of people who are and there seems to be so much good advice out there.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think there’s room for both electronic and traditional books. They tend to different needs. But I imagine each will evolve slightly differently. I think fiction, shorts, flash, singles, novels etc are especially suited to our various devices, phones, readers etc., whereas print books will become more specialized perhaps, bounded and elaborate, and provide a very different experience. We’ve already seen it with music – digital downloads and vinyl coexist and provide two very different experiences.

What genres do you write?: Crime, Noir, Hard-boiled, Literary and Pulp

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Link To Math Bird Page On Amazon

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Diane Hall

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About Diane Hall:
I haven’t always thought of myself as a writer, although I have always written, for as long as I can remember. I used to read voraciously as a child, and secretly wrote poetry at night. I LOVED the library and used to go through book series phases. I have some very unusual early memories of books and writing.

I used to love Roald Dahl’s Tales of the Unexpected, and books about spiritualism and strange goings-on. I once wrote an essay in my English class at school, in which I used the word ‘ectoplasm’, much to my English teacher’s surprise! English was one of my favourite subjects at school. English, French and Drama. I later went on to study drama and then became a drama teacher. I fell in love with plays immediately, and still remember the first time I read Shakespeare. It woke me up, and made me realise how powerful language is!

As a singer and musician, I used to write a lot of songs, and after a while I suppose I realised I wanted to say much more than the usual three minutes would allow. Then, as I began to meditate and to listen more, inside, to the point where I was able to access other dimensions, it was a bit like taking dictation… sometimes from the characters themselves, and sometimes from my guides and angels. The craft comes with the fiction writing, when I’m left alone to write the more human side of the story and allow imagination and ancient memory to fill in the gaps.

What inspires you to write?
So many things inspire me. Hearing or feeling the little inner nudges and inspirations from my guides and spiritual teachers and wanting to share their messages of love and inspiration. Wanting to change the world and see people happy. Wanting to inspire people and remind them of Heaven. Wanting people to understand that they are precious, beautiful and eternal and that life continues after physical death. Wanting to give hope, wanting to imagine and create Utopia, at least in my mind – wanting to show how it might happen. Wanting to just enjoy myself: spread my mind out and have a good old laugh at the human condition. Wanting to have people laughing with me, wanting to create and inhabit a range of preferred realities, wanting to stay sane in this 3D body, and wanting to describe the most exquisite gorgeousness and the most absurd contradictions I’ve seen in myself and my fellow humans, as we strive to be fully human and aspire to be so much more than that.

I think we all essentially want to be more loving, and it’s really always, ultimately, love that inspires me to write. Hope that doesn’t sound corny!

Tell us about your writing process.
With novels, it’s usually seat of pants, then tidy up later. In other words, I start off with a big old messy rough draft that emerges over the course of a week or two, and then takes a few revisions to perfect, but then, the perfecting could go on forever, and have to force myself to let go.

When it’s something purely inspired or purely channelled, it tends to just come through me, more or less as a finished piece, with maybe some typing errors here and there. Crafting a novel requires more involvement on my part, but it’s so much fun!!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Absolutely!! I mostly listen, ask them to speak louder, and occasionally say “Really!!! Are you sure??””

What advice would you give other writers?
I don’t know that I’m in a position to give advice. I still feel very much at the beginning of my journey, even though it’s my second attempt at self publishing, however, from a creative point of view, I’d say, just do it, whenever you’re called to it. Write what you love and say what you really need to say to the world. Don’t allow yourself to be boxed in by categories or any other external machinations. Write from your heart, from your gut. Write what YOU want to write, and listen out for inspiration as you go.

Your imagination is a gateway to other worlds. Trust it and try not to think about what would be the sensible thing to write, depending on the whims of the market. Never be sensible!! Writing is a place to go to dream and be idiotic, when there’s nowhere else left. Machines can’t write books or songs. You are a magical being with an incredible gift! Make a start and keep going, no matter what.

