Interview with Author – Rolland Love

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About Rolland Love:
Rolland Love is the author of award winning short stories, novels, a best selling computer book and a co-author of Homegrown in the Ozarks: Mountain Meals and Memories, a cookbook that was a finalist for best book of the year in Missouri. He created and presents workshops on journaling, writing, storytelling, life history for children and senior adults. He is a speaker, has appeared on talk shows, been interviewed by the Kansas City Star, and other publications have written stories about his Mark Twain writing style.

Rolland was a board member with the Lewis and Clark Historic Kaw Point Park, an environmental group for ten years. He was a reenactor with the Lewis and Clark bicentennial expedition and played the role of Silas Goodrich, expert fisherman. He created a workshop about the adventure which he presents to schools, libraries, retirement centers, civic groups …

Love co-founded a company that published an software series dealing with health education for young adults. He also directed the Respiratory Care department at Barnes Hospital, a twelve hundred bed teaching institution affiliated with Washington University in St. Louis.

What inspires you to write?
I grew up in a remote area of the Ozark Mountains and helped my uncle run a fishing camp during the summer. During the winter months I helped with chores on our farm milked cows, feed hogs, gathered eggs and help my mother cook. Many of my stories are based on our family living off the land and what life was like before electricity came to our neck of the woods. This played a role in my inspiration to write about the simple things in life.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I talked to my characters mainly when I wrote a play about Silas Goodrich, expert fisherman the character I played as a reenactor during the Lewis and Clark bicentennial in 2004.

What advice would you give other writers?
Go to my Imastory.com website and review my How To Write A Novel. Also Ozarkstories.com has an interview about my life in the Ozark Mountains that has some good advice.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
When I worked with Apple Computer in 1980 at a time the Apple 11 was being release I wrote a software directory that was so popular I sold over 100,000 copies. I wrote the book, published the book and was responsible for all the marketing. After that I was totally independent.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
All forms of book publishing has a great future if the marketing is solid.

What genres do you write?: I have written everything from computer books, mystery suspense, a cookbook, YA …

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Rolland Love Home Page Link
Link To Rolland Love Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

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Interview with Author – Constance Bretes

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About Constance Bretes:
Constance Bretes is an author of contemporary romance and suspense. Her romance books are often set in different parts of the country, but her favorite site is Montana.

She’s married to her best friend and resides in Michigan with him and a houseful of cats.

When she’s not at her regular 8 to 5 job, she can be found writing, researching, and spending time with her husband.

What inspires you to write?
I love visiting different towns and imagining romance in that town’s setting. I also like to write about this my husband and I like to do, such as sapphires digging and gold panning. Some of my stories come from fantasies I’ve had in the past. I love getting those ideas on the computer and out to the world.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start with a brief outline to guide me as I write and help me to stay focus on where I want to go. I also list all the characters and their names and occupations. I just write the outline using Microsoft Word and if I add more people to the story, then I add more to the characters list.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters talk to each other in my head and I listen to them. Sometimes, my husband will respond to one of my characters, if I talk with him about what they are saying or doing. Since I write romance, I find it very helpful when he does this, then I can actually have a man’s response to a question or situation.

What advice would you give other writers?
Be creative, have a good support team, get with other authors who write the same genre as you do, and believe in yourself.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I am a newbie at writing and publishing my books. I’ve done three of them this year with a publisher. If you are a newbie, I recommend you go with a publisher who will help you to get your name out there and help promote your books. I would not do self-publish unless you got a good fan-base to back you up. The publisher I have is excellent and I’m very satisfied with the results thus far.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
E-book publishing is on the rise. More and more people are going to ereader devices. This is great for me, I think, because I only have so much room to house paper or hard cover books.

What genres do you write?: Contemporary Romance, Romance Suspense

What formats are your books in?: eBook

Website(s)
Constance Bretes Home Page Link
Link To Constance Bretes Page On Amazon

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Interview with Author – Kyoko M.

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About Kyoko M.:
Kyoko M is an author, a fangirl, and an avid book reader. Her debut novel, The Black Parade, has been on Amazon’s Bestseller List at #5 in the Occult Horror category. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English Lit degree from the University of Georgia, which gave her every valid excuse to devour book after book with a concentration in Greek mythology and Christian mythology. When not working feverishly on a manuscript (or two), she can be found buried under her Dashboard on Tumblr, or chatting with fellow nerds on Twitter, or curled up with a good Harry Dresden novel on a warm central Florida night. Like any author, she wants nothing more than to contribute something great to the best profession in the world, no matter how small.

