Interview with Author – C.D. Verhoff

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About C.D. Verhoff:
C. D. Verhoff grew up in Indiana, the fourth of five sisters, and currently lives in rural Ohio with her husband and two children. In real life, she goes by her middle name, Deanna. Her resume includes retail, teaching, medical lab processor, the contemplative life, insurance and finance. Authors like Piers Anthony, Issac Asimov, Terry Brooks, Dean Koontz, Madeleine L’Engle, Anne McCaffrey and J.R.R. Tolkien were early influences, sparking a lifelong love of fantasy and science fiction. She says that writing fiction ranks somewhere between eating warm chocolate chip cookies and riding the Millennium roller coaster at Cedar Point. Her interests include weird trivia, landscaping, dogs, dragons, history, The Walking Dead, coffee and chocolate.

What inspires you to write?
Writing fiction is fun because it allows me to control the universe and everyone in it. Returning to reality where I’m just an ordinary human and not a god is always a letdown

Tell us about your writing process.
My writing process varies from book to book. I usually start out with an idea. It pings around in my head for days, or months, or years before I commit it to my handy dandy spiral notebook. By hand, I write out a one or two page outline, establishing the major elements of the story: point of view, characters, plot, conflict and setting. Then I sit down at the computer and drink gallons of coffee. If I didn’t distract myself with Candy Crush, Youtube and Netflix I’d be a more prolific author. Anyway, my final manuscript seldom resembles the original outline. So why do I bother?

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t listen to my characters or talk to them, but I often put myself in their shoes. I’ll say their dialogue out loud or try to imagine the physical sensations they might be experiencing in a scene.

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep the writing in perspective. Odds are, you’ll never get rich off of it, so don’t quit your day job. Writing can become all-absorbing if you’re not careful. Don’t let it come between you and your healthy. Don’t let it come between you and your loved ones.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I set out to find a traditional publisher, but the gatekeepers wouldn’t let me in. Now, imagine my middle finger going straight up into the air. So I turned to self-publishing. It’s been an enlightening journey and a lot more work than expected, but I’m super grateful for the technology that has allowed me to pursue my dreams. Thank you Amazon, Smashwords and Draft2Digital! I advise new authors to explore all of their publishing options.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think the traditional and self-published realms will learn to peacefully co-exist. Physical books and digital readers are both here to stay. However, it will be even harder for authors to be able to support themselves on their writing alone. There’s just so many books out there and the number grows everyday. When the supply of books exceeds the number of people that want to read them, it’s inevitable.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: I write Fantasy, Christian Fantasy and Science Fiction.

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
C.D. Verhoff Home Page Link
Link To C.D. Verhoff Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – La Marchesa

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About La Marchesa:
A little bit about Marchesa. (very little) She lives in Las Vegas where the temp once hit 125. She likes to think her stories are as hot as Las Vegas. She’s Italian and Greek, (born in Italy) just like her horny heroines and She’s #@*&# years old. Her great grand aunt was a marchesa in Italy, hence she borrowed her title.

What inspires you to write?
I’m a natural Story Teller with a wild imagination so writing is my outlet

Tell us about your writing process.
Like many authors I start with an idea or photograph and extemporaneously wing it. I can’t imagine laying the whole story out and then following it. How boring:)

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Can’t say that I do, but then again I’m the Mistress and the characters are my submissives.

What advice would you give other writers?
It’s a very tough racket right now. Be prepared to sacrifice.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I published my first book, a novella called TWO MINUTE ORGASM, five years ago with New Dawning Bookfair and liked them so I keep publishing with them. I now have ten books with them that most readers seem to appreciate and love. Of course there are those who abhor my writing and claim I’m doomed for HELL. Do I seem worried?

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Between internet piracy & ebook monopoly, I think authors with have to band together. UNION? Why not, if it covers our butts. There are two existing writers unions, BTW.

What genres do you write?: Erotic, Very Erotic, Super Erotic, Blow your mind Erotic

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Link To La Marchesa Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Interview with Author – Oleg Ilin

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About Oleg Ilin:
Oleg Ilin is a digital marketing professional specializing in various forms of organic traffic and lead generation including SEO, social media marketing and mobile marketing. He is a social media influencer with many thousands of followers and fans on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social networks.

