Interview with Author – Nancy Hill


Author Bio:
Nancy Hill is a writer and photographer living in Portland, Oregon. Her day job, managing the publications and communications dept. in a state agency, feeds the bill collectors. Writing fiction and screenplays feeds the soul. Taking pictures helps lighten the therapy bills. She also does ghostwriting and writes feature articles for various publications.

She has two grown sons, a dog, and a garden of weeds that those obsessed with perfect lawns only wish they had the liberty to embrace.

What inspires you to write?
The need to escape.

Tell us about your writing process.
After a story pops into my head, I live with it for a while – sometimes for a long while, especially if I’m working on something else. I kick around possibilities, see where it might go.

The characters usually become clear before the entire story unfolds. When I think I know where it’s going, I begin writing. I get up every morning at 5:30 and write for at least an hour before I go to work. I set a goal to write three pages a day. If I need a piece of information to proceed, I’m tempted to stop and do some research, but I’m trying to break myself of that habit (it slows things down and I think it’s actually procrastination) by making a note to fill in the missing detail later. Then in the evening after work and walking the dog, I search for the details I needed. I fill them in. I repeat this until I have a first draft.

Then I reread the first draft, hate it, wonder how I could possibly have been deluded enough to think I could write. This usually makes me cry. I swear I’ll give up and never write again. I wallow in misery.

And then to pull myself out of the funk all this crying has done, I reread the draft, figure out what I hate about it, and begin draft 2, convinced that I am now much wiser and can make it work.

Sometimes I can, sometimes I can’t.

But I keep writing. I don’t know how to stop.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I watch my characters. I pay attention to them. I get annoyed when they hide things, especially crucial things that mean I have to rewrite entire scenes or chapters when they finally reveal their secrets to me. Very rude behavior. Yet I always forgive them.

What advice would you give other writers?
Follow your heart, but know it will lead you astray. Trust your intuition, but know it’s fallible. Listen to your peers, but know their advice is not always sage. Never, ever get caught in the trap of comparing your writing or success to other writers, but know that’s inevitable.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After years of getting fiction rejected (I did much better with non-fiction), I decided to self-publish. Unfortunately, my marketing skills are sorely lacking. This is a huge problem with self-publishing.

Marketing is also very time consuming and tedious. I would far rather write new stuff than try to market what I’ve already written.

So self-publishing is probably not the best option for me – although so far, it’s been the only one. Dumb publishers, anyway.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’s wide open. Publishing houses have to be getting mighty nervous now that writers have other avenues and do not have to come begging at their doors.

On the other hand, with all the self-published books, some of them very, very poorly written, it is as difficult for a good writer to make it in the indie world as it is to find a traditional publisher.

I’m not sure how this will all be resolved. I like the ability to read fine books that weren’t right for traditional publishing houses, but I am disheartened by all the poorly written books readers have to sift through to try to find the golden ring in the seemingly endless miles of sand.

I would like to see more publishing houses take on more books so more good writers had the opportunity to get published in a traditional way. But the more self-publishing takes off, the less likely that will be.

It’s worrisome.

What do you use?
Ghostwriter, Co-writer, Professional Editor

What genres do you write?
Coming of age; children’s books; short story collections.

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Author Home Page Link
Link To Author Page On Amazon

Interview with Author – Stacy Navarro

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Author Bio:
Stacy Navarro has been passionate about writing for more than twenty years. After being a stay-at-home mom for 17 years, she finally shook the dust bunnies off her spiral notebooks and began to write seriously. Her dreams became a reality when she won Crossbook’s Writing Contest in 2013 with the manuscript for her book, ‘Hand Over Your Heart’.

Through her characters, Stacy strives to celebrate the fun in everyday life, her faith in the Lord, and how struggles can transform into blessings.

She currently lives in Southern California where she is raising four children with her husband, Roberto.