Tell the story you have to tell, the way you have to tell it. Write the book you want to read. Try to keep your logical mind out of the way as much as possible, and just let it come through you. Tell the story and amuse yourself! Sometimes, I sit laughing my head off when I’m writing my comedies. I don’t care how mad that is!!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to self-publish because I just needed to have people read what I was writing, right now!!! I got tired of not connecting with people, tired of rejections, and of the time it took to wait for those rejections to happen! Life was passing me by!! So I decided to get serious about self-publishing again.

I would advise new authors to explore the vast range of self-publishing resources available out there. There are tons of books, and some great youtube videos, podcasts, and other platforms that will support not only the huge learning curve of book marketing, but also your journey as a writer.

It’s a very different space now, out there in self-publishing land, both ideologically (in terms of the public’s perception of a self-pub book) and in terms of the possibilities for reaching people. It’s probably still possible to get better exposure through a major publisher, and maybe the best option is to do a bit of both if possible, but what I love about self-publishing is the immediacy of contact with an audience. That’s probably what most artists really want anyway – to have a voice, and to share a message, and in those terms, at least, I think the outlook for indie artists, across all creative fields, is looking better than ever now.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the future looks great! From the writer’s point of view, reading seems to be more popular than ever, and people who love books will always love books, and will always want to find more great stories and good information. I can also see how the internet is introducing a new generation of readers to a wider world of books.

As a reader, there’s so much more choice now, in terms of all the new writing talent that’s emerging, and the easy book access that comes with ebooks, ereaders, and all these great book offers and giveaways.

Again, from the writer’s perspective: if you’re a storyteller, you’ll probably always find a way to tell stories, and if you’re a human, you’ll probably always want to read them, or digest them in some form. So I feel very excited about it the future. More writers, more choices, more books! More opportunities to write, express ourselves and share our stories!

What genres do you write?: Spiritual fiction, spiritual non-fiction, romantic comedy, paranormal romance, magical realism, mind body spirit, inspired and channelled books

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print

Website(s)
Diane Hall Home Page Link
Link To Diane Hall Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Vasil Pujovski

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About Vasil Pujovski:
Hello everyone. I am Vasil Pujovski, a young author that loves cooking and healthy lifestyle. I have been writing since I was a kid and I will continue to do so. I hope you like my books!

What inspires you to write?
Healthy lifestyle and cooking. I want to help everyone!

Tell us about your writing process.
I usually write in my house on my laptop. I get inspired from nature because my house is closely to the mountains.

What advice would you give other writers?
Continue writing and never give up!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
YouTube videos and blogs

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It will be electronic, that is for sure. I don’t know if that is a good or a bad thing…

What genres do you write?: CookBooks, Fiction, Nonfiction

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To Vasil Pujovski Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Instagram

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Joe DiBuduo

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About Joe DiBuduo:
I write fiction and non fiction. I like to put a twist into my fictional stories. I’ve had my stories and prose published in anthologies and online> I have one non fiction book and one novel published along with a book of poetry and some short stories.

What inspires you to write?
I wrote my first story to entertain my daughter and found I had little knowledge on the subject so I had to research it. Doing research thrilled me and I realized if I became a writer, I’d have a reason and motivation to do research. I try to make any fiction I write close to reality by doing this research. With the internet it’s so much easier than in the pre-internet days.

Tell us about your writing process.
I get an idea or a prompt and began to write.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I always base my character’s actions on what I’d do in their situation.

What advice would you give other writers?
Don’t write for money. Do it for fun.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self published my first non fiction book. I have a novel published by a friend who is a publisher and I have a memoir coming out that will be published by a traditional publisher.
I’d rather self publish because I keep control. Once you sign a contract with a publisher, they basically own your book and can change what they want.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the industry will go through so many changes that I can’t predict what will happen. I can only guess.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Paranormal fiction.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print, Audiobook

Website(s)
Joe DiBuduo Home Page Link
Link To Joe DiBuduo Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Social Media
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Aubrey Cara

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About Aubrey Cara:
Aubrey Cara likes it sweet n’ dirty—romance that is. She adores writing about kinky characters finding their one true naughty soul mate to love, cherish, and get freaky with. Aubrey resides of the U.S. coast with her wonderful husband, superhero kid, two hand-me-down dogs, and a fish that has survived against all odds.