What inspires you to write?
I am a social media influencer with many thousands of followers and fans. Many clients ask me the same questions about social media marketing. My guess is that the majority of people who tries to figure out how to successfully use social media for business have the same questions. So by writing the books with the answers I am hoping to help people en mass.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am an outliner, first I need to figure out what questions will be covered, how many chapters will be in the book, what are the main points of each chapter, etc.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you have a writers block in one chapter, switch to another one then come back.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My book is self-published. Kindle for now, but i will self-publish the paper version of the book too. Another book is coming soon.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Future of publishing is in digital publishing

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Nonfiction, business

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Oleg Ilin Home Page Link
Link To Oleg Ilin Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Emerald O’Brien

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About Emerald O’Brien:
Emerald O’Brien is a Canadian writer who grew up just east of Toronto, Ontario. Emerald studied Television Broadcasting and Communications Media, and graduated from the program at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario. She loves writing new adult mystery novels that include suspense, thrills, and twists. Expect mystery, Suspect everyone.

When she is not reading or writing, Emerald can be found with family and friends. Watching movies with her husband and their two beagles is one of her favourite ways to spend an evening at home.

What inspires you to write?
Stories that I hear or read inspire me to write and tell my own.

Tell us about your writing process.
After I get my initial idea, I write it down, as I would a synopsis. I flesh out the story chapter by chapter as long as it feels natural. Sometimes I plot the ending, while most times, I know it will change and I don’t bother. As I write, I either stick to the plot, or go off on a tangent that the story or characters take me on. I try to stay true to that.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
In my mind, the story plays like a movie. While I don’t interact with my characters, I can hear the voice they speak in, and the tone they use.

What advice would you give other writers?
I would tell other writers who love to write that they should decide what their goal is. Write for fun/as a hobby? Freelance writing for articles? Publish fiction or non-fiction? Once you have a goal, you can map how to get there. In the meantime– write.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I researched traditional and self-publishing. I decided self-publishing was a good way for me to stay in control of my creative process and the final product once it was published. I knew it would be a challenge, but I made my choice based on the ability to control my own path.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’s easier to predict the immediate future of publishing, and almost impossible to predict the long-term changes that will occur. I think those who keep themselves informed and change with it will have a positive future.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Mystery, New Adult, Suspense, Thriller

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Emerald O’Brien Home Page Link
Link To Emerald O’Brien Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Sean Austin

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About Sean Austin:
Sean Austin (aka Hart Getzen) is a father of avid gamers as well as a writer and producer of simulation, television, location based entertainment and gaming entertainment for companies such as IMAX, 20th Century Fox, Hitachi and Universal Studios. Using ECHO’s Revenge as a springboard, Getzen guest lectures on writing and STEM career development at middle-grade and high schools. The author also lectures on design and production of Location Based Entertainment at universities such as the Rhode Island School of Design.

“The ECHO’s Revenge series provokes gamers to consider the ethics of Artificial Intelligence and its impact on both designing and playing games – what happens when a group of people work together to create a game, and imbue it not only with its own intelligence, but with their own spirit? What are the political and interpersonal dynamics of that team enterprise, and what challenges may game designers face when their AI evolves in an unanticipated direction?”

What inspires you to write?
I produced simulations (like the Transformers ride at Universal Studios Parks) and other high-tech entertainment for many years and saw how things could go wrong with technology-for example, we found that we could not only excite and entertain people in motion simulators, but could make them really sad, happy, wildly hysterical (laughing totally out of control ) or even cause them to hiccup for 24 hours. These were emotions and responses that we discovered, but did not use in the shows, for various reasons. We accidentally found them through human error. I also had a boss who often said “Technology will give us the answers,” and “The technology will show us the way,” which I found was a huge mistake. Technology is a tool. Our intelligence and ethics must guide us and our new technologies. Our ethics and understanding of artificial intelligence must grow and evolve continuously to enable us to manage the new technologies we invent. There are many other reasons I wrote the book, among them wanting to show how codes can help us get through hard times, like what Claire talks about in the focus group. I also wanted to show how brothers (or sisters) can help each other get through tough times with difficult parents.