What inspires you to write?
My first novel actually began as a challenge to my teenage daughters who hate to read…if I wrote a book they promised to read it. Imagine the excitement that I felt when they got to read the first half and started hounding me to write because they couldn’t wait to see what would happen next. I really want my characters to be people I’m proud for my kids to look up to.
Being an avid reader myself, the drive to give someone else that same thrill I get from reading a good book fills me. It’s my rush.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m a spiral notebook girl. I can carry them everywhere and scribble ideas whenever they hit me. Of course, once I’ve got several scene ideas piled up, I get everything organized on my laptop while I’m sitting on my patio.
Jogging on my dirt road is my biggest momentum started. There’s something about that solitary environment that gets my characters talking and juices flowing.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters totally argue their cases to me. Sometimes when I get an idea for a conversation between characters I think, “I wouldn’t say that.’ They answer back, “Yeah, but I would.”
When it’s been awhile since I’ve written I miss them. It’s like they’re friends. Writing is very personal.

What advice would you give other writers?
Push yourself, but have fun! Don’t always write things to turn out just the way everyone expects. As hard as it is, try not to let people’s opinions direct your writing. (Professional guidance is always helpful. I’m not saying to be arrogant and not seek advice of experienced people. I’m talking about not being afraid of being original and staying true to your beliefs.)

How did you decide how to publish your books?
After being a stay-at-home mom for 17 years, it looked like I was going to need to enter the work force. My husband knew writing was my passion and wanted my to get to live my dream. So, we self-published my first book, Singlehanded. A few months later I entered the manuscript to my second book, ‘Hand Over Your Heart’, in Crossbook’s Writing Contest. Crazily, I won!!! So, they published my second book for me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
An avid reader and owner of a kindle myself, I’m fully aware of how popular ebooks are. I definitely see technology continuing to play a huge roll in the publishing world.
Having said that, I just can’t bear the thought of the printed book being done away with…my three overflowing bookshelves can testify that. There’s no replacing the smell of the pages and the rush I get when I see there are only a few pages left.

What do you use?
Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?
young adult, fiction, romance

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Stacy Navarro Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6625596.Stacy_Navarro
https://www.facebook.com/StacyNavarro.author

Interview with Author – Laura Ward @laurarosnerward

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Author Bio:
Laura Ward lives in Maryland with her loud and very loving three children and husband. She married her college sweetheart and is endlessly grateful for the support he has given her through all their years together, and especially toward her goal of writing books. When not changing diapers, driving to lacrosse practice, or checking spelling homework, Laura is writing or reading romance novels.

What inspires you to write?
I’ve always daydreamed love stories, but now I’m inspired to write to show my children they should always follow their dreams.

Tell us about your writing process.
I get a loose outline in my head and then go with it. Once I get a skeletal story structure on paper, I go back and fill in richer scenes.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Absolutely- and almost always in the shower.

What advice would you give other writers?
Read. All the time.
Write for at least thirty minutes every day. Once you really get into the story, you won’t be able to stop.
Find friends to read and critique for you. This is an invaluable way to grow as a writer.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I knew the romance genre was pretty saturated, so I decided to self publish. I’m new to this, so I don’t have too much advice right now.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I’d like to think it will follow the market and be welcoming to self publishers and traditional publishers alike.

What do you use?
Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
New Adult, Romance

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Laura Ward Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8328712.Laura_Ward
http://www.facebook.com/LauraWardAuthor
http://twitter.com/laurarosnerward

Interview with Author – Pamela Murrey

Author Bio:
Pamela Murrey was born and raised in Virginia but has lived in Washington state for over 20 years now. She lives with four cats whom she does not own but adores. They are the main reason she keeps her day job. They also inspire her creative side.

What inspires you to write?
I enjoy sharing experiences and feelings on paper. I like share specialized knowledge, such as crafting skills.