What inspires you to write?
I once saw a quote that said, and I’m paraphrasing, “Write the story you wish existed.” I didn’t hear that quote until later this year, but I realized that’s what I ended up doing with The Black Parade series. There isn’t a mainstream urban fantasy series with a woman of color. Sure, women of color in fantasy are plentiful, but they aren’t as popular as they should be. I found myself inspired by the 2005 film ‘Constantine’ (very loosely based on the Hellblazer comics) to create a black female protagonist in an urban fantasy setting, and I will not rest until Jordan Amador gets her shot in the spotlight of mass media. This is not to say she is the best role model, because she’s got issues out the wazoo, but the intelligent, grounded, cynical, but still kind character that she is needs to be seen. People need to know about her and other black women like her. I want to someday be able to see the spotlight on women of color in literature, television, and film, and I hope that it will open people’s eyes to new types of storytelling.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m a seat-of-the-pants writer in terms of the process. I usually work out the plot before I put a single word on the page and then I examine each main character’s personality to come up with the internal conflict. Everyone has issues, and their reactions to the external conflict is what drives the story. Some scenes I see very clearly when I start a novel, but others congeal as the characters start to mix together. People naturally butt heads due to their upbringing, personal beliefs, and personality traits, and that’s how each chapter ends up progressing.

I usually don’t outline my novels until they are at the halfway point. My outlines aren’t nuanced or anything. I use them to keep track of time, dates, and settings, and occasionally for a countdown. For instance, all the bad stuff goes down in She Who Fights Monsters on Halloween, so I had to make sure the day time and night time hours passed naturally instead of accidentally skipping over one or the other as Team Amador drew closer to the deadline. I also don’t have any fancy software or papers for the outline. I just open a Word document and write down the dates, then make bullet points for major plot points until the entire thing is filled. Matter of fact, the reason my newest YA epic fantasy novel is giving me so much trouble is because my deadline feels too far away and I’m having trouble getting to that day when all the crazy stuff happens. Ah, to be an author…so fun!

As far as character sketches, I don’t physically write them down either. I don’t quite feel like I’m creating the characters I write about. It’s more like they walk up to me and introduce themselves and I’m merely transcribing as they tell me who they are and why they matter. For example, I have two more books coming next year, but the one after those two already has a cast of characters and a plot in my head, even though it won’t be out until 2016 or later. My head is kind of like a conference room where I move from table to table and the characters wait patiently until I get to them.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes, I listen. I don’t talk because I think that’s a bit odd, but the way I see it is they are already fully formed and come up to me to have their stories told. I thought about doing a cute little exercise where I have a conversation with my personal favorite character (Belial, the antagonist of The Black Parade series) but I was worried my readers would think I needed a psychiatrist so I left that idea alone. However, I’m finding out more and more that authors do fun character interviews on their blog so that might be an activity I try later on.

What advice would you give other writers?
Don’t give up. It’s a struggle to keep writing because every day, it feels like no one cares. You have a very tiny cheering section and it really has to be all you. You’re doing the work, and no one can do it for you, and it feels so miserable when you start out by yourself. However, think about the positives. Think about your future. Think about people reading and enjoying your work, and power through the misery. You can do this. It’s a hard, long process, but you will learn that it’s worth it if you put in the work.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I started out querying agents, just like most authors, but I didn’t get anywhere after two years and it completely devastated my confidence, so I started looking into self-publishing. I took a while to suss out what it would take to get my novel out there, and then I went for it. It took a long time to get the process down, but it was worth it when that first paperback proof of The Black Parade arrived and I held it in my hands.

The easiest place to start for new authors is CreateSpace. 90% of your readers will get the e-Book, not the paperback, but physical copies are going to be very important for marketing your book in real life, not just online. It’s also very beneficial to have on hand if you attend conventions like I do. CreateSpace is 100% free and they can import all your book’s info directly to Amazon Kindle Publishing, so you don’t have to lift a finger.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
What am I? Psychic? The hell if I know!

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Urban Fantasy, Paranormal, Supernatural

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Kyoko M. Home Page Link
Link To Kyoko M. Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
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Interview with Author – Rena Koontz

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About Rena Koontz:
An award-winning journalist, Rena Koontz broke into the publishing world in September 2012. The debut of “Love’s Secret Fire” was the realization of a lifelong dream to write books – books that combine romance, suspense and strong female characters designed to mirror today’s women.