What inspires you to write?
I’m inspired by life and fiction all around me. I love reading, but I also love hearing about peoples lives, their struggles, their triumphs, the things that turn them on, and those funny, stupid everyday embarrassing things that happen to them. When I read a story or when I see, even a stranger on the street, I have a drive to want to know more. My mind automatically starts bubbling with ideas and stories.

Tell us about your writing process.
When it comes to starting a book I’m a pantster. I’ll have notes everywhere, from the notebook next to my bed, to scraps of paper in my purse, to the notepad on my phone. Anything that comes to my mind for a particular story, or an insight into the plot or character development goes into those notes. From there I write. I often do a very loose outline, hand written in a notebook, but honestly it usually goes right out the window once I get into the story. My characters have a habit of taking over and telling me what’s going to happen. I still like having it as a guide if the story veers too far off track.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
The further I get into the story the more I get to know my characters. They really take on a life of their own. I know what kind of food they like, what’s in their closet, what kind of soap they use, their inner most hopes, dreams, and disappointments. I’m not sure if they talk to me, as much dictate how things play out. I’ll want to go one direction, but the story will stall out until I get on board with how they want it to go.

If readers think they are crazy for talking about fictional characters like they’re real people, then they can imagine how nuts we authors feel. We’re getting the live feed from fictional characters, around the clock.

What advice would you give other writers?
I’ve always loved to write. Since I was around seven, I would fill journals with young angst and made up stories. Writing is some of the best therapy there is. You can hate it as much as you love it. It can pull you apart, and put you back together. No matter what you write.

Write crap, or write something brilliant. It doesn’t matter. Turn off the inner critic, and just write. And know that for every head to desk moment, there is a spectacular fist in the air moment, if you just keep going.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I published my first book, I went off the beaten path and decided against indie or a big publisher. It was a hard decision. There is security in going with a well known publisher with its own audience. There is also a very nice freedom in going indie and having all the rights to your books. Indie can also be daunting because it’s all on you. I could have gone either way. Instead, I went with a very new publisher who presented me with an awesome contract, and the ability to make my own choices. It was the right fit for me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think indie books are going to continue to rise, but publishing houses are going to continue to be important. I love publishing houses and think there will always be us authors who love and appreciate the things they do. One of the things we should be watching is Kindle Scout. If you’ve never heard of it, look it up. I find it fascinating, yet a tad worrisome that Amazon is becoming a full fledged publisher.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Erotic Romance

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Aubrey Cara Home Page Link
Link To Aubrey Cara Page On Amazon

Social Media
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Susanne Blumer

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About Susanne Blumer:
Susanne Blumer lives on Huckleberry Farm in Upstate South Carolina with her husband and two children. A former model and city girl, Susanne became an accidental farm girl and fell in love with her new life. Her adventures on the farm are the inspiration for many of her books. As Susanne puts it, “Having a farm is like a story. Sometimes it’s a comic book. Sometimes it’s a horror story. But mostly it’s a fairy tale.”

In short order, Susanne became a chicken breeder, goat wrangler, shepherdess, home school mom, donkey whisperer and fence repairer. She has delivered stubborn lambs, ran from determined cows, and everyone at the post office calls her the Crazy Chicken Lady due to the number of chicks she has shipped and received.

In addition to chickens, the farm is home to cows, donkeys, guineas, ducks, cats, Barbados sheep, miniature Babydoll sheep, three Great Pyrenees and a pet goose named Walker.

Susanne is the author of the best-selling Pip! Zip! Hatch! Love! and Wooly Meets The Chickens: Book 1 of the Huckleberry Farm series. She is also the author of the upcoming Piper Periwinkle™ books.

What inspires you to write?
Having a farm and raising animals leads to a lot of funny and sometimes sad situations. My friends would always say, “You need to write a book about that!” So I am. My first books were inspired by the animals I care for and love and by the beauty that I get to wake up to every morning. And I just enjoy writing. Going from an idea to an actual story is an amazing process.