Tell us about your writing process.
I use ywriter5 software, which is free and great to organize my writing. It allows for an outline and much more. Many of my characters start with bare bones and develop over the course of the story. By the end of the book they are full fledged imaginary characters.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t listen to or talk to my characters but they dominate my thoughts quite a bit while I’m writing their stories. I picture them, place them and consider their actions.

What advice would you give other writers?
Think about what you want to write and do it. Be sure to take the time to edit your writing. Read it, write it, listen to it being read aloud so you can hear what you wrote. Put it though grammar checkers and spell checks.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I wanted to self-publish because I wanted to experience the full process of a book from random thoughts to sales. It can be overwhelming and if you are worried about the experience you might want to compare the two processes side by side.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Books will always have a future – both self publishing and old fashioned publishers. I can’t imagine a world without new and old books. Even with my e-readers I have a whole room designated as a library for books. There will possibly be some changes in the world of publishing. But that’s not a bad thing.

What genres do you write?
crafts, fiction, science fiction

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Pamela Murrey Home Page Link
Link To Pamela Murrey Page On Amazon

Interview with Author – J. F. Hussey

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Author Bio:
In his brief sojourn on this mortal coil, J. F. Hussey has sailed the Caribbean, skied the Andes, sipped Champagne in Reims, swum with sharks, beaten Army, earned a Ph.D. and fathered multitudes. A man of letters and changer of diapers, he lives in suburban Maryland with his five children, where he rises well before the sun to pound – lovingly – on his keyboard before the chaos that is daylight ensues.
His writing reflects his wide interests and his abiding concern for the way modern life can crush the joie out of any vivre, and celebrates the heroic lengths to which some will go to reclaim their birthright to happiness.

What inspires you to write?
For me, writing in a need grown out of years of practice. After a dozen years in academia I transitioned to a civil service position where I also earn my bread writing – just reports, briefs, etc. instead of scholarly prose. It was quite natural, then, for me to seek a more lively outlet. Taking up fiction was far more appealing than picking up any of the academic work I had put down.

Tell us about your writing process.
Yes, I’m a planner. The germ of a story, though, grows organically. My first novel, for example, came of a book I’d read – Tim Ferriss’s The 4-Hour Work Week – and from what I observed working in government. I imagined what it would be like to have served decades in this way and then suddenly realize that you had to escape. All the fear and doubt and excitement of that process. I added to that speculative process some research about that kind of transition process. From there, though, things got very systematic. I employed Randy Ingermanson’s Snowflake Method of composition, starting with a single sentence describing the protagonist and his situation and then adding facets stage by stage: expanding that sentence to a five-word paragraph, that paragraph to a page, that page to four. In between drafting stages there is character development, with full sketches for all (major and minor), including point-of-view summary paragraphs. The process is exhaustive and time consuming, and makes getting up to write at 4:30 everyday a necessary discipline. But it works.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Can’t say I have, though I do play out scenes, but more like a director of the stage in my head than as a character.

What advice would you give other writers?
1- Write. “Wanna” gets you nothing.
2- Get Criticized. Learn to love having your darlings killed for you.
3- Market. As Russell Blake says, you’re an artist up the point you finish the book. Then you’re a businessman.
4- Write again. Don’t be a one-trick pony

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Advice from two writers led me to self-publishing. Early one morning on watch (think 2 am or so), a fellow Naval Reservist told me about her indie writing career, showed me her trailers, etc. I was intrigued, having “always wanted to write.” Here was a way to do that. Shortly thereafter, I got back in touch with a Naval Academy classmate – also an indie writer – who was about to publish his fifth novel and was contemplating pulling the plug on his day job. Sounded great to me. Said classmate – thriller fiction writer Steven Konkoly – did indeed pull that plug (and just in time for bragging rights at our 20th reunion), and has continued to advise me about the business and the life of writing.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I’m hopeful in the same way I’m hopeful about the music industry. Both seem to be slipping from the grasps of the gatekeepers.