All the material was there. Working as a career news reporter at two of the country’s top 20 newspapers provided a writing journey that took Rena into the sports arena, politics, feature writing, editorial writing, and, her favorite, cops and courts.

She has chased fire trucks and police cars, covered all sorts of crimes, including murders, and reported criminal, civil, high profile and ordinary trials. Many of the ideas for her books come from real cases she is familiar with.
Plus, being married to a retired FBI agent provides a source for invaluable technical advice. He’s pretty good with the romance parts as well!

Rena has received numerous journalism awards including recognition by the Associated Press for writing excellence.

Her second romantic suspense, “The Devil She Knew,” released in July 2013.

A Pittsburgh native, Rena now makes her home in Florida, having recently relocated from Central Illinois.

“Thief of the Heart” is her third novel.

What inspires you to write?
I’ve always been a writer. I used to leave my mother two-page letters, printed in a child’s script, telling her about what my dolls did that day. I also have a vivid imagination — I sit in a restaurant and imagine the lives and conversations of the customers sitting nearby. Combine those two passions with a journalism career that exposed me to crime, corruption, love and life and it’s a formula for some great stories. Plus, I’ve met so many wonderful people who deserve to be in a book.

Tell us about your writing process.
I’m a pantser. My ideas come from the tiniest nuggets — an odd name, a song lyric, or a simple statement that strikes a chord will start my creative wheels spinning. For example, I once interviewed a coroner about a murder victim who died with her eyes wide open. He told me, “Death surprised her,” and that registered somewhere in my brain. It’s now part of my WIP for a new romantic suspense. Once I have that nugget, I let my characters take over. Often I’m surprised at what they do.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
My characters become very real to me. I need to know them well enough to know what flavor ice cream they might select or what their favorite sports team is and why. I don’t talk to them — they talk to me. It’s their story I tell, not mine.

What advice would you give other writers?
Write from your heart. Write the book you want to write, regardless of trends. Anything less will seem phony.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
As a newer author, I realize that I have to start with a smaller publisher and work my way up to the New York Times Best Sellers list.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think there is room for both digital and print books. The future is wide open.

What genres do you write?: Romantic Suspense and Contemporary Romance

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Rena Koontz Home Page Link
Link To Rena Koontz Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook

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Interview with Author – J. B. Cantwell

About J. B. Cantwell:
When she was twelve, J. B. Cantwell flew across the field, bareback on the crazy mare who loved to run. She pushed her faster, faster, not caring if she might fall to the hard ground below. The joy came from the challenge of staying on, the pride of knowing that she had the skill and the heart and the courage to grip hard and ride.

Life is like that crazy mare. You never know if she’ll step right or left, or stay quietly still and give you a moment to breathe.

Everyone has a story to tell.

J. B. has never traveled to the Maylin Fold, but these are the stories of her life.

What inspires you to write?
More than anything, I have a desire to communicate. I think everyone out there, children included, have complicated, sometimes painful, lives. It’s important to acknowledge that it’s okay to feel hurt sometimes, but also that it’s okay to move forward from unpleasant events, too. Life is a fight. I want to encourage others to keep fighting. And to never lose hope in the promise of the future.

Tell us about your writing process.
I start with a general outline, each chapter break with notes about what I’m going to write and why. Unfortunately, my characters seem to have their own ideas sometimes, and the story will then take me in a different direction. This is fine as long as I can come around to the same basic themes in the end. But having an outline at the beginning makes it a lot easier to start a project, when it doesn’t always yet have a life of its own.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to my characters, but I do imagine that I’m sitting right there in the middle of their conversations. I ask myself questions. What would I think? How would I be feeling emotionally? Would my body be relaxed, uncomfortable, tense? I try to listen to the actual voices of the characters to help figure out their eccentricities and bring some life to them.

What advice would you give other writers?
Writing is hard. Don’t quit. Revise. A lot.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I originally pursued a traditional publisher when I completed the first version of Aster Wood. But I hadn’t yet learned how to revise well, and just how intense my revisions in that case needed to be. In the end, as the work improved, I decided to self-publish as I learned how much more control I would have over the final product.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that there is still a place for the traditional publishing houses. They really are the gatekeepers of quality writing in many ways. But obviously the independent market is growing in leaps and bounds, and there’s a lot of talent there as well. Ultimately, it’s up to the reader to decide which characters speak to them. I think there is a solid place in the market for both traditional and independent publishers.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Middle Grade and Young Adult Fantasy, Action & Adventure