Tell us about your writing process.
I am definitely an outliner to to cover all the points in the novel I need to address. From there I write a very very rough draft that I re read and pass on to friends and family to get their criticism. Then keep going by writing different sections that need work and off to my copy editor and editor.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
It’s actually interesting because I, Sean Austin, am actually a character in the ECHO;’s Revenge series. I also continue the investigation for ECHO-7 on my website to include a external source for readers. So when writing with Sean in mind, I have to make sure I capture his character traits and emotions even if that someones involve speaking out loud.

What advice would you give other writers?
Keep on writing. Don’t get discouraged after releasing one novel and it not skyrocketing to the top of the best sellers list. You have to gradually and continually build your base and keep writing novels. Spread the royalties between numerous novels instead of hitting the jackpot with a single novel. Also, know who you are writing for!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I went with the independent publisher route because not only did I want to create realism within the AAA Reality Games company, but I also wanted to explore outside alternatives to a traditional publisher. I just don’t believe traditional publishers have the motivation and enthusiasm for an author’s work outside of dollar signs in their eyes.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I don’t think it will be going anywhere soon, electronic and print copies will always be fighting to see which is better. I run into people more and more who prefer a print copy to an e-device. On top of that I write for young adults and teens. That market is not into the idea of e-devices yet. Holding my breath…

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Thrillers, Acion Adventure, Video Game

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Sean Austin Home Page Link
Link To Sean Austin Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Kelly Love

About Kelly Love:
Kelly Love wrote her romance novel at age 20 when she discovered that writing about girls was way easier than actually talking to them. Since then, her flirting skills haven’t improved, but she likes to think her storytelling ability has!
Though she’ll forever be a New York girl at heart, she now lives in sunny San Francisco. If she’s not working on her latest sexy story, you can find her reading, watching reality television, or indulging in her unhealthy addiction to pop concerts.

What inspires you to write?
It’s definitely knowing that all the ideas in my head can be shared, appreciated and enjoyed by other people! There’s no other feeling like it! Also writing has always been a part of my life ever since I was a child growing up. It all started with journaling and has always been my creative outlet!

Tell us about your writing process.
I use a mind map and throw all my ideas out there. Then I take a second sweep and begin organizing those ideas. Next step is to talk to other authors and friends, which usually lead to more interesting plots. Lastly, coming up with a final outline.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I decided to self publish because of the huge process required to even get noticed by a publisher, let alone get chosen! Self publishing gives me a lot of control over what I write, how it’s marketed and allows me to interact with my readers more intimately.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
It’s going to shift toward a self publishing model because the barriers to entry are lower. In addition to independent authors showing up on Amazon’s kindle market more, I can see publishing houses shifting their focus on ebooks and taking care of the marketing aspects

What genres do you write?: Lesbian Romance

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Kelly Love Home Page Link
Link To Kelly Love Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook

Interview with Author – William Wright

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About William Wright:
A resident of Colorado Springs, William “Bill” Wright, MD earned his medical degree at the University of Michigan. After working as an ear surgeon for thirty years, Bill spent eight years practicing correctional medicine with the Colorado Department of Corrections. He has published over fifty medical journal articles. Maximum Insecurity is the light-hearted adventure of Wright’s career practicing medicine in a supermax correctional facility.

A commercial artist and private pilot, Bill has three black belts and is a certified instructor of Aikido and Tae Kwan Do. He is married, with four children and six grandchildren.

What inspires you to write?
Working in a maximum-security prison was the weirdest thing I’d ever done. I started a journal, and it got completely out of hand. I had no idea about the things people really do and say to survive in a prison environment, so witnessing it firsthand was an irresistible experience I had to share.

Tell us about your writing process.
I always wanted to be an outliner, but I just can’t do it. Every time I start an outline I start writing about the things I’m trying to outline. I seem to assemble my books like a jigsaw, writing on one subject at a time and assembling them later. I’m sure it causes me more grief than if I was more organized, but it works.