What do you use?
Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Contemporary fiction, suburban fiction, entrepreneurial fiction

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
J. F. Hussey Home Page Link
Link To J. F. Hussey Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8379390.J_F_Hussey

Interview with Author – Amanda Weaver @AWeaverWrites

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Author Bio:
Like many writers, Amanda Weaver spent her childhood telling stories. College steered her in a different direction and into a successful career as a designer. Several years ago, she picked up writing again as a hobby, to blow off some creative steam. One thing led to another, National Novel Writing Month happened, and here we are.

Amanda Weaver grew up in Florida and now lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband, daughter and two crazy cats.

What inspires you to write?
I’ve got stories unfolding in my head all the time. Sometimes it’s nothing more than some bits of dialogue or a really good scene. But some keep coming back, filling themselves in, and those are the ones I write down. Well, those are the ones I make notes about and PLAN to write down someday. The list is long.

Tell us about your writing process.
Once a story has rolled around in my head for a while, at some point, I will get hit with inspiration and a need to write. I do that, as much as feels right. Then I make myself stop, go back and properly outline the whole thing. Sometimes those initial inspirational bursts make it into the final story, sometimes they don’t, depending on how things develop.

I write in Scrivener, which has been a life saver. If I’m disciplined and fully outline the story there, then whenever I have a few minutes to write (and my life is very busy… minutes are hard to come by), then I’ve left myself a breadcrumb trail to follow. I don’t waste time trying to decide what to write next. I’ve already done that part.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
They definitely talk to me, often long after the story is done. I’ll hear a song and think “Oh, that’s exactly how Dillon would think when he’s forty five”, even though Dillon wasn’t even 30 when the book I wrote about him finished. Their lives go on in my head, even if I’ve stopped writing about them.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write! My favorite quote about writing comes from Jack London: “You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club”. I’ve found that to be very true. Sure, get inspired, but then write, write, write, even when you’re not inspired, even when it’s hard.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I’ve been writing for fun for many years and I was finally at a point where I wanted to share my work with the wider world. Although I write contemporary romance, my stories don’t always fit easily into their genre, so self-publishing seemed a better option for me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it’s changing every day. People like to talk about the “rules” of publishing, but I think the rule is that there aren’t any rules anymore. What was impossible yesterday might be the norm in five years or even one.

What do you use?
Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Contemporary Romance, Historical Romance

What formats are your books in?
eBook

Website(s)
Amanda Weaver Home Page Link
Link To Amanda Weaver Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7855753.Amanda_Weaver
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Amanda-Weaver/642963329073960
https://twitter.com/AWeaverWrites
http://www.pinterest.com/AWeaverWriter/

Interview with Author – R. Leonia Shea @RLeonia


Author Bio:
I grew up in coastal New England and on the Jersey Shore. Most of my summer vacations from school were spent writing stories or painting pictures, so I guess I can say I’ve always been an artist and a writer. I have a very professional day job that I love, but when I’m not working I’m busy being creative – it seems to recharge my batteries better than anything else. I’m currently an urban fantasy author, but I have a few stories that are nearing completion in other genres. I also run a small art and design business.

What inspires you to write?
I am inspired by the urge people have to reinvent themselves. I think it’s fascinating that we spend all of our time on the earth constantly evolving because things change in our lives. We get our first job and that changes who we are – we get married, and that changes how we view things…we are constantly faced with reevaluating who and what we are. That is the journey I take my characters on – the journey toward finding yourself no matter what situation you happen to be in.