Tell us about your writing process.
My writing process primarily involves sitting in a rocking chair on my front porch with a hot cup of tea and a pad and pencil. It is quiet there, and I can listen to the animals going about their daily lives. I have found I am much more productive physically writing rather than using a keyboard. And I don’t have the distractions that come with sitting at my computer!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I like to let my characters live in my head for a little while before I put them on paper. It’s easier to get to know them that way. I put them in situations in my mind and see how they react and what they do. Then I start writing.

What advice would you give other writers?
The number one piece of advice I have is to start writing. Don’t just think about writing. Do it. And see what comes out! Look around you and find a person or situation that could be the basis of a story. Even a very small idea at first can become an amazing story. But you have to write it down! Also, keep a little notebook with you and jot down any ideas or dialogue that come to you. So many times a great idea would come to me, and I didn’t immediately write it down. And then it disappeared! Now I take notes.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I did a lot of research on traditional publishing and self-publishing. There are pros and cons to both, but in the end, I decided to self-publish and started my own publishing imprint. I have more control over the whole process, and it is a lot faster! I can write whatever I want. I love the flexibility of self-publishing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I am excited about the future of publishing! I’m still in love with actual physical books and always will be, but I am starting to enjoy reading books on my IPad. Readers now have instant access to so many more books, and those books are much more affordable. That benefits both authors and readers. It’s also much easier for authors to publish their works now. I have discovered some fabulous self-published authors that I might never have found a few years ago.

What do you use?:

What genres do you write?: Children’s Books, Nonfiction, Middle Reader

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print

Website(s)
Susanne Blumer Home Page Link
Link To Susanne Blumer Page On Amazon

Social Media
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.

Interview with Author – Inna Rothmann

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About Inna Rothmann:
I have worked in various fields- from language arts teaching to financial project management, however I always enjoyed writing. It took me almost 10 years to become a professional writer though, when in-between my jobs a few years ago I was looking at part-time positions that would give me a decent living while allowing to stay at home most of the time. Freelance writing was my first choice and after a first short writing project, which I did almost for free just to get good recommendations, I started getting more offers. After a successful writing year, I realized it would be great to write something of my own. That’s how my first short book was born. Currently I live in Dubai and am working on Dubai residence guide.

What inspires you to write?
Big cities with their noise and buzz and people of all sorts. Yes, people with their complex or often simple inner world is what fascinates me. I love pretentiousness of urban citizens who often define themselves by what they wear/drive/listen to. People of today are so diverse and at the same time so oversimplistic it is fascinating. I love listening to people talk on a bus, in a cafe, in the elevator, on the street and these short out-of-context conversations (or, often, monologues) are the most wonderful insights into the modern humanity one can get.

Tell us about your writing process.
There are these moments between seconds when suddenly everything becomes so clear that you can’t believe it ever could be otherwise. The hours of procrastination disappear and you manage to do everything in a matter of minutes. Some people call it inspiration; I call it returning to your original self. My apologies if it seems vague and snobbish, but it more or less describes my writing style.

What advice would you give other writers?
Just do it. Whatever has been holding you is in your head, so leave out your fears of failure and write.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I published my first book to check how things really work and what is needed to publish a book, that’s why I did everything myself- from formatting to cover creation. It has been a great experience and I recommend everyone who wishes to become a published author to go through this, it will teach you patience and will make you really think carefully about your every step.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I see the shift from self-publishing back to the traditional methods. Everyone got a voice now, and it’s becoming too much. It is not easy to stand out among thousands of other self-published authors and I think the trend of self-publishing will slowly decline with more professional services being more valued.

What genres do you write?: non-fiction, self-help, fashion, lifestyle

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website
Link To Inna Rothmann Page On Amazon

Social Media
LinkedIn

All information in this post is presented “as is” supplied by the author. We don’t edit, to allow you, the reader, to hear the author in their own voice.