What advice would you give other writers?
Just write. There’s no substitute for putting words on paper (or a screen). Even if you’ve got nothing to say, just start writing about something and the blocks fall away. Don’t worry if its good or not. I’ve thrown away lots more words than I’ve published.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I started with pitch sessions at writing conferences and sending query letters to agents. It took loads of time away from writing what I wanted to write. Rejection letters from people who had glanced at a paragraph of my work didn’t sit well. Too much effort for no results.
When self-publishing came into quasi-mainstream I looked at the royalty rates. 70% versus a fraction of 15% for traditional publishing. In traditional publishing authors have about 6 weeks after the book hits the shelves to make it or not. No second chances.
With self-publishing I could take the time to develop a reader base, adjust the price, run promotions, control how my books look from the cover to the typeface, be able to edit or update a book that’s already published, and never have to worry about going hat-in-hand to agents who are too busy to pay attention to a new author.
I have my own writing/publishing business that I can control myself.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Agents will become facilitators of self-publishing authors. Traditional publishing will still trade on the mega-sellers, but they’ll find their darlings from self-published authors who have hit it big independently. Self-publishing is becoming easier and more affordable all the time, and there’s less and less incentive to waste time, effort and money assaulting the closed bastions of traditional publishing.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: Non-fiction. Memoir

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
William Wright Home Page Link

Interview with Author – Dada Vedaprajinananda

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About Dada Vedaprajinananda:
Dada Vedaprajinananda is a monk, meditation and yoga teacher and a singer-songwriter. Originally from New York, he has lectured, performed and taught in more than thirty countries and is currently based in the US. Dada was the founding editor of New Renaissance magazine, and has given lectures at universities in the US, Europe and Asia. As a singer-songwriter, he has issued three CDs of original songs and one CD of children’s music. He is a regular performer at social service venues in Champaign-Urbana, IL where he currently resides. His website is www.dadaveda.com

What inspires you to write?
I want to share my experiences on the spiritual path with a wider public. I have dedicated my entire life towards this goal and writing and publishing is one of the best ways to do this. I can talk to one or two people when I meet them personally, but the printed word can reach many more people for a long time to come.

Tell us about your writing process.
I generally do not use an outline when I write however if you are a beginner it would make sense to write out a few basic ideas and then using that list go on to flesh the ideas out with more writing.

What advice would you give other writers?
Set some time aside for your writing and try to do a little bit each day

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I published with a friend who works with other writers and teacher in my genre. We are a small press somewhere in between self-publishing and an indie publisher.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Electronic and spoken books will be important, but print will still be around for long time to come.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: memoir, spiritual philosophy

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Dada Vedaprajinananda Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Facebook

Interview with Author – Jennifer Barraclough


About Jennifer Barraclough:
I come from England, where I worked as a medical doctor specialising in psycho-oncology. In 2000 I moved with my husband and cats to New Zealand and developed a new career as a Bach flower practitioner, life coach and author. Having published several academic medical books in the past, I recently returned to my childhood passion for writing fiction. The trilogy which began with ‘Carmen’s Roses’ and ‘Blue Moon for Bombers’ has been completed with ‘The Windflower Vibration’, and these books are available individually or as the box set ‘Three Novellas’. My next novel ‘Overdose: a psychiatric tragicomedy’ will be available in 2015. My interests besides writing include choral singing and animal welfare.

What inspires you to write?
Ideas can come from my own life experience past and present, from dreams, sometimes apparently from nowhere. I’ve loved writing ever since I was a small girl – it’s what brings me ‘into the flow’ and is perhaps part of my ‘soul purpose’. But much as I love the actual writing process, it’s ultimately only worthwhile if the results can be read by others and hopefully have some positive impact on their lives.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start with a broad outline of each book, but this frequently changes as the work progresses. I like to write each chapter in a separate file and experiment with changing their sequence. To avoid mistakes in continuity I make a list of my characters’ names and ages, and the timeline of events. I try to find time to write every day, but have to fit around other activities so I’ve never managed to establish a regular routine.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Not exactly, but they do become very real to me and they have minds of their own.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write what you want to write, rather than what you think is going to sell. Ask a few trusted people to review your manuscript before you publish it. Check, check and check again for typos at every stage. Don’t be too sensitive to criticism – not everyone will like your work.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I had traditional publishers for the medical books I wrote in the UK. It was easy to get them accepted because in those days I had a professional reputation in my specialised field of work. But after moving to New Zealand where I was not known, and turning to fiction writing, I realised that my chances of being taken on by an agent or publishing firm were fairly slim. I was keen to get my books ‘out there’ reasonably fast, and excited by the new opportunities offered by platforms such as Smashwords and CreateSpace, so decided to go with self-publishing. I enjoy the freedom and control it provides, and will probably continue as an indie author.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Unpredictable! I expect that the field will continue to be shared between print books and ebooks, and between traditional publishers and indie authors. Ideally I would like to see the recent torrent of self-published titles slowing down, with new ones being fewer in number but higher in quality; and easier ways for authors to market their work and for readers to find the books which interest them.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: mystery, romance, psychological thriller, medical, self help