Tell us about your writing process.
I generally start with the middle of the book. That is my first thread and where all of the other pieces get woven together. From the middle I work backwards to the beginning and then finally write the last part before I connect the middle to the end. My stories are crafted in this sort of “inside-out” manner because every layer changes something in another area and I like to move back and forth. I’ve tried outlining, index cards, power points…but in the end the words flowing out on the computer screen seem to work the best. When I do my final read through, I’m always amazed to find the threads that I’ve woven into the story are so clear because I’m not conscious of doing that all the time. I also tend to work on three to four books at a time to keep myself from getting stuck.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters are my commuting companions – they are in the car with me or walking down the street with me chatting about things that later become part of the story they are in. I often fall asleep at night thinking about plot twists or picturing story locations. I get totally absorbed in the stories and most Sundays I write from the time I get up until dinner time because I’ve spent all week talking to my characters and I simply MUST get their stories out. I like my characters – even those who aren’t honest or have ulterior motives. I see their growth and struggles as part of their journey and their decisions are shaped by their experiences. I make my characters explain themselves to me in the car and I guess I think of myself as their therapist.

What advice would you give other writers?
You need to keep at it. You’ll start brilliant books that go nowhere and you’ll get frustrated and give up, but one day you’ll get a spark of insight that will make you excited to finish that book. It took me almost four years to write Elementary Magic but when the spark of insight hit, I finished it in a month! My best piece of advice is this: When you get stuck, start writing a completely different book. Not only will your mind stop focusing on the fact that you’re stuck, but your ideas will flow a little easier because you’re using your imagination on a regular basis. It becomes a habit to create stories. Don’t force the book but trust that when you’re ready to tie it all together, it will happen. You just need to stay with it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I agonized and agonized over it, but in the end realized that I wanted to write and didn’t want my ambition and enthusiasm squashed by piles of rejection letters. I have never even tried to submit to a publisher because I have a day job that I love and I want to write because I love it. Whenever a hobby becomes “work”, I lose a little of my passion for that hobby. I decided to self-publish so I could enjoy the process without deadlines and so I could keep total control over the final product without feeling the stress from someone else looking over my shoulder.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think this is an exciting time to be a writer because there are so many options for publishing. I think we’re only just beginning to see the impact self-publishing will have on the market. I think there are great opportunities for all kinds of book related services from promotion and cover design to reviews and movie deals. I think we’re on the cusp of something great which will break down the walls that used to exist. Unknown authors have a chance at getting a small piece of the pie without needing to know someone in the industry and because of that, the industry is constantly changing and growing.

What do you use?
Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Urban Fanstasy, Contemporary Fiction (and coming soon: Historical Fiction)

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Author Home Page Link
Link To Author Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
http://www.goodreads.com/rleoniashea
http://www.facebook.com/rleonia.shea
http://www.twitter.com/RLeonia
http://www.pinterest.com/rleonia

Interview with Author – Kathy Fischer-Brown @KFischerBrown

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Author Bio:
As a child Kathy wanted to be a writer when she grew up. She also wanted to act on the stage. After receiving an MFA in Acting from the Mason Gross School of the Arts and playing the part of starving young artist in New York, she taught theater classes at a small college in the Mid-West before returning home to the East Coast, where over the years, she and her husband raised two kids and an assortment of dogs. During stints in advertising, children’s media publishing, and education reform in the former Soviet Unions, she wrote whenever she could.

Her love of early American history has its roots in family vacations up and down the East Coast visiting old forts and battlefields and places such as Williamsburg, Mystic Sea Port, and Old Sturbridge Village. During this time, she daydreamed in high school history classes, imagining the everyday people behind all the dates and conflicts and how they lived.

Claiming her best ideas are born of dreams, Kathy has written a number of stories over the years. Her first published novel, Winter Fire, a 1998 Golden Heart finalist in historical romance, was reissued in 2010 by Books We Love, Ltd., which also released Lord Esterleigh’s Daughter, Courting the Devil, and The Partisan’s Wife.
When not writing, she enjoys reading, cooking, photography, playing “ball” with the dogs, and rooting on her favorite sports teams.