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
J. B. Cantwell Home Page Link
Link To J. B. Cantwell Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
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Facebook

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Interview with Author – Marilyn Peake

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About Marilyn Peake:
Marilyn Peake is the author of both novels and short stories. Her publications have received excellent reviews. Marilyn’s one of the contributing authors in BOOK: THE SEQUEL, published by The Perseus Books Group, with one of her entries included in serialization at THE DAILY BEAST. In addition, Marilyn has served as Editor of a number of anthologies. Her short stories have been published in seven anthologies and on the literary blog, GLASS CASES. AWARDS: Silver Award, two Honorable Mentions and eight Finalist placements in the ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards, two Winner and two Finalist placements in the EPPIE Awards, and Winner of the Dream Realm Awards.

What inspires you to write?
I’m very much inspired by the news. I’m kind of a news junkie and most of the news these days is either horrifying or depressing. I like to take real-world events and spin fictional stories from them. Much of my fiction has an angle of social justice—either pointing out situations in which social justice doesn’t exist or suggesting ways in which that could be remedied. Many of my heroes and heroines are characters who are down on their luck at the beginning of the story.

Tell us about your writing process.
I used to be a seat of the pants writer. This past year, I made an outline on my computer for SHADE, my Young Adult Mystery novel with Paranormal elements, and that worked out wonderfully for me. It made the writing process so much easier, I used that method for the very next thing I wrote: my short story, MUTATION Z: THE EBOLA ZOMBIES.

I don’t create detailed character sketches; but I do jot down lots of notes about the characters I’m developing, and I spend a great deal of time thinking about them during the entire time I’m working on a story.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Sometimes. I love language and dialogue. I experiment with the language in my novels and short stories, including the rhythm and sound of that language. I’ll sometimes say the words out loud, and that includes my characters’ dialogue.

What advice would you give other writers?
To read a lot, to practice your craft, and to never give up.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
In the past, I’ve been published through indie press and I came very close to signing with a wonderful Literary Agent. Right now, I’m self-publishing my work through Amazon because the possibilities seem limitless there. Many of the happiest and most successful writers I know are self-published through Amazon.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I think that book publishing is going through huge changes right now. In many ways, we’re experiencing a Renaissance in which many great writers are being discovered because more writers have access to the tools necessary for writing and publishing. I feel very positive and excited about the future of book publishing.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery, Horror, Zombie Fiction, Conspiracy Fiction, Children’s, Young Adult, and Adult

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Marilyn Peake Home Page Link

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
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Interview with Author – Pamela J. Dodd

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About Pamela J. Dodd:
Pamela J. Dodd currently serves as an adjunct instructor of English at a local technical college. She is also a wife a mother, and a grandmother. Having grown up among people who told stories for entertainment as well as education, she enjoys visiting with readers and others interested in writing. She loves stories, whether in print, on the screen, or just told at family gatherings. Her debut novel, The Gift Horse, is a contemporary suspense yarn, and her science fiction novel, Trinity on Tylos, was recently re-released as a Kindle eBook.

What inspires you to write?
Everything! Nothing! Seriously, there are as many reasons to write as there are writers. In my case, I began writing because I couldn’t always find want I wanted to read in my local library or bookstore. Striving to be different is still a goal for my writing, and often reviewers use the “term” unique to describe my stories.

Tell us about your writing process.
Fiction begins as an idea, then as scenes, and if the scenes are compelling (to me anyway) I begin to add more scenes. At some point, the novel begins to take on a life of its own. Also, I am constantly editing. When I return to a story that I have been working on, I re-read what I wrote previously, and if I like it, I keep going along. If I don’t like it, I either fix it or delete and try again. This is a lengthy process, obviously, and I don’t publish often, because I am still re-writing. For me, writing is like polishing a gem, there is always something else to do to make it better.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
For a time, I really try to crawl into their heads and “be” that person. Every character is not me, nor am I every character, but the reasons they do what they do must make sense to me.

What advice would you give other writers?
Here are some things I have learned while writing for publication:

Do get professional help in editing. I have thirty years of experience evaluating writing, but my editors have helped me improve and pointed out problems that I totally missed. Poor editing keeps many books out of print, and it can make authors who have real talent look bad. People who decide to self-publish ought to seek a good editor, because poorly edited books make self-publishing a risky business.

Do keep writing. If the first efforts don’t provide the success you want, keep at it. Experience is a great teacher.

Don’t take rejection personally. (That one is hard, though. Really hard.)

Don’t expect to get rich. Not everyone you know will buy your book, and getting people who don’t know something about you to buy it can be even more difficult.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
My first book, The Gift Horse, was accepted by a publisher who was less than honest, and then she died. (No, I didn’t do it!) At that point, lots of folks in my small town knew I had a book coming out, so to keep that process going, I used a self-publishing company. While it wasn’t a glowing sales success, the second company was honest, and that book still sells several copies a year.

For my second novel, Trinity on Tylos, I was accepted by a small press, which emphasized eBooks but also printed trade paperbacks. For a while, they paid royalties, then they didn’t. Nor did they communicate, so a few years after the initial contract expired, I asked to withdraw the book from their company and I decided to “repackage” it with a new cover and some editing, and I published it via Kindle Direct.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I was an early adopter of eBooks, reading them on first my laptop, then a Palm, and now I use my iPad. With every new device, the eBook experience seems to get better.

Like many people, I still enjoy putting a book in my hands and turning the pages, but as a business model, print publishing is fading fast. Printing large numbers of books, storing them in warehouses, then putting them “on consignment” in stores, then collecting the “remainders” for resale as bargain books or recycling them is kinda stupid. Delivering a file, electronically, is more sustainable, cheaper, and puts more options in the hands of readers. In short, eBooks are the future.

What do you use?: Professional Cover Designer, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: contemporary suspense, science fiction

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Pamela J. Dodd Home Page Link
Link To Pamela J. Dodd Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads

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Interview with Author – R Weir

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About R Weir:
R Weir is an IT Professional by day, Author by night, and first and foremost a husband and father living in Colorado. Enjoying the outdoors, travelling in a Motorhome and riding motorcycles are his hobbies. His first short story eBook on Amazon “The Case of the Missing Bubble Gum Card” has received excellent reviews and downloads, with the follow-up novel “Tracking a Shadow” now available on Amazon in Kindle format and paperback.

What inspires you to write?
I’m ask that a lot and I’m not certain. I’ve always had an active imagination since childhood. Thoughts and ideas are always rolling around in my head. So it sort of a way to get them out of my brain so it won’t explode. :-)

Tell us about your writing process.
I do some outlining, but mostly I’m pants writer and as I write I go where the story takes me. I also write in clusters, where I can sit down and write several thousand words very quickly. I use MS Word and Scrivener for outlining

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I don’t talk to them, but since I write in 1st person I am my main character Jarvis Mann while I’ve writing. So it’s a little bit like acting where I fill his shoes. It’s his eyes that see what is happening and his reactions to what is going on around him.

What advice would you give other writers?
Try to write as much as you can, even if it’s bad, get it out. When you have ideas write them down somehow. And stick with it if you’re dedicated in being a writer because it will take time to establish a fame base.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Amazon is the biggest seller of eBook in the world. No matter their tactics or what you think of them, you have to use them. They have great and easy to use tools to self-publish. And the same is true of Createspace. The only bad thing is there are so many books on Amazon it’s easy to get buried under all the other books.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Well it’s eBooks for certain and Indie authors will soon rule. Traditional publishing still has it’s place but to a lesser degree. Beyond that it’s hard to say. The only thing that concerns me is the pricing on eBooks has gotten so low it’s really hard to make a living at it and I believe that most writers would like to write full time. But economics won’t allow it for most.

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Mystery/Detective/Crime

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
R Weir Home Page Link
Link To R Weir Page On Amazon
Link to Author Page on other site

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Facebook
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Interview with Author – Ernestine Rose

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About Ernestine Rose:
I grew up on the west side of Chicago during the turbulent 50’s and 60’s. Adopted by an older couple, I spent a great deal of time as a child reading and participating in dance and drama club activities in school. Bradley University and the University of Dallas prepared me for a successful career as a teacher of English, speech and theater in Peoria and Fort Worth, where I earned numerous educator awards. As a retired public school teacher and mother of four sons, I made my debut as a writer with the publication of three books in 2012: 7 Tips for A Successful Marriage, Raising the Roses, and Tales from the Family Tree. I currently work with DVA Productions, a local theater company in Fort Worth, teaching acting classes and directing plays. I also edit books for other writers with a story to tell. Inspired by Toni Morrison, Alice Walker,and Zora Neale Hurston, my focus in both writing and theater is on the power of language, love, and family.

What inspires you to write?
I’m an avid reader. In fact, that’s my book review handle on Amazon. I love to get into the world of the writer, to love or hate the characters, to plan the outcome of their stories as it unfolds from the pages. I love to savor the ending of a book and ponder on the characters between readings. Sometimes I’m disappointed, and I can’t help but feel that I could have done a better job myself. So why not? Why not make up my own characters and work out their outcomes in an entertaining and hopefully lyrical way? Why not grab life by the horns and put it on the page myself? I’ve been blessed with a wonderful husband, four fine sons, and a beautiful home. In many ways, writing is a way of sharing the joy, and it’s also great therapy for the troubled times. Teaching was rewarding, but writing brings a sense of freedom and satisfaction like nothing else.

Tell us about your writing process.
I have notebooks. First a little one to jot down topic ideas, no more than one per page. Then a larger one to map out the general plan, on from one to several pages. I list what I want to include in each story or chapter. Sometimes, I stick to that; sometimes, I don’t. After that, I just talk to the page. Mostly, I talk out loud as I type, and yes, I do talk to the characters. My best writing is done when I’m “in the zone,” oblivious to everything else but the text I’m working on. I need big blocks of time to work this way, and freedom from stress. Some people write in longhand first, but not me. I may not be able to read it. The more I’m thinking, the faster (and sloppier) I write. So translating my hectic scribble could be a problem. When I get to a stopping point (or what I think is the end), I quit. The next day, I pick it up, read it, and decide what changes need to be made.Then I pick up my “conversation” all over again. What a great way to spend a day!

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
Yes, I do! I talk to them at the computer as I write, in the back yard as I plan, and in the bathroom mirror. When my husband catches me, I just play it off and tell him I was singing or something. Reading my work out loud helps me “feel the words,” too. I can’t imagine just “mentalizing” a book and not having a personal connection to the people in it. Sometimes I go back and change a character’s name because it didn’t fit them or their environment. Sometimes I just scrap what I’ve done with a character and rewrite all their dialogue because I didn’t think they were interesting enough (or too much like me). I love the freedom that fiction allows to do just that.

What advice would you give other writers?
Though I’m sixty-three, I still consider myself a baby at this writing thing. I go to workshops, read reviews, and visit with other writers, trying to understand the process better and learn more about how to make it work. I haven’t had a bestseller yet, so I can only pass on the advice that’s been given to me. Persevere. Keep writing. Don’t second-guess yourself. And write everyday. I’m no where near accomplishing these things, but I’m trying to do them more and more.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I always wanted to write after I retired from teaching. But most of the information I got about the publishing process involved sending out hundreds of query letters and manuscripts, expecting to be rejected over and over again. Well, I don’t like rejection. Nor do I like wasting money on copying and mailing. I certainly didn’t have money to pay a vanity publisher, hoping that they would be worth the investment, and not change everything or leave me stranded. I’ve heard horror stories. But with everything I heard about the influence of e-books and the ease and control of self-publishing, it seemed the logical way to go. It took me a few tries to get the formatting right, but I just kept starting another book while I explored the programs and when I found Createspace and KDP, I put up all three books in a week.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
I’m sad to see so many independent book stores closing. There’s nothing like holding a real book in your hands and turning the pages. But I also love the speed and convenience (not to mention the low cost), of downloading ebooks to my Kindle or Ipad. So I guess I’m grateful for the technology that has given us digital books and self-publishing. But like any writer, of course I’d love to have a major publisher who did all the publicity and marketing for me, especially if I could get big checks and advances. Maybe that day will come and maybe it won’t, but meanwhile I’ll keep plugging away at what I do. I love Facebook and the way authors and book groups network and encourage each other. Without the changes in publishing, many writers would never be read. There are fabulous books and wonderful people that have come out of these changes. I like to think that I’m one of them.

What genres do you write?: Literary fiction; memoir; family & relationships

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Ernestine Rose Home Page Link
Link To Ernestine Rose Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter

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Interview with Author – Andrew Salmon

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About Andrew Salmon:
Multiple Pulp Factory Award winner, Ellis and multiple Pulp Ark and Pulp Factory Award nominee Andrew Salmon lives and writes in Vancouver, BC. His novels include: The Forty Club, The Dark Land, The Light Of Men, and Three, Ghost Squad: Rise of the Black Legion (with Ron Fortier), and Sherlock Holmes: Work Capitol.

And he has appeared in the following anthologies: Secret Agent X: Volume One and Three, Jim Anthony Super Detective Volume One, Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective Volumes One, Two, Three, Four and Five, Black Bat Mystery Volume One, Mars McCoy Space Ranger Volume One, Mystery Men (&Women) Volume Two, Moon Man Vol. One, The Ruby Files Vol. One, The New Adventures of Thunder Jim Wade Vol. One, Ghost Boy Vol. One, All-Star Pulp Comics #2 and Box Thirteen: Adventure Wanted.

What inspires you to write?
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan turned me into a writer with one viewing! I went into the theater a reader and came out a writer as all of the machinery of writing were suddenly revealed to me while watching the film. I’ve been writing ever since though it is only in the last decade that I have been doing it full time for several publishers. Anything inspires me and I never know what will touch off the next tale.

Tell us about your writing process.
The journey of a tale begins, for me, with that one simple thing that just sticks in my mind: a character, an image, a scene, an incident. From there the tale grows organically. I let it simmer in the back of my brain until I’ve got enough to begin the writing process. I don’t outline. I let the tale find its way over the course of the first draft. Once that is complete, I look it over and the meaning of the tale reveals itself to me. Then I revise accordingly until I’m satisfied with the work. Then off it goes with fingers crossed.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
I’ve been writing a lot of Sherlock Holmes stories of late and it has gotten to the point that this dynamic duo often have conversations in my head. Writing their interactions has become easier with each outing. Coming up with a dandy of a plot – ah, there’s the rub. Holmes does explain his reasoning to me, which is a big help. All I have to do is write down what he says. Spooky, but that’s how I roll.

What advice would you give other writers?
Read! Read! Read! Read! Everything you can get your hands on starting out. And don’t get locked into a specific genre. Read the classics, old pulp authors, today’s mainstream writers, indies – don’t be a snob. In the beginning, you are a sponge and need to read everything!

Practice! Practice! Practice! Keep writing and finish every tale you start – even if it’s utter junk. Finish it! You’ll learn from every experience while learning to finish what you start.

If you’re self-publishing, do it right. If your cover can hold its own against a pro cover, get a new one. If your prose doesn’t stack up to the competition, keep working. Publishing sub-par or still-amateur stuff will not help you. It won’t sell and your reputation as a writer will take the hit. These days everyone can be published so there’s no rush. Don’t throw it out there until it’s ready!

How did you decide how to publish your books?
Mainstream publishers wouldn’t touch me. Knowing I could write (award nominations and wins) yet not being able to get through the door lead me to smaller presses like Fight Card Books, Airship 27 and Radio Archives who all gave me the chance to show what I could do. Fight Card Books (an author collective) allowed me to self-publish under the Fight Card umbrella and with their assistance. Once I saw how easy it was and saw the $$ coming in, that was it for me. Self-publishing works for me.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Printed books are going to become luxury items much like the deluxe CD boxsets being offered today. I’m not happy about this as I’m a print guy. But I do read and enjoy ebooks as well. Still the writing is on the wall (or the screen in this case) and ebooks are here to stay. As a writer, ebooks have been a godsend. Earning money as an author is every writer’s dream and I’m doing that. Not much at the moment but the future looks bright. Legacy publishing is a thing of the past. These days, everyone gets a shot and the avalanche of material already out there is staggering. Stuff that wouldn’t get a second look from the “Big Guns” because it doesn’t read like James Patterson can be released to find an audience. It’s great! It means more work for the writer but it also means virtually unlimited choice for the reader and at every price point. What’s not to love? The future is bright and shiny!

What do you use?: Professional Editor, Professional Cover Designer

What genres do you write?: mystery, detecive, hard boiled, action adventure, pulp, historical, Victorian mystery

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Link To Andrew Salmon Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

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Interview with Author – Kristina Kaine

Author Bio:
Kristina Kaine has worked with people all her life: during her early career in medical sales and staff recruitment, and since 1987 in her own business which matches people in business partnerships. Through this rich interaction with people, Kristina has observed the struggle for self identity from many angles. She was awakened to the ideas of Rudolf Steiner by Rev Mario Schoenmaker, attending all of Schoenmaker’s lectures for 14 years. After Schoenmaker’s death in 1997, Kristina realised the need to explain the knowledge of the threefold human being in simple terms that could be applied easily in daily life. She has set this out in her book, ‘I Connecting : the Soul’s Quest’, which was published in 2007 by Robert Sardello through Goldenstone Press. It is not unusual for Kristina to receive comments about her book like this: “It seems like a very lucid treatment, like looking through a clear glass window through which one can discover and recognize the landscape of the soul.”
Since 2003 Kristina has written weekly reflections which apply this knowledge of the threefold human being to Bible texts. This is not done in the context of any particular religious beliefs but from a broader perspective that all religions could apply. These reflections are distributed by email and are read worldwide. They are now available as Kindle books.

What inspires you to write?
I believe that I have unraveled some secrets about human consciousness. I write about these ideas so that others can experience them to. I am inspired by the feedback I get, for example, “I like your Meditations- they are simple, clear, but take you as deep as you need to know.”
I know that many hundreds of people wait expectantly all over the world to read my weekly reflections. This is truly inspiring.

Tell us about your writing process.
I commit to write for 2 hours 2 days a week, at the same time. I make this special space and I look forward to stepping into it each week. Sometimes I think of it as a place waiting for me to join it.

What advice would you give other writers?
I gave some advice this week to a friend who want to write an ebook for her Face Book page. I sat with her and asked her for the chapter names. I wrote these down. As we were talking she kept thinking of ideas that could go into each chapter. This is a great way to organise your knowledge. It could also work for Fiction.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
A Face Book friend showed me how I could publish my work as Kindle books. I have been writing for 10 years and so it has been quite easy to format these books for Kindle. I have published 9 ebooks in two and half months.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
Self publishing is the way to go. Kindle and Create Space offer you everything that you need. If your book goes viral you can always switch to a publisher.

What do you use?
Beta Readers

What genres do you write?
Personal Development, Bible Metaphysics, Spirituality.

What formats are your books in?
eBook, Print

Website(s)
Author Home Page Link
Link To Author Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5018803.Kristina_Kaine
http://www.facebook.com/EsotericConnection
https://twitter.com/KristinaKaine
http://pinterest.com/kainek/

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Interview with Author – Scott R. Larson

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About Scott R. Larson:
Scott R. Larson was born and grew up in California’s San Joaquin Valley. He has also lived in France, Chile and for many years in and around Seattle, Washington. He currently lives in the West of Ireland where he writes one of the internet’s longest running film blogs.

What inspires you to write?
I have always expressed myself better by writing than by conversing. If I have views on current events or the arts, it is easier for me to blog than to sit around talking. And, like most people, I have a few stories in me. Mainly they are inspired by experiences I have had or events I have witnessed. I have lived through some interesting times: California in the 1960s and early 1970s, France and Latin America in the 1970s, the software boom in Seattle in the 1980s and 1990s. There are some really good stories there that I would like to tell.

Tell us about your writing process.
I do a lot of planning and writing in my head. When I am walking or driving, my mind starts working out stories. When I actually sit down to write I generally start at the beginning and write straight through to the end. Rarely I will write something out of sequence. For instance the ending to Maximilian and Carlotta Are Dead came to me one morning, even though I was only about halfway through the book, and I typed it out immediately. I hardly made any changes to those pages when I got to the end of the book.

For Fiction Writers: Do you listen (or talk to) to your characters?
It sounds weird, but yes. They become like friends. I suppose it’s inevitable because you spend so much time with them in your head. It’s fascinating the way they take on a life of their own. So much so that they sometimes do things that I hadn’t seen coming.

What advice would you give other writers?
It’s kind of trite but true. Write something every day. Even just a small amount. The longer you leave it, the harder it is to get back into it. Waiting for “inspiration” to come is a bad strategy. Even when I feel like my writing is uninspired, I am often surprised later that it turned out better than I had thought.

How did you decide how to publish your books?
I published my book myself after surveying the numbers of other authors out there and the numbers of self-published books that were finding audiences and making money. Unless you find a publisher that is really taken with you and wants to champion you, you’re going to end up doing all the grunt work of publishing and marketing anyway. I was in the fortunate position of having production and pre-press experience so it was fairly easy to do my own formatting, production and press prep. And I like having control over everything about the book.

What do you think about the future of book publishing?
That’s hard to say. A couple of months ago I would have repeated the conventional wisdom that print books would disappear and everyone would be reading e-books. But my experience so far has been that there is still a strong demand for print books and that readers, retailers, reviewers, etc. take you much more seriously if your book has a print edition. So I don’t think print is going away that fast after all.

What do you use?: Beta Readers

What genres do you write?: Literary fiction, general fiction, coming of age, fantasy

What formats are your books in?: Both eBook and Print

Website(s)
Scott R. Larson Home Page Link
Link To Scott R. Larson Page On Amazon

Your Social Media Links
Goodreads
Twitter

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