What formats are your books in?: eBook, Print, Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Jennifer Barraclough Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Alba Arango

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About Alba Arango:
Alba Arango is the author of the Decoders series as well as the JJ Bennett: Junior Spy series. She lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, where she is a high school teacher. She loves coffee and chocolate (especially together…white chocolate mocha is the best!).

What inspires you to write?
I have always loved to write. My happiest moments, as well as the ones that inspire me to keep writing, are when kids tell me they love my stories. Hearing that I am a kid’s favorite author makes me blush and drives me to hurry up and get that next book out!

Tell us about your writing process.
Oh dear. My writing process? I sit on my couch, laptop on my lap, feet up on the coffee table, and write. Most of the time I have no idea where the story is going. In one of my first books, one of the adults came up to my main character and told him, “Your father is missing.” After I typed those words, I just stared at the monitor because I had no idea who took him!

I know other authors are planners. They outline and storyboard and write the ending before the beginning. I so envy them. I’ve tried it, but it just doesn’t work for me. Seeing where the story goes, day to day, is part of the fun for me. Granted, it also means I have to go back and make all kinds of changes when I’m done. In my last book, one character started off as Hans Schmidt in chapter 1 and ended up being Saul Mendoza by the end of the book!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I talk to my characters all the time. My poor computer monitor. I’ve even yelled at characters, telling them what horrible people they are. Sometimes, I ask my characters if they would really say those things. Imagining what the protagonists do on their time off (between books) helps me fully develop their personalities. I know who my characters are because I know what they do, even when they’re not in my books.

What advice would you give other writers?
Don’t give up. I’ve seen so many writers get excited about their story, then they hit a roadblock and just stop writing. No! Keep going. If you can’t figure out the next scene, don’t stop writing until you figure it out. Write a completely different, unrelated scene. Or, write the ending, and go backwards.

Setting goals can also be extremely helpful. If you have a crazy, hectic lifestyle (job, kids, dogs, etc.), then set realistic goals and meet them. Instead of 1000 words a day (which some days is just impossible, then you get frustrated and give up), set a goal of 3000 words a week. That way, if you can’t crank out any writing a couple of days, you can still reach your goal by cramming in some writing on the days you have time. And if you go over your 3000 word goal, treat yourself to something special…like an ice cream sundae. (nothing like a good old-fashioned fattening incentive to get those creative juices flowing)

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I spent several years exploring my options. Big publisher? Small press? Self-publish? Much of the research I did pointed to the reality that whichever avenue I chose to pursue, marketing and promoting my book would fall entirely on me. (Unless you are a big-name author, publishers do not spend the money promoting your book.)

After much research, I decided on the self-publishing route. I would advise all new authors to take the time and explore all their options. Traditional publishing may be a great fit for you.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
So long as there are readers, there will be books. Deep, I know. My personal feelings are that print books will never die. People love the feel of a book in their hands. But, at the same time, to shun digital publishing would be a monumental mistake.

I think in today’s market (and in the future market as well), most readers are like me. They have a Kindle (Nook, Kobo, iBooks, whatever) and they buy print books. I think the key to publishing now and in the future is versatility. All publishers, traditional and self, need to be willing to meet the demands of all markets, digital and print.

On a side note, as you go to purchase your print books, don’t forget about indie bookstores. We just got a new one in Las Vegas called The Writer’s Block and it is fabulous. Buying from indie booksellers is one way to support the publishing industry as well as small businesses at the same time.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: middle grade fiction, mystery, detective, spies, action adventure

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Alba Arango Home Page Link
Link To Alba Arango Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on Smashwords

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

Interview with Author – Julien Ayotte

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About Julien Ayotte:
Julien Ayotte is no stranger to writing, although Flower of Heaven is his debut novel. He has since published the sequel, Dangerous Bloodlines. In his long career in the corporate and legal worlds, he has authored countless articles in business and legal journals. Ayotte holds a BS, MBA, and PhD, all in finance and business. He was also an adjunct professor of finance and investments in five different graduate school programs in RI and MA. He was a corporate officer of Textron Inc. and an executive director at two prominent law firms in the area for the last fourteen years of his career. He lives in Cumberland, RI with his wife, Pauline. They have three grown children.