What inspires you to write?
My inspiration comes from an assortment of sources–dreams, books, films, observations of people in day-to-life. As a writer of historical fiction, I love when my muse gets revved up by a particularly thought-provoking tidbit of information gleaned from old maps, obscure details or an event that occurred in the time period I research.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m definitely a pantser. My process has evolved throughout the years from my early training in the theater. I begin by getting into the characters’ heads, discovering what motivates, frustrates, makes them happy, sad, angry. From there I like to throw in the obstacles that prevent them from achieving their immediate and long-term goals. These can stem from their own physical or emotional limitations or from outside sources (bad guys, environment).

Since I write historicals and fantasy, I do a lot of research into my chosen time period on the beliefs and mores of the people, and events that influence daily life, the clothes they wore, the food they ate, etc. More times than not, these details influence the plot and how the characters interact with their world.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters are always talking to me, sometimes at the most inopportune times, such as when I’m in the shower or walking the dogs late at night.

While writing, I’m only too happy to have my characters talk to me and each other. If they didn’t communicate, it would be source of much frustration :-)

What advice would you give other writers?
Write, write, write. Then rewrite, rewrite, rewrite. Writing is a lonely profession, so it’s a good idea to join a critique group (either online or in your community) where you can not only receive the benefit of extra pairs of eyes (or ears), you can toss around ideas and find out where to submit your work, and also how to promote it.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I first started writing for publication, there were basically two ways to go: submit to established publishers, or go with a vanity press. The latter was not an option for writers who wanted to be taken seriously. And so I submitted by following the old rules: query letter and synopsis, and wait, sometimes for months on end for the inevitable form rejection or an invitation to submit a few chapters, or the entire manuscript. I managed to get an agent for a few years, but nothing came of it, as this was a time when small houses began to disappear into the ever-increasing number of merges and disappearing imprints.

In the mid-nineties, digital publishing appeared on the scene and was regarded in the beginning as the ugly step child. During this time, my books found homes at a number of these upstarts, but without a standard format for text and a lack of interest in the few reading devices on the market, two such publishers went under and a third did nothing to promote their authors. But in the intervening years, with the advent of quality ereaders, the landscape changed, and with it came the current boom in digital publishing and self-publishing.

To make a long story short, I was contacted some four years ago by Jude Pittman of Books We Love, who invited me to submit my 1998 Golden Heart Finalist novel, Winter Fire. BWL has since published my historical trilogy “The Serpent’s Tooth,” and will have first right of refusal on any subsequent works.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
For new writers, the possibilities of getting one’s book published are brighter now than they were 25 years ago, but with those possibilities comes the responsibility to be your own promotion specialist. The past few years have seen a new growth industry catering to self-published and independently published authors. With so many venues to choose from, a writer must stay on top of the trends and find the best ways to publicize and “brand” his or her work so it stands out from the thousands of books appearing on the market almost daily. That can be a job in and of itself.

What genres do you write?
Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Fantasy

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Kathy Fischer-Brown Home Page Link
Link To Kathy Fischer-Brown Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
http://www.facebook.com/KathyFischerBrownAuthor
http://twitter.com/KFischerBrown

Interview with Author – P. W. Fox @vulpes500

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Author Bio:
P. W. Fox, a.k.a. Wayne Howard, although born in Mississippi, grew up in Nevada, Japan and Guam, returning to Mississippi when he began high school. He attended college in Mississippi where he received a degree in chemistry from Mississippi State University, and after working as a plant chemist for two years, he returned to the university, for graduate study in geology and geochemistry both at Mississippi State and the University of Texas at Dallas. On leaving school, he worked for a number of years in the oil and gas industry in Texas before moving to Oregon, where he now lives and writes. He enjoys hiking , camping and visiting astronomical observatories.

What inspires you to write?
Technology advances, images, current events and the odd chance occurrence.

Tell us about your writing process.
I tend to use a combination of writing strategies. Some writing I do “seat-of-the pants” but for longer works I usually devise a broad outline, e.g. chapter prompts. I also find storyboards helpful at times.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
When writing dialog I often speak aloud what I think the character is wanting to say at that moment, but afterwards the character will tell me that that isn’t what they meant to say at all. Sometimes I try to make the characters do something that they consider out-of-character, and they let me know it in very short order.

What advice would you give other writers?
Build your platform early and if you’re an indie author give strong consideration to using a professional editor.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My book at 17,000 words was a work too short for a traditional publisher to publish as a book and too long for magazines. Self publishing was the only choice

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that there will always be a market for traditionally published books, but as the popularity of e-books continues to rise, the nature of the publishing industry will continue to evolve

What do you use?
Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
fantasy, science fiction, poetry

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
P. W. Fox Home Page Link
Link To P. W. Fox Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2779708.P_W_Fox
https://www.facebook.com/vulpes500?ref_type=bookmark
https://twitter.com/vulpes500

Interview with Author – Lauren Lynch @LaurenRLynch


Author Bio:
LAUREN LYNCH has lived in nine of the United States, but currently calls a log cabin in North Carolina home, along with her husband, teenage son, two dogs, a cat, five chickens and even the occasional bat.

What inspires you to write?
I’m a book lover. I think that, in itself, inspires me to write. I was a quiet, bookish kid—the firstborn of two bookworms—so I spent a lot of time alone, lost in fantasy worlds. I also enjoyed historical books featuring courageous girls: the Little House on the Prairie books, “Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank, Corrie Ten Boom’s “The Hiding Place.” My family moved a lot when I was young and these stories helped me approach each new situation with as much bravery as a shy girl could muster. The true-life stories I read inspired me to rise above my circumstances. Fantasy tales from authors like J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and Madeleine L’Engle provided an escape from reality and never failed to fuel my imagination. Now, I enjoy creating stories that combine the inspiration of history with the limitless adventures of fantasy.

Tell us about your writing process.
I spend several months researching the historical location and characters, immersing myself in the details I pull together until it comes alive in my mind and I’m dreaming about it at night. Once I have a strong mental image of it all, I pull out a pad and brainstorm, sketching out the details as they pop into my mind. I form a very rough outline, adding more details here and there as I’m inspired. Once I’m that immersed in it, details even come at night and I keep a pad near my bed to jot down notes. I start with a beginning and end in mind — and a rough idea of how I get from start to finish, but the middle develops as I write. For me, immersion is key.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Only in my dreams. Empathy has always been one of my strongest gifts. I use that skill to get inside my characters’ heads, then I think, act and create dialogue from their unique perspectives.

What advice would you give other writers?
Never give in to your doubts. Never give up. Never go a day without reading and writing something … anything. (Or, if your glass is half full … persist, persevere and proliferate ;)

How did you decide how to publish your books?
For me, I never considered anything but self-publishing. It was a combination of opportune timing, technical advances and my unique skill set — something my career in graphic design gave me the ability to do (like cover design and book formatting). I’ve always loved a challenge, and self-publishing just seemed like the way to go for me. I never really visualized myself attempting the traditional route … maybe I’m a control freak? Or a rebel? I have great respect for the publishing industry and those who chose that path, it just wasn’t the right one for me. The only advice I can offer new authors making this decision is to evaluate your own personality and skills. Do enjoy working independently or do you prefer team work? Self-publishing is a LOT of work and requires self-motivation, but then you reap ALL the rewards.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Exciting and full of options. Some writers will always prefer going the traditional route and having the support of a team (and it does seem like a luxury at times to have that option). I think the traditional path will survive just fine. With all the developments in self-publishing, the playing field has not only leveled, but flooded. I think the standards will continue to rise. The opportunities are endless. eReaders are a cool development, books will continue to become more interactive. Yes … exciting.

What do you use?
Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Speculative Fiction / Historical Fantasy

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Lauren Lynch Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22598085-the-place-of-voices?from_search=true
https://www.facebook.com/laurenrlynch
https://twitter.com/LaurenRLynch
http://www.pinterest.com/readlaurenlynch

Interview with Author – Clark Graham

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Author Bio:
I guess I have always had an enjoyment for writing. I like forming stories and adding details and complications along the way and then guide it to a conclusion.

I had a teacher in grade eight that used to go through a pile of writing assignments to get to mine first. She would read it and then look over at me and say ‘good job.’ It made that shy student more confident.

What inspires you to write?
I had a goal to write a novel before I died, so I wrote Dwarves of Elvenshore. I sent it to a publisher but I never got a response back so I sat on it for several years. When I learned about ebooks, I edited it and put it on Amazon. The sales far exceeded my expectations. I tried to write in other genres but they didn’t sell as well as that first book, so I made it into a series by adding six more books. Response to the Elvenshore Series has been wonderful.

Tell us about your writing process.
For a while I would write down an outline of what the chapter titles would be and then I would fill them in. I found that the things I wanted to say in the outline didn’t always match what I wanted to say in the book. I would end up changing titles, deleting titles and sometimes the last half of the book had no relationship to how the outline looked.

Now I just sit and write as I know the general direction of where I want to go. If I come up with better ideas as I am writing then I can add them into the story without worrying about how to fit them in an outline.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t. I write out their names and get to know them as I am writing the story. I fill out their personalities and bring them to life, but never talk to them.

What advice would you give other writers?
If you are going to write a book, don’t stop. Write a little every week at least so you can keep the story going. When you stop a lot of times you are stopping for good and the story that is inside you dies.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I self publish because it allows me the freedom to market how I feel and set prices. I do my own covers for the most part. Sometimes I get talented artist that I know to help me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I see opportunities for both traditional publishing and self published authors. There are a lot of readers out there, the market will expand as more and more exciting books become available.

What do you use?
Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Epic Fantasy, Myster and Suspence, Youth Fantasy.

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Clark Graham Home Page Link
Link To Clark Graham Page On Amazon

Interview with Author – Ripley Patton @rippatton

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Author Bio:
Ripley Patton lives in Portland, Oregon with one cat, two teenagers, and a man who wants to live on a boat. She is an award-winning short story writer and author of The PSS Chronicles, a young adult paranormal thriller series.

Ripley doesn’t smoke, or drink, or cuss as much as her characters. Her only real vices are writing, eating M&Ms, and watching reality television.

What inspires you to write?
A love of story. Reading and writing have always been the way I make sense of the world and find meaning in the ordinary, unpleasant or mundane. Everything is better as story.

Tell us about your writing process.
I approach writing very organically. I don’t make myself write because I almost always want to. And if I don’t, I probably need to go on a walk, or garden, or eat ice cream, or read, or take a shower, or drink, or think, until I do again. I also do not outline. Where’s the fun in that? I write books for the same reason I read them– to find out what happens.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to them, at least not out loud, but they certainly talk to me and do things I did not predict or expect. I love it when my characters surprise me.

What advice would you give other writers?
There is no such thing as a perfect book. Write the best book you can and then write another one. Don’t worry about perfect. It doesn’t exist.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I wrote my first novel because I was prompted to by a New York City agent to do so. She had read some of my short fiction online and liked it. But by the time I’d written and honed that book, three years later, she wasn’t in the business anymore. Things in the publishing industry were changing fast, mainly the rise of self-publishing and the indie author, and I could see that I ought to catch that train while the tracks were still hot. So, I self-published and I’ve never regretted it. I love being in control of my own work from concept, to cover design, through to the publication and marketing process. Who wouldn’t want to make their own books for a living?

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think it will be a wild and crazy ride, and the key for new and upcoming authors is to be informed, self-educated, flexible, and internet savvy.

What do you use?
Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Young Adult, Teen, Paranormal, Thriller

What formats are your books in?
Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Ripley Patton Home Page Link
Link To Ripley Patton Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4340243.Ripley_Patton
https://www.facebook.com/writerripleypatton
https://twitter.com/rippatton