What inspires you to write?
The ability to tell a good story from beginning to end is very rewarding to me. I have always frustrated people by knowing how stories end. I love it when readers tell me how much they have enjoyed my books. That makes me want to write more.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have trouble following an outline for the whole story, but it is helpful to keep track of the dates in the book so as not to sound foolish writing about wrong time periods. But the story is done primarily spontaneously on a day by day basis. It seems to all fall into place by the time the ending occurs.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Of course I talk to my characters. If I’m going to convince readers they are in the characters shoes, it has to be convincing.

What advice would you give other writers?
If your first book doesn’t fare well, keep on writing. Maybe the second or third book will be the one that hits the mark with readers. Just ask John Grisham why A Time to Kill took almost four years before it finally took off.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Rejections by literary agents are all too common. After 125 rejections, I decided to self-publish because I knew my work was good. I don’t begrudge agents for the rejections because they get hundreds of requests a week from unknowns like me. But if you stay at it, and what you write is acclaimed by your readers, in time you will succeed.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Like full service brokers, literary agents will continually face competition from self-published works going forward. they are no longer the only avenue to take.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: mystery, suspense, thrillers, intrigue, romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Julien Ayotte Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

Interview with Author – Linda Crowder

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About Linda Crowder:
Linda grew up in Loveland, Colorado as the sixth of six children. She moved
with her parents to California when she was 16 and spent the next 16 years
of her life in the Bay Area before moving home to Colorado.

Linda devoted 20+ years to nonprofit human services before deciding to
take a new direction in her life. She founded Focus Forward, LLC to do the
things she most enjoys – management consulting for small business owners
and nonprofits and career coaching.

In 2012, Linda realized a life-long dream when she published her first book,
“Life Isn’t Just Luck: Getting from where you are to where you want to be.”
In it, she explores what keeps us from achieving our goals and identifies
strategies to overcome these roadblocks.

In 2013, Linda published her first mystery novel, “Too Cute to Kill.” This was
followed by “Main Street Murder” in 2014 and “Justice for Katie” in 2015.
Linda lives outside Casper, Wyoming with her husband, ten cats and one
incredibly patient dog.

What inspires you to write?
I love to read! I have been reading mysteries since I was doing summer reading programs at my local library as a child. I started with Nancy Drew and worked my way up to my all-time favorite – Agatha Christie. I love writing mysteries because I love creating a puzzle where all the clues are there for the reader, yet the goal is always to have the reader surprised by the revelation.

Tell us about your writing process.
With my first book, Too Cute to Kill, I developed the plot as I went along. I knew somewhat where I wanted to go with it, but when I settled on the outcome I had to go back and re-write sections to make sure the clues were all pointing in the right direction. Now writing my fourth book, I have mapped it out a little better though I still like the spontaneous plot twists that Jake and Emma suggest.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I have quite a bit of dialog with my characters before and during the writing process. I run scenes in my head over and over, working out details and dialog before I ever write a word. In this way, I get to try out interesting bits and see how to weave them into the story. I like my characters and I enjoy seeing what they’re up to.

What advice would you give other writers?
Don’t read your reviews until you develop your voice to the point where you won’t be second-guessing yourself with every negative comment. You’ll never write a book the whole world loves, so write what you love.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I researched publishers and self-publishing options before deciding to self-publish. The “big five” are not falling over themselves to work with unknown authors and small houses seem to still require me to do most of the work to market the books. I also like the freedom to control the content of my books. I write “clean” cozy mysteries and I don’t have any desire to re-work them with the graphic sex and violence some publishers seem to think readers want.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think we’ll continue to see growth in self-publishing and print on demand publishing. I think that a commitment to professionalism will set serious authors apart from the sea of people who just slap something together and call it a book. Readers will continue to be savvy consumers when it comes to the books they choose and this will drive the market.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Cozy Mystery

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Linda Crowder Home Page Link
Link To Linda Crowder Